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By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2002
The television ads are startling: "Yesterday afternoon, I did my laundry, went out for a run, and helped torture someone's dad," one young man informs the camera. "Last weekend, I washed my car, hung out with a few friends, and helped murder a family in Colombia," another says. "Drug money helps terror," both ads warn. "Buy drugs and you could be supporting it, too." That is the message the White House has been sending across the country as it pushes the war on drugs by linking it to the fight against terrorism.
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NEWS
By Neill Franklin | September 8, 2012
One hundred and ninety six people were murdered in Baltimore last year. Recent figures show our violent crime rate is more than two and a half times the national average. Many of these crimes spawned from the illegal nature of the drug trade, and the vast majority of them will go unsolved because so much police time is spent arresting drug users and low-level dealers. But this weekend, a cross-country caravan of victims of the drug war brings a message of change to Baltimore. Dozens of Mexican and U.S.-based drug war survivors, law enforcement officers and others with firsthand experience with failed drug laws have been traveling for weeks now, educating people about the destruction our policies have wrought and the futility of continuing them.
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NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 5, 2007
MEXICO CITY -- The United States and its Latin American allies are losing a major battle in the war on drugs, according to indicators showing that cocaine prices dipped for most of 2006 and American users were getting more bang for their buck. Despite billions of dollars in U.S. anti-drug spending and record seizures, statistics recently released by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy suggest that cocaine is as available as ever. Cocaine users and lawmen care about price and purity.
EXPLORE
By Aegis staff report | May 27, 2011
Harford County's Office of Drug Control Policy, based on the most recent state figures is successfully serving more clients than any similar local office in Maryland, the county government announced last week. As a result, Harford County Executive David R. Craig recently congratulated the staff of the Office of Drug Control Policy for its statewide recognition in substance abuse prevention programs. According to the county government, the State Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration published its annual report for fiscal year 2010 (July 1, 2009-June 30, 3010)
NEWS
By Irving J. Taylor and Kurt L. Schmoke | July 25, 2010
Assuming one agrees that necessity is the mother of invention, this is an opportune time for state government to devise new policies that will make our communities healthier and safer. One focus of those new policies should be the scourge of illegal drugs. For many years, and from our different professional perspectives, we have urged government to adopt an approach that treats illegal drug use as primarily a public health problem rather than a criminal justice problem. One of us is a psychiatrist and health administrator with more than 60 years of experience working with substance-abusing people.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1999
State and federal officials involved in drug control efforts promised yesterday to work to cut drug abuse among youths and adult criminal offenders in Maryland by 20 percent over the next eight years.The promise was the centerpiece of a first-in-the-nation partnership agreement signed by Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend and Gen. Barry R. McCaffrey, director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy.The agreement -- which includes no specific promises of additional federal money -- will allow state and federal officials to work together more closely, Townsend said, and will reduce red tape that can hinder drug-fighting efforts.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 16, 2000
PASADENA, Calif. -- A top ABC executive stoked a Washington-Hollywood dispute yesterday, saying the network stopped participating in part of a federal program after a policy change put the government in a position to influence the content of ABC's programming. The remarks, made by ABC Television Network President Pat Fili-Krushel at a seasonal media gathering to promote ABC shows, appeared to contradict statements earlier in the week by officials of the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 7, 1998
UNITED NATIONS -- With President Clinton and other world leaders coming here tomorrow for a special session of the General Assembly on the world's drug problems, the United Nations' top anti-narcotics official has submitted a two-pronged strategy that moves beyond the conventional approach of intercepting illegal drugs and arresting traffickers.Pino Arlacchi, the executive director of the U.N. International Drug Control Program, proposes the ambitious target of eliminating opium poppies and coca plants, the raw ingredients of heroin and cocaine, in 10 years as well as substantially reducing marijuana.
NEWS
By New York Daily News | January 4, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The Clinton administration is planning radical change in national drug policy, shifting the federal focus away from catching smugglers and dealers to treating those who use drugs, says the New York Daily News.The strategy overhaul, still in the works, could move the office of National Drug Control Policy -- the nation's drug czar -- out of the White House hierarchy and put it under another department."We're thinking of putting it somewhere else," Clinton transition chairman Vernon Jordan said of the office.
NEWS
By Steven Bodzin and Steven Bodzin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 19, 2005
WASHINGTON - In an apparent response to congressional charges that it was ignoring methamphetamine abuse, three high-level Bush administration officials went to a Tennessee drug court yesterday to offer "innovative solutions" to combat a problem that has spread rapidly across the country. "The scourge of methamphetamine demands unconventional thinking and innovative solutions to fight the devastation it leaves behind," said Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales. "I have directed U.S. attorneys to make prosecution of methamphetamine-related crimes a top priority and seek the harshest penalties."
NEWS
By Jean Marbella, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2010
When the nation's drug czar visited Friday, the recovering addicts at Tuerk House in West Baltimore did a little showing off. Those taking the culinary jobs training course whipped up a lavish breakfast. Those in the landscaping and maintenance program spruced up the grounds. "It's been a blessing to me," Mack Campbell, 56, said of the program that he hopes will finally break his personal cycle of addiction, imprisonment and relapse. "I'm learning how to live without drugs. " Inside, Gil Kerlikowske was offering much the same message — but on a broader level.
NEWS
By Irving J. Taylor and Kurt L. Schmoke | July 25, 2010
Assuming one agrees that necessity is the mother of invention, this is an opportune time for state government to devise new policies that will make our communities healthier and safer. One focus of those new policies should be the scourge of illegal drugs. For many years, and from our different professional perspectives, we have urged government to adopt an approach that treats illegal drug use as primarily a public health problem rather than a criminal justice problem. One of us is a psychiatrist and health administrator with more than 60 years of experience working with substance-abusing people.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
Employees with access to medications at Maryland's hospital for the criminally insane were also keeping the inventories, an arrangement with enough potential for theft to raise red flags for state auditors. A report released Thursday by the state Office of Legislative Audits found no drug shortages at the Clifton T. Perkins Hospital Center. But it did find 7,162 doses of medicine, valued at about $64,000, that were returned to the pharmacy without being re-entered in the pharmacy's inventory.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 5, 2007
MEXICO CITY -- The United States and its Latin American allies are losing a major battle in the war on drugs, according to indicators showing that cocaine prices dipped for most of 2006 and American users were getting more bang for their buck. Despite billions of dollars in U.S. anti-drug spending and record seizures, statistics recently released by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy suggest that cocaine is as available as ever. Cocaine users and lawmen care about price and purity.
NEWS
By Steven Bodzin and Steven Bodzin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 19, 2005
WASHINGTON - In an apparent response to congressional charges that it was ignoring methamphetamine abuse, three high-level Bush administration officials went to a Tennessee drug court yesterday to offer "innovative solutions" to combat a problem that has spread rapidly across the country. "The scourge of methamphetamine demands unconventional thinking and innovative solutions to fight the devastation it leaves behind," said Attorney General Alberto R. Gonzales. "I have directed U.S. attorneys to make prosecution of methamphetamine-related crimes a top priority and seek the harshest penalties."
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | April 27, 2003
FREDERICK -- A few weeks ago their world was all bioterror. They were fighting smallpox and other infectious diseases that could threaten U.S. troops. Today, the Army's top scientists may also be the best hope in the fight against an enemy that no one expected -- the deadly virus responsible for SARS. "When the fire bell rings, you go down the pole. It's the right thing. It's a clear public health emergency," says Peter B. Jahrling, principal scientific adviser at the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute for Infectious Diseases.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | February 27, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Former Florida Gov. Bob Martinez, in line to become the new coordinator of the nation's drug policy, faced stiff questioning from senators yesterday about his credentials for the job and his drug-fighting record.In the opening day of confirmation hearings before the Senate Judiciary Committee, Democrats asked Mr. Martinez whether President Bush provided him the job as a "political payoff.""I'm not sure you are the right man for the job. The burden of proof is on you," said Sen. Howard M. Metzenbaum, D-Ohio.
NEWS
By Neill Franklin | September 8, 2012
One hundred and ninety six people were murdered in Baltimore last year. Recent figures show our violent crime rate is more than two and a half times the national average. Many of these crimes spawned from the illegal nature of the drug trade, and the vast majority of them will go unsolved because so much police time is spent arresting drug users and low-level dealers. But this weekend, a cross-country caravan of victims of the drug war brings a message of change to Baltimore. Dozens of Mexican and U.S.-based drug war survivors, law enforcement officers and others with firsthand experience with failed drug laws have been traveling for weeks now, educating people about the destruction our policies have wrought and the futility of continuing them.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2002
Max Milton Ellison, retired controller of a local drug company and a swimming coach, died of complications from heart disease Sunday at Northwest Hospital Center. The Pikesville resident was 86. A former senior manager and executive of the now-closed Time Finance Company's St. Paul Street headquarters in Charles Village, he later became controller of Barre-National Pharmaceutical Manufacturing Co. He retired more than a decade ago. Born in Richmond, Va., and raised in East Baltimore, he was a 1933 City College graduate.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2002
The television ads are startling: "Yesterday afternoon, I did my laundry, went out for a run, and helped torture someone's dad," one young man informs the camera. "Last weekend, I washed my car, hung out with a few friends, and helped murder a family in Colombia," another says. "Drug money helps terror," both ads warn. "Buy drugs and you could be supporting it, too." That is the message the White House has been sending across the country as it pushes the war on drugs by linking it to the fight against terrorism.
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