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By Mike Littwin and Mike Littwin,SUN STAFF | March 2, 1997
CAMDEN, N.J. -- The news hit hard, even in this city where gunfire is hardly news at all: There was Mike Rozier, famous ex-football player and native son, standing on a drug corner last November at 3 a.m., big holes blown through his chest by a .357 Magnum, his life -- just like in the movies -- passing before his eyes.No one knows exactly what happened on that drug corner last November, only that, if choreographed, there'd be no "Chariots of Fire" music. There was an altercation. Somebody had a gun. Was it a drug deal gone bad or just a guy so messed up on booze and drugs that he opened fire on his friends?
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | March 22, 2011
Both cops were members of high-profile squads targeting the most dangerous city criminals. One followed his father, a 28-year veteran of the Philadelphia force, into policing. The other took a bullet during combat in Iraq. Both Baltimore officers confronted men with criminal pasts — one for drugs, another for a gun. And both cops got shot — one died, the other survived — on the same street, separated by nearly 10 years to the day. Michael J. Cowdery Jr. interrupted a drug deal and was fatally shot in the 2300 block of Harford Road on March 12, 2001.
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NEWS
By Norris P. West and Norris P. West,Staff Writer | November 30, 1993
Three months ago, Fayette and Mount streets was known as a "drug corner." As in so many other drug-plagued areas, dealers and sellers did business in the open -- even midday, with lookouts keeping watch for police.Residents have worked for several months to rid the corner of that seedy image. They asked the dealers to leave and using the 1991 nuisance abatement law, they obtained court orders to seal two houses where drugs were sold.Now, the Franklin Square Community Garden brings life to the corner where drugs once brought the specter of death.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 29, 2006
Damn, baby brother. I can't believe it's been nearly 10 years since you left us. I'm standing at your gravesite in King Memorial Park as Mom walks over. It's two days before Memorial Day, and Mom's doing what she usually does: visiting the graves of her three deceased children and her late husband. The holiday is, mainly and rightly, about honoring American soldiers who have fallen in battle. But a lot of folks do what Mom does: honor relatives who have passed. I'm none too happy as I stand at your grave.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1995
The building at Annapolis' worst drug corner is battered and abandoned, riddled with bullet holes and filled with dead roaches. But for the Clay Street community, the two-story brick Butterworth Building is not a lost cause.By April 1, the city will put a police substation in the building at Clay and West Washington streets. Community activists hope to turn the building into a neighborhood outreach center.The Clay Street Improvement Association is working with the city's Planning and Zoning Department to tap government loans so that it can set up shop in the building.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Staff Writer | September 12, 1993
After Corey Baker was murdered last December, Angela Baker searched her only child's bedroom for clues to how she might have saved him from the devouring drug corner. She found a cassette, and played it on the stereo she'd bought him in a fruitless attempt to keep him off the streets.In a wavering, adolescent attempt at a rap song, the 15-year-old chanted his own epitaph, an epitaph for dozens of boys and young men who have died around Park Heights and Woodland avenues in Northwest Baltimore:L So living on Park Heights there's only one thing you can do,Go up and sell some blue tops.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and By Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2001
Ricardo Burley wishes he'd never seen the ambush, the man killed with a lollipop still in his mouth. Then he wouldn't have to be here, sitting in a witness chair, expected to tell a courtroom full of people about things that the law of the street dictates should stay in the neighborhood. He wouldn't be afraid for his life, like another witness in the case who was shot at the day he was to testify. He wouldn't worry about being labeled a snitch, a rat, the man who gave up Gregg Wright to the cops.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Staff Writer | September 13, 1993
When the police pull up at Park Heights and Woodland avenues on a sizzling Saturday noon, the cocaine dealers are in their usual spot in the shade of the big maple on the corner.Two beat cops step from their wagon, greet the dealers by name and inform them that they are loitering in a drug-free zone. It is a ritual familiar to both parties."I know you can get bailed out in six hours," says Officer K. S. Baskette, who has worked the area for six years. "But it's awful hot in that little cell."
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 29, 2006
Damn, baby brother. I can't believe it's been nearly 10 years since you left us. I'm standing at your gravesite in King Memorial Park as Mom walks over. It's two days before Memorial Day, and Mom's doing what she usually does: visiting the graves of her three deceased children and her late husband. The holiday is, mainly and rightly, about honoring American soldiers who have fallen in battle. But a lot of folks do what Mom does: honor relatives who have passed. I'm none too happy as I stand at your grave.
NEWS
September 13, 1993
Call a well-educated professional woman who heads a small neighborhood group not far from Park Heights and Woodland avenues to ask about the drug trade."
NEWS
April 20, 2003
SIX YEARS after he launched a 22-church effort to take back troubled corners, the Rev. Willie E. Ray is trying to revive the idea. He wants inner-city churches to confront drug dealers, hold nighttime prayer sessions at corners and renovate vacant buildings into safe houses for kids. "We want this to be a movement," said the activist, who has organized countless anti-violence demonstrations over the past three decades, including several hand-holding vigils. Mr. Ray is on the right track.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2003
Baltimore's new police commissioner, a blunt-spoken Bronx cop who headed New York City's drug enforcement, said yesterday that his top priority will be forming tightly focused neighborhood squads to force dealers off city corners. "Baltimore is at a crossroads between returning to its past or pushing on into its future," said Kevin P. Clark, 46, a former deputy chief in New York. "I believe that, with the help of my fellow officers, I can steer us toward the mayor's goal of making this a safer city.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and By Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2001
Ricardo Burley wishes he'd never seen the ambush, the man killed with a lollipop still in his mouth. Then he wouldn't have to be here, sitting in a witness chair, expected to tell a courtroom full of people about things that the law of the street dictates should stay in the neighborhood. He wouldn't be afraid for his life, like another witness in the case who was shot at the day he was to testify. He wouldn't worry about being labeled a snitch, a rat, the man who gave up Gregg Wright to the cops.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Neal Thompson and Peter Hermann and Neal Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 14, 2001
A Baltimore police officer who was killed Monday night as his colleagues questioned two men might have disrupted commerce at a thriving corner drug market and been shot as a consequence, investigators said yesterday. But homicide detectives have been unable to establish a clear reason why Agent Michael J. Cowdery Jr. - who was in plain clothes but wearing a badge - was gunned down. "Anything is possible," said Sgt. Ernest M. Anderson of the homicide unit. "We're running all angles out."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,Sun Staff | April 16, 2000
This time George Epps would need a few takes to do the scene. This time he would not be the guy checking into the Baltimore homeless shelter, trying to end a lifetime of drug abuse, but the fellow working at the shelter who hands over a blanket and explains the rules. This time Epps would face a dramatized image of his own life, watching his HBO movie self take the blankets and go on his way. Just act natural, they told Epps. Just act natural. "It brought back a lot of memories," says Epps, a recovering addict who appears briefly in "The Corner," a six-part HBO miniseries that begins tonight and runs for six consecutive weeks.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2000
Like an army plotting a battle many view as unwinnable, Baltimore police have identified eight more drug-infested areas they plan to reclaim by summer -- furthering Mayor Martin O'Malley's pledge to clear 10 open-air drug markets within his first six months in office. Police Commissioner Ronald L. Daniel released the department's 150-page strategy this week, a plan to defend and rebuild drug hot spots so dealers, touts and addicts do not return, in a city where one in eight adults is drug-addicted.
NEWS
By Scott Shane | January 28, 1999
THREE of us had parked our car just north of Preston Street on Greenmount Avenue and were crossing the street to eat lunch at the venerable soul food restaurant, the Yellow Bowl. Half the block where we parked is boarded; two houses are burned out and open to the weather, sky visible through the roof. The illegal drug trade bustles in the area.As we waited for the light to change to cross Preston, a gaunt man on the opposite corner suddenly yelled, "Tighten up! Tighten up!" The cry was echoed by a couple of other voices, sending some men scurrying away.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1994
In the early evening darkness of Jan. 2, 1993, Warren Stuckey walked up behind Larry Erickson, his childhood friend and fellow drug dealer, pulled out a .380-caliber Beretta semiautomatic handgun and shot him in the neck.Stuckey ordered another dealer to drag the dying man from Oakmont Avenue in Northwest Baltimore into an alley. He frisked Erickson, finding in the waistband of his trousers a .357-caliber Smith & Wesson revolver. Lifting Erickson by the collar, he fired the revolver into the victim's forehead.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | December 23, 1999
Col. Ronald L. Daniel was named Baltimore's police commissioner formally yesterday and immediately promised to begin an aggressive assault on crime in the city.At the same time, Daniel said he wanted to reassure residents that a variety of new policing tactics will be directed against criminals and not law-abiding citizens."There is no need to fear the police," Daniel said in an interview yesterday. "We will aggressively attack crime, not citizens."Daniel was introduced as the city's top cop by Mayor Martin O'Malley at a noon news conference yesterday attended by 100 City Council members, state legislators, police officers and downtown business leaders.
NEWS
May 23, 1999
IT SOUNDS like a joke, but Public Works Director George G. Balog is serious. He wants to hire students to canvass Baltimore neighborhoods to count the number of illegal pay phones. "That's one of our ideas," he said at a City Council hearing last week.We have a better idea. Since the Department of Public Works claims it has authorized only 592 pay phones, how about systematically removing the more than 1,000 phones that have no permits?A starting point should be the Community Law Center's priority list of 47 pay phones linked to heavy drug and prostitution activity.
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