Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDrug Culture
IN THE NEWS

Drug Culture

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | April 28, 1999
WASHINGTON -- What's on display hints that this is no ordinary museum: Rolling papers, the kind used to smoke joints. Turn-of-the-century pill bottles labeled "Heroin." And a chrome-plated Harley Davidson, once the ride of a dope-trafficking biker gang in New England.It is the federal government's newest stab at drug education.Set to open next month in Arlington, Va., the Drug Enforcement Administration Museum explores America's drug culture and how segments of the population became addicted as early as the turn of the century -- before federal drug laws -- and why, after painful lessons were learned then, millions are obsessed with illegal drugs today.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Justin George, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
Following the deaths of two concert goers in Columbia earlier this month, promoters of a traveling music festival have banned a number of items including bright, decorative, chunky bracelets known as "kandi," which is popular among electronic dance music fans but some say is linked to the drug culture. Tyler Fox Viscardi, 20, of Raleigh, N.C., and Daniel Anders, 17, of Woodbridge, Va., both died after attending the Mad Decent Block Party music festival on Aug. 1 at Merriweather Post Pavilion.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 29, 2005
BALTIMORE CAN'T arrest its way out of the drug problem. Police Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm knows that -- from experience. He learned it on the street as a young cop and later as a district commander. When his stepdaughter became ensnared in the drug world more than a decade ago, her experience reinforced his own -- although in a heartbreakingly personal way. The city Police Department's drug enforcement strategy reflects the commissioner's 30-plus years of experience, his homegrown knowledge of the city, his instincts, his humanity.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 29, 2009
So, give me that again: Heroin and cocaine are illegal - controlled, dangerous substances - because they are harmful to society, destroyers of bodies and minds, destroyers of families, even whole neighborhoods? Is that it? We have state and federal prohibitions against the sale and possession of these narcotics because, otherwise, we would have widespread dysfunction in American households and mayhem on our streets? We have devoted billions of taxpayer dollars and millions of hours of police work to stopping the illegal drug commerce because, without that effort, we think the United States would be a dangerous place?
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2002
Flanked by federal, state and city officials, as well as civic and religious leaders, Mayor Martin O'Malley officially launched a $2 million media campaign yesterday to urge people to fight harder against drugs and crime, saying it was a "call to action." "We cannot give up on one of our neighbors," O'Malley said. "We have to try harder. ... The time has come to turn the corner." The campaign - dubbed "Baltimore Believe" - begins Monday with a four-minute movie that will be played on the city's television stations.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | April 2, 1999
The 10 girls clustered around a conference room table at the Thomas J. S. Waxter Children's Center know too much about drugs.Buoyed by juice and cookies -- and the unaccustomed balm of being asked what they think instead of being told what to do -- the teen-age girls have just given researchers a street-level view of what's hot in the drug culture. In the words of one 16-year-old at the table, "This is like an early warning."The girls have covered well-worn drug turf -- heroin, cocaine, marijuana -- as well as some new drugs on the landscape, and their firsthand knowledge is one strand in an innovative project called Drug Early Warning System.
NEWS
By George Jackson& Doug McHenry | April 17, 1991
AS FILMMAKERS, we are greatly impressed but totally unconvinced by the idea that a movie can have a significant effect on the behavior of moviegoers.If influencing people were that simple, Attica would be a cineplex and the Democrats would buy Paramount.But it's never that simple.Attica is still a jail and the Democrats aren't running anything.Our film "New Jack City" is the latest example of the news media's tendency to deal with complex issues via headlines rather than analysis.In their reporting on the violence surrounding "New Jack City," some elements of the news media have neglected to put each episode in context.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 29, 2006
The 900 block of Bennett Place. Bennett Place is a two-block side street that cuts a near-microscopic path through the heart of West Baltimore. It's bordered by Fremont Avenue on the east and Arlington Avenue on the west, where the 1000 block ends. During my childhood, in which the peripatetic Kanes moved often, I'd wager we bore the distinction of being perhaps the only family to live in both the 900 and 1000 blocks of Bennett Place. On Monday, I entered Judge J. Frederick Motz's courtroom in U.S. District Court to hear William King testify at a trial in which he's charged with corruption.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 28, 2005
DOZENS OF Baltimoreans have contacted The Sun during the past six weeks to express a desire to end their roles in one of the city's most serious problems - the drug trade that supplies thousands of city and suburban residents with heroin and cocaine, ruins families and neighborhoods, and fuels the violence that keeps Baltimore high on the homicide charts. Addicts called for treatment, and those who sell drugs called for a new direction - specifically, the full-time job they believe will keep them from returning to the streets.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1999
Annapolis Housing Authority employees will spend two hours immersed in the drug culture this morning, learning how a crack cocaine pipe can be crafted from a soda can and what a "Loveboat" is (marijuana sprinkled with PCP).Far from being illegal, the drug and paraphernalia class has been ordered by their boss, Patricia Croslan. And their instructor -- Annapolis City Police Lt. Robert E. Beans -- is on the right side of the law."It's of great importance for people to be able to identify drug paraphernalia, particularly when they work in an environment where they might come across it," said Croslan, the Housing Authority director.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun reporter | October 2, 2007
Two congressional leaders held a hearing at the University of Maryland School of Law yesterday to learn more about Baltimore's drug treatment and violence reduction programs. Democratic Rep. Dennis J. Kucinich of Ohio, the chairman of the House Domestic Policy Subcommittee and a candidate in the Democratic presidential primary, and Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, who represents Baltimore's 7th District called the hearing. Cummings is a 1976 graduate of the University of Maryland School of Law.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 29, 2006
The 900 block of Bennett Place. Bennett Place is a two-block side street that cuts a near-microscopic path through the heart of West Baltimore. It's bordered by Fremont Avenue on the east and Arlington Avenue on the west, where the 1000 block ends. During my childhood, in which the peripatetic Kanes moved often, I'd wager we bore the distinction of being perhaps the only family to live in both the 900 and 1000 blocks of Bennett Place. On Monday, I entered Judge J. Frederick Motz's courtroom in U.S. District Court to hear William King testify at a trial in which he's charged with corruption.
NEWS
August 29, 2005
BALTIMORE CAN'T arrest its way out of the drug problem. Police Commissioner Leonard D. Hamm knows that -- from experience. He learned it on the street as a young cop and later as a district commander. When his stepdaughter became ensnared in the drug world more than a decade ago, her experience reinforced his own -- although in a heartbreakingly personal way. The city Police Department's drug enforcement strategy reflects the commissioner's 30-plus years of experience, his homegrown knowledge of the city, his instincts, his humanity.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 31, 2005
BALTIMORE'S drug cancer has eaten away at people, families and whole neighborhoods for more than three decades. It has affected the entire region in some way and, considering the thousands of citizens involved in this problem, seems intractable, a lost cause. Decriminalization is not the answer. No one I know believes heroin and cocaine are going to be made legal anytime soon. The war on drugs didn't cut the demand for dope, but it certainly gave us the highest per capita incarceration rate in the world.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 28, 2005
DOZENS OF Baltimoreans have contacted The Sun during the past six weeks to express a desire to end their roles in one of the city's most serious problems - the drug trade that supplies thousands of city and suburban residents with heroin and cocaine, ruins families and neighborhoods, and fuels the violence that keeps Baltimore high on the homicide charts. Addicts called for treatment, and those who sell drugs called for a new direction - specifically, the full-time job they believe will keep them from returning to the streets.
NEWS
By Ed Burns | May 14, 2002
HELP ME out here. Someone has taken the trouble to send the people of metropolitan Baltimore a message. The theme has to do with believing, and it appears to be a well intentioned, thought-provoking effort. But one point eludes me: Who is the intended target of this message? Is it meant for those last remaining families in those beat-down, boarded-up blocks in our fair city's mean ghettos? Are these folk supposed to believe that if they get involved in the process, perhaps pick up the phone and alert the authorities to the drug activity that any blind person can see, that the endless drone for pink tops would soon fade?
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | July 29, 2009
So, give me that again: Heroin and cocaine are illegal - controlled, dangerous substances - because they are harmful to society, destroyers of bodies and minds, destroyers of families, even whole neighborhoods? Is that it? We have state and federal prohibitions against the sale and possession of these narcotics because, otherwise, we would have widespread dysfunction in American households and mayhem on our streets? We have devoted billions of taxpayer dollars and millions of hours of police work to stopping the illegal drug commerce because, without that effort, we think the United States would be a dangerous place?
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2002
Flanked by federal, state and city officials, as well as civic and religious leaders, Mayor Martin O'Malley officially launched a $2 million media campaign yesterday to urge people to fight harder against drugs and crime, saying it was a "call to action." "We cannot give up on one of our neighbors," O'Malley said. "We have to try harder. ... The time has come to turn the corner." The campaign - dubbed "Baltimore Believe" - begins Monday with a four-minute movie that will be played on the city's television stations.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.