Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDrug Czar
IN THE NEWS

Drug Czar

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
As the federal government shifts its drug control strategy toward drug treatment and education initiatives, the U.S. drug czar said Wednesday at an event in Baltimore that he plans to emphasize the expansion of drug courts to divert nonviolent offenders to treatment instead of prison. Gil Kerlikowske, director of national drug control policy, announced the changes at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine as he laid out his goals for the year. The former Seattle police chief said there would be no official change in the federal stance that marijuana is an illegal and harmful drug, a hot issue since two states voted to allow its use last year.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | September 6, 2014
Robert Taylor Jr., and Camille Haviland thought they were being safe - within the bounds of their dangerous heroin habit, that is. Having bought from a new dealer, Taylor tried just one capsule instead of his usual three or four. Haviland left on an errand; when she returned 15 minutes later, she found him collapsed on the ground, bluish and not breathing. She started CPR. When paramedics arrived, they injected Taylor with the overdose-reversing drug, naloxone. "At the time, I would have liked to have had this," Haviland said recently after she and Taylor were trained and certified to administer the drug themselves.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2010
When the nation's drug czar visited Friday, the recovering addicts at Tuerk House in West Baltimore did a little showing off. Those taking the culinary jobs training course whipped up a lavish breakfast. Those in the landscaping and maintenance program spruced up the grounds. "It's been a blessing to me," Mack Campbell, 56, said of the program that he hopes will finally break his personal cycle of addiction, imprisonment and relapse. "I'm learning how to live without drugs. " Inside, Gil Kerlikowske was offering much the same message — but on a broader level.
NEWS
August 7, 2014
This weekend's Moonrise electronic dance music festival at Pimlico Racetrack should be canceled immediately. This is to protect the welfare our children. The multiple deaths at these concerts across the country makes it a public health crisis ( "Deaths draw attention to drugs in EDM scene, " Aug. 5). It's very clear that police, paramedics, promoters, parents and concert goers cannot stop the flow of drugs, especially the drug "Molly or "Ecstasy" into these popular electronic music concerts.
NEWS
By Paul Shread and JoAnna Daemmrich and Paul Shread and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff writers | June 4, 1991
Anne Arundel drug czar Huntley J. Cross is leaving the limelight to go back to school.Nineteen months after taking over the Office of Drug and Alcohol Programs, Cross is ending his television spots to return to a post hepreviously held with the county school system. He will become assistant for pupil services as of July 1, said Louise Hayman, spokeswoman for County Executive Robert R. Neall.A veteran school administrator, Cross was praised widely as the driving force behind the school system's substance abuse program before former County Executive O. James Lighthizer appointed him drug czar in October 1988.
NEWS
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | November 30, 1990
WASHINGTON -- A White House ceremony is set for this morning to nominate Florida Gov. Bob Martinez to lead the nation's crusade against illegal drugs.In choosing Mr. Martinez, President Bush rejected advice to pick "a Washington insider" as his next "drug czar." Instead, the president turned to a political ally with 12 years of government experience in a state that has grappled with the drug problem.Some members of Congress and drug policy analysts say that because Mr. Martinez was Mr. Bush's first choice for the job, the governor should command cooperation among the nearly three dozen agencies involved in the government's war against drugs.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,Staff writer | March 17, 1992
An administrator for federal drug abuse prevention programs has beenappointed to the $50,000-a-year post as county drug czar.The appointment, made by County Executive Robert R. Neall, was announced yesterday.Charlestine Fairley, program officer for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Substance Abuse Prevention, will assume the post as director of the county drug and alcohol abuse prevention program April 1.The job means overseeing a $423,000 annualbudget and 10 staff members in an office set up to curb drug and alcohol abuse through youth tutorial and mentor programs, seminars in parenting skills and doling out grants.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson | June 9, 1991
Huntley Cross, the county's drug czar, is moving on.I don't knowif Cross is moving back to his old job in the school system because he wants to or because the Neall administration put him on rollers and tilted the floor toward the door.I've put in a call to Frank Robinson, leading expert on the transition phase of employment, but Frank hasn't gotten back to me yet.My gut feeling is that all is not well in czarland, and Cross was infected by the same disease that took the professional life of his Annapolis counterpart, Eric Avery.
NEWS
By John W. Frece | November 2, 1990
Federal drug czar William J. Bennett, who praised Gov. William Donald Schaefer's anti-drug efforts as a model for the nation 11 months ago, endorsed Mr. Schaefer's Republican opponent, William S. Shepard, yesterday.Appearing at a $125-a-person fund-raising breakfast at the posh Center Club atop the USF&G Building at the Inner Harbor, Mr. Bennett criticized the governor for "stiffing" Mr. Shepard by failing to debate him. He said Marylanders deserved a competitive two-party system, but otherwise only made a passing reference to the central Republican charge that Mr. Schaefer is an uncontrollable big spender.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Sun Staff Writer | September 19, 1994
People are telling Darius Stanton that they don't understand why he did it.Why would Annapolis' drug czar, believed to be the youngest drug policy official on the East Coast, suddenly relinquish his job in City Hall and set up shop in a tattered community center in one of the most troubled neighborhoods in Annapolis?He smiles broadly. "I felt it was time for growth and change," he said.Mr. Stanton, now 24, was only 18 when Anne Arundel County Executive Robert R. Neall hired him to work for his drug and alcohol prevention office.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
A group of alleged Black Guerrilla Family members met last December to discuss a robbery with a confidential source, who, unbeknownst to them, was working with the Drug Enforcement Administration. The price of cocaine in Baltimore City at that moment was "high" at $40,000 per kilogram, agents wrote in court documents, making the proposed robbery "especially lucrative. " "Coke price [is] high and everything, but a better price is free," the source told the group. In a more recent court document, however, that estimate had tumbled by 30 percent.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2013
As the federal government shifts its drug control strategy toward drug treatment and education initiatives, the U.S. drug czar said Wednesday at an event in Baltimore that he plans to emphasize the expansion of drug courts to divert nonviolent offenders to treatment instead of prison. Gil Kerlikowske, director of national drug control policy, announced the changes at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine as he laid out his goals for the year. The former Seattle police chief said there would be no official change in the federal stance that marijuana is an illegal and harmful drug, a hot issue since two states voted to allow its use last year.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2010
When the nation's drug czar visited Friday, the recovering addicts at Tuerk House in West Baltimore did a little showing off. Those taking the culinary jobs training course whipped up a lavish breakfast. Those in the landscaping and maintenance program spruced up the grounds. "It's been a blessing to me," Mack Campbell, 56, said of the program that he hopes will finally break his personal cycle of addiction, imprisonment and relapse. "I'm learning how to live without drugs. " Inside, Gil Kerlikowske was offering much the same message — but on a broader level.
NEWS
By Bradley C. Schreiber | November 11, 2009
The window of opportunity to bring down drug trafficking organizations in Central and South America is quickly shrinking. However, despite its recent efforts, the Obama administration still lacks the one thing that we desperately need to win the fight against the cartels: a strategy. While it may seem like an obvious thing to have, the United States surprisingly lacks a comprehensive plan to bring down drug trafficking organizations. The federal government does have some counterdrug strategies, but they are either too broad - like the annual National Drug Control Strategy, which reads more like an "accomplishment report" of past successes rather than a "how to" manual - or too narrowly focused, like the National Southwest Border Counternarcotics Strategy, which addresses, among other things, ways to strengthen security along the border itself.
NEWS
By Robert Weiner and Zoe Pagonis | July 27, 2009
In Baltimore last week, new U.S. drug czar Gil Kerlikowske made the case for expansion of drug courts to treat rather than imprison addicts and called for drugs to be considered a "public health crisis." Why, then, is the Obama administration proposing to spend an even higher percentage of its anti-drug resources on law enforcement than the administration of George W. Bush? Nowhere are these issues more resonant than in Baltimore. Felicia "Snoop" Pearson, a star of HBO's The Wire and a native of the city, said that her mother stole clothes off of her body for drug money and locked her in a closet.
NEWS
By From Sun news services | November 22, 2008
Mexican drug czar held in theft from cartel 4 MEXICO CITY: Mexico accused its former drug czar yesterday of taking $450,000 from a cartel he was supposed to destroy, going public with a scandal that deals a serious blow to the country's U.S.-backed drug war. Noe Ramirez is the highest-ranking law enforcement official detained yet as part of Mexico's sweeping effort to weed out officials who allegedly shared police information with violent drug smugglers....
NEWS
By Clarence Page | May 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - Our nation's drug czar is annoyed. If proponents have their way, the District of Columbia will vote later this year to legalize marijuana for medicinal purposes for the second time. John P. Walters, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, took some pot shots at the issue in a recent Washington Post piece that has been reprinted across the country. Unfortunately, he brings more smoke than light. "After years of giggling at quaintly outdated marijuana scare stories like the 1936 movie Reefer Madness," he writes, "we've become almost conditioned to think that any warning about the true dangers of marijuana are overblown."
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,Sun reporter | April 18, 2007
The White House drug czar visited Frederick Douglass High in West Baltimore yesterday to laud a faith-based program that places youth advisers in troubled schools. John P. Walters, director of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, said he was "very, very impressed" with the work being done by New Vision Youth Services. The program started in 2005 at Baltimore's Southwestern high school complex but moved to Douglass this school year because the Southwestern complex is closing.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.