Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDrug Companies
IN THE NEWS

Drug Companies

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
October 7, 2014
It actually doesn't do much good to head up an article about payments to doctors by telling readers that a doctor invented a great new device and the company sent him a check for royalties ( "Payments to doctors from drug companies, device makers revealed," Oct. 4). What would have been helpful is if your reporter had focused on whether the payments were justified instead of solely on the number of dollars. What's news is when device companies send kickbacks to doctors who didn't invent a device but merely used it rather than one from a competing company.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 8, 2014
According to a new federal database put online last week, pharmaceutical companies and device makers paid doctors some $380 million in speaking and consulting fees over a five-month period in 2013. Some doctors received over $500,000 each, and some got millions of dollars in royalties from products they helped develop. Doctors claim these payments have no effect on what they prescribe. But why would drug companies shell out all of this money if it didn't provide them a healthy return on their investment?
Advertisement
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Late last year, medical device maker Zimmer Holdings Inc. made two large payments to Dr. Andrew N. Pollak, chair of the University of Maryland Medical System's orthopedics department. The payments, one for $47,225 and the other for $45,902, were royalties paid to Pollak for work he did at Maryland Shock Trauma Center starting seven years ago in helping develop a clamp known as a fixator that could hold trauma patient's broken bones straight until they were ready for surgical repair.
NEWS
October 7, 2014
It actually doesn't do much good to head up an article about payments to doctors by telling readers that a doctor invented a great new device and the company sent him a check for royalties ( "Payments to doctors from drug companies, device makers revealed," Oct. 4). What would have been helpful is if your reporter had focused on whether the payments were justified instead of solely on the number of dollars. What's news is when device companies send kickbacks to doctors who didn't invent a device but merely used it rather than one from a competing company.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 21, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Rep. Lynn Schenk, D-Calif., won a significant break for the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries yesterday in behind-the-scenes negotiations over the shape of sweeping health legislation.In a letter to Ms. Schenk, House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman John D. Dingell, D-Mich., promised that he would work to eliminate President Clinton's proposed Advisory Council on Breakthrough Drugs.Mr. Dingell's panel is considered the most difficult battleground for health reform in the House, and he is having to use every ounce of his much-vaunted legislative horse-trading abilities to cobble together a majority.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon and Joe Graedon and Dr. Teresa Graedon,Contributing Writers King Features Syndicate | September 28, 1993
Drug companies are on the defensive. Open almost any magazine and you will find an ad or two touting the wonders of modern pharmaceuticals.There's the picture of the feisty fellow who's grinning broadly although he has his fists up, ready to duke it out "if you took away the ulcer drug that's saving him from a $25,000 operation."Then you have a woman, smiling happily with her cat snuggling on her shoulder. She appears grateful that the drug she takes to prevent a stroke "lets her hold onto her independence and life's savings."
BUSINESS
By David Novich | February 8, 1998
WHEN SmithKline Beecham PLC said it had entered merger talks with Glaxo Wellcome PLC, it sent shares of drug companies soaring on expectations that more mergers were on the way.SmithKline announced its talks with Glaxo at the same time it stopped negotiations with American Home Products Corp., giving traders the impression that SmithKline was serious about increasing its size.But smaller pharmaceutical companies have been a success even without huge investments in genetic research, and some of the conglomerates are still trying to boost profits.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | July 21, 1999
AUSTIN -- A story finally getting some attention is the hideous case of the U.S. trade representative trying to force African countries not to manufacture cheap generic substitutes for the drugs used to treat AIDS.Our government aims to protect the profits of multinational drug companies. Obviously, practically no one in Africa, where the disease is rampant, can afford the $15,000 a year that the drug companies now charge for the full AIDS "cocktail." And 85 percent of all AIDS sufferers live in third world countries.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg Business News | June 22, 1995
NEW YORK -- U.S. stocks were mixed yesterday as oil issues slumped for a second day, offsetting gains in the shares of steady-earning beverage and drug companies.Stocks of oil producing companies slid amid concern that the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries will boost production next year. Supplies of oil from outside the 12-nation group have hit record levels, leading some investors to speculate that OPEC will increase production to meet the competition."OPEC is talking about trying to regain market share,which means more production, more supply, and lower prices," said Kevin Means, chief equity officer at Aetna Life Insurance and Annuity Co. in Hartford, Conn.
NEWS
By Scott Klinger | October 21, 2013
Congress seems to be focusing its austerity efforts on America's most vulnerable citizens, including those who need help feeding their families. Meanwhile, large food subsidies that benefit the most affluent Americans aren't even on the table. The House of Representatives recently voted to cut $4 billion a year from food stamps, known more formally as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). A cut of that level would mean 3.8 million Americans would lose the help they receive to put food on their families' tables, according to the Congressional Budget Office.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Late last year, medical device maker Zimmer Holdings Inc. made two large payments to Dr. Andrew N. Pollak, chair of the University of Maryland Medical System's orthopedics department. The payments, one for $47,225 and the other for $45,902, were royalties paid to Pollak for work he did at Maryland Shock Trauma Center starting seven years ago in helping develop a clamp known as a fixator that could hold trauma patient's broken bones straight until they were ready for surgical repair.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | April 9, 2014
Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has placed its name in lights over the Inner Harbor, a mark of the Indian drug manufacturer's growing presence since the company located its U.S. headquarters in Baltimore more than a decade ago. Lupin, which today sells about 70 different generic products in the United States, started with three people in small offices at the World Trade Center in the early 2000s. It now employs more than 60 people on two floors at 111 S. Calvert Street, part of a U.S. workforce about 200-strong, said Mary Furlong, executive vice president of corporate development.
NEWS
April 3, 2014
Hardly a day goes by without a story exposing wealthy special interests sticking it to the average Joe. One day it's Wall Street bankers bringing down the economy, foreclosing on the unsuspecting poor, and getting off virtually scot-free. The next day it's insurance companies charging exorbitant rates for health coverage yet denying claims whenever they can get away with it. Drug companies and pesticide manufacturers lobby the Food and Drug Administration to delay pulling a harmful product from the market while unwitting patients or phosphate-breathing farm workers pay the heavy price.
NEWS
By Scott Klinger | October 21, 2013
Congress seems to be focusing its austerity efforts on America's most vulnerable citizens, including those who need help feeding their families. Meanwhile, large food subsidies that benefit the most affluent Americans aren't even on the table. The House of Representatives recently voted to cut $4 billion a year from food stamps, known more formally as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). A cut of that level would mean 3.8 million Americans would lose the help they receive to put food on their families' tables, according to the Congressional Budget Office.
HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 4, 2012
The staff at Anne Arundel Medical Center considered canceling some surgeries on a recent weekend because the hospital was running low on a common drug used to help bring people out from under anesthesia. It is the kind of problem hospitals and doctors around the country continue to face as drug shortages that began a few years ago threaten the way everyday medicine is practiced. The problem has persisted even after calls from Congress and President Barack Obama to find a solution and a federal investigation that found widespread abuses in the drug manufacturing and distribution system.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | October 24, 2012
The Food and Drug Administration released a new list of more than 3,000 hospitals that bought drugs from the company at the center of a nationwide fungal meningitis outbreak, including 89 facilities in Maryland. The drugs bought by Maryland facilities from the New England Compounding facility include those other than the steroid that has been linked to the meningitis outbreak that has sickened 308 people and killed 23 in 17 states. In Maryland 17 people have been sickened and 1 has died.
BUSINESS
By BILL ATKINSON | June 20, 1999
VIAGRA could use a little Viagra.At least the company that makes the impotence drug, Pfizer Inc., could use a dose of its own medicine. For that matter, many of the big drug companies could also stand a pill or two.These once white-hot drug stocks have cooled off, and some experts are staying away from them because, while their prices have swooned -- in some cases by 30 percent -- they have not fallen far enough."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | October 11, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In the national health care debate, President Clinton repeatedly casts the health insurance and pharmaceutical manufacturing industries as the villains.Some executives in the two industries accuse the president of scheming to destroy their profitability and to force some firms out of business.But behind the cross-fire, one of the best-kept secrets of the president's proposal is that it also offers these "black hats" some extraordinary opportunities. Some drug and insurance firms could profit handsomely from reform, especially if -- as expected -- they persuade Congress to ease up on the most onerous features of the health care blueprint.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2012
Congressional lawmakers investigating the shortage of lifesaving drugs used to treat cancer and other illnesses are looking into three companies in North Carolina and Maryland that they believe set up "fake pharmacies" to access the drugs that they then sold at a markup. The lawmakers, led by Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat, said Wednesday that they sent letters to the three pharmacies that they believe sold drugs to wholesalers that they also owned, which then sold the drugs on the "gray market" to entities that do not manufacture drugs or treat patients.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 21, 2012
A host of prescription drugs have been in low supply around the United States for some time, but doctors have been warning about a particularly acute shortage of a set of life-saving cancer drugs. Now the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said today that it has taken steps to boost the supply of those cancer drugs -- Doxil, or doxorubicin hydrochloride liposome injection, and methotrexate. On Doxil , the FDA plans to import temporarily a replacement drug called Lipodox to meet patient needs in coming weeks.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.