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NEWS
August 9, 1995
The apparent breakup of the Cali drug cartel in Colombia is good news if it curtails cocaine entering the United States. That would bring a shortage for retailers, a famine disappointing to customers and a price rise on the street. But the breakup would not alleviate the U.S. drugs-and-crime scourge if the services and sophistication of the Cali group merely popped up elsewhere and the supply of Andean cocaine continued unabated.The Cali cartel is just middle-men, albeit of great resources who corrupted their own government and brought business acumen to the distribution of mind-and-soul-destroying drugs on the American street.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 15, 2005
MEXICO CITY - More than 750 police and soldiers, backed by tanks, raided a maximum-security prison 30 miles outside Mexico City yesterday to crack down on drug gangs that had all but taken control of the facility. The raid was sparked by the New Year's Eve killing of Arturo Guzman, the inmate brother of fugitive Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, the leader of the so-called Juarez drug cartel. He escaped from another maximum-security prison on Jan. 19, 2001. Three other high-profile drug trafficking suspects have been murdered at La Palma in recent months.
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NEWS
By Roger Twigg | September 14, 1991
A 52-year-old Baltimore businessman killed in a drive-by shooting Sept. 4 was under investigation by federal drug agents for his role as part-owner of a ship acquired in a Colombian drug-smuggling and money-laundering scheme, authorities said yesterday.John R. Shotto of the 1600 block of Rolling Road, Bel Air, had admitted during federal lien proceedings in Norfolk, Va., in 1988 to owing $3.6 million to a firm linked to the Cali drug cartel -- the world's biggest cocaine producer, according to narcotics authorities.
NEWS
By Chris Kraul and Chris Kraul,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 14, 2005
MEXICO CITY - Once Mexico's deadliest trafficker, the weakened Arellano Felix drug cartel of Tijuana has merged with another gang in a desperate bid for survival, the country's narcotics prosecutor said yesterday. Jose Luis Santiago Vasconcelos, deputy attorney general for organized crime, said recent intelligence showed that the Tijuana cartel merged with the so-called Gulf cartel led by Osiel Cardenas to fend off usurpers. The main threat is from the Sinaloa-based conglomerate headed by Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman and Ismael Zambada.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 5, 1995
MIAMI -- A Colombian cocaine cartel may have paid $1.25 million to a witness in the trial of Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega possibly in exchange for testimony against the deposed Panamanian dictator, federal prosecutors have learned.An informer told the Drug Enforcement Administration that the Cali drug cartel paid the witness, Ricardo Bilonick, to testify about Noriega's ties to the rival Medellin cartel, with which Bilonick had worked, according to papers filed by government prosecutors in U.S. District Court here.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | September 25, 1991
Federal prosecutors in Baltimore are seeking civil forfeiture of $1.7 million seized from the recent sale of a commercial ship linked to the Colombian Cali drug cartel and the Sept. 4 shooting death of local shipper John R. Shotto.The government's complaint, filed late Monday in U.S. District Court here, also seeks the forfeiture of $38,000 in cash that federal agents seized at Baltimore-Washington International Airport three years ago from Ernesto Forero-Orjuela, who has family ties to the Cali cartel.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 1, 1999
JUAREZ, Mexico -- As FBI agents and Mexican police began digging for possibly scores of bodies on desert ranches yesterday, aghast Mexicans wondered how a drug cartel became so powerful that it could maintain clandestine burial grounds practically within sight of the U.S. border. Nearly 70 FBI forensic experts joined Mexican police and soldiers, some wearing ski masks, for the first painstaking excavations of the two purported mass grave sites, believed to contain victims of the Juarez drug-smuggling cartel.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Congress is close to forcing a major expansion of economic sanctions against international drug traffickers and businesses that work with them.Legislation to impose such sanctions on narcotics criminals throughout the world passed the Senate easily last month.After initially opposing the measures on both practical and foreign policy grounds, administration officials have begun to work with legislators to fashion a bill both the House and President Clinton could support.But while such measures have some support among businesses and government officials in Colombia -- the only country where the United States has used them -- they are being strongly opposed by the government of Mexico and a few of that country's biggest companies.
NEWS
By Ana Arana and Ana Arana,Special to The Sun | June 11, 1991
BOGOTA, Colombia -- As the government here prepares for the surrender of the world's top cocaine trafficker, some Colombians are complaining that their leaders have lined his incarceration with many of the trappings he has as a criminal.These include comfort, the selection of his own security guards, and the possibility that he may continue to run his drug empire from prison."The government is endorsing a policy of appeasement," complained a leading politician from the ruling Liberal Party.
NEWS
By Newsday | May 11, 1993
NEW YORK -- Crusading journalist Manuel de Dios Unanue was killed 14 months ago on orders from the "highest levels" of a Colombian drug cartel because of his articles about the group, officials said in announcing the indictment of two suspects in the murder.Charged yesterday in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn were John Mena, 24, who allegedly ordered the killing on behalf of the Cali cartel, and Alejandro Wilson Mejia Velez, 18, the accused trigger man. Mr. Mena has been in jail since last June on a drug charge, and Mr. Mejia was arrested Saturday outside a rooming house in Miami.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 31, 2002
MEXICO CITY - Outgunned and outspent, the Mexican government is nonetheless scoring striking victories against the drug cartels that have corrupted the country for two decades. More than 20 of Mexico's most-wanted men have been arrested in recent months in an anti-crime sweep without precedent. The accused drug lords are reputed to have controlled billions of dollars in cocaine and paid bribes to thousands of police officers, prosecutors and judges. The latest suspects to fall were Benjamin Arellano Felix, charged March 9 as the leader of the Tijuana drug cartel, and Adan Medrano Rodriguez, known as the Gulf cartel's operations chief, charged Wednesday.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 1, 1999
JUAREZ, Mexico -- As FBI agents and Mexican police began digging for possibly scores of bodies on desert ranches yesterday, aghast Mexicans wondered how a drug cartel became so powerful that it could maintain clandestine burial grounds practically within sight of the U.S. border. Nearly 70 FBI forensic experts joined Mexican police and soldiers, some wearing ski masks, for the first painstaking excavations of the two purported mass grave sites, believed to contain victims of the Juarez drug-smuggling cartel.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 24, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Congress is close to forcing a major expansion of economic sanctions against international drug traffickers and businesses that work with them.Legislation to impose such sanctions on narcotics criminals throughout the world passed the Senate easily last month.After initially opposing the measures on both practical and foreign policy grounds, administration officials have begun to work with legislators to fashion a bill both the House and President Clinton could support.But while such measures have some support among businesses and government officials in Colombia -- the only country where the United States has used them -- they are being strongly opposed by the government of Mexico and a few of that country's biggest companies.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 2, 1998
PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti -- Drug traffickers taking advantage of Haiti's location, weak institutions and inexperienced police force have turned the country into a major transshipment center for cocaine en route from Colombia to the United States.In 1996, an estimated 5 percent to 6 percent of the cocaine destined for the United States was moved through Haiti. By the end of 1997, the figure had increased to 19 percent and climbing. By some estimates, that means up to 50 tons annually pour through Haiti.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | September 14, 1997
UKIAH, Calif. -- Sgt. Ron Caudillo of the Mendocino County Sheriff's Department saw the change coming five years ago as he looked down an old logging road covered with 7,000 marijuana plants.His experience in the most fertile pot-growing area of the state told him that the garden was not the work of any local doper. The scale was too big, the rows of sinsemilla too straight. Whoever it was didn't even spread out the crop to avoid discovery.Growing marijuana in California was once the exclusive domain of native-born profiteers, flower children from the 1960s and enterprising potheads with a knack for horticulture.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 5, 1995
MIAMI -- A Colombian cocaine cartel may have paid $1.25 million to a witness in the trial of Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega possibly in exchange for testimony against the deposed Panamanian dictator, federal prosecutors have learned.An informer told the Drug Enforcement Administration that the Cali drug cartel paid the witness, Ricardo Bilonick, to testify about Noriega's ties to the rival Medellin cartel, with which Bilonick had worked, according to papers filed by government prosecutors in U.S. District Court here.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | January 15, 2005
MEXICO CITY - More than 750 police and soldiers, backed by tanks, raided a maximum-security prison 30 miles outside Mexico City yesterday to crack down on drug gangs that had all but taken control of the facility. The raid was sparked by the New Year's Eve killing of Arturo Guzman, the inmate brother of fugitive Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzman, the leader of the so-called Juarez drug cartel. He escaped from another maximum-security prison on Jan. 19, 2001. Three other high-profile drug trafficking suspects have been murdered at La Palma in recent months.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | October 26, 1993
Two assassins for a Colombian drug lord have admitted to the 1991 contract murder of a Baltimore waterfront businessman and the killing of a hardware chain vice president who was not their intended victim, prosecutors said yesterday.Their confessions, unveiled yesterday, bring to a close one of Baltimore's most puzzling murder mysteries.Juan Carlos Velasco, 26, and John Harold Mena, 25, Colombian nationals who were living in Queens, N.Y., told federal prosecutors in Brooklyn that they came to Baltimore Sept.
NEWS
August 9, 1995
The apparent breakup of the Cali drug cartel in Colombia is good news if it curtails cocaine entering the United States. That would bring a shortage for retailers, a famine disappointing to customers and a price rise on the street. But the breakup would not alleviate the U.S. drugs-and-crime scourge if the services and sophistication of the Cali group merely popped up elsewhere and the supply of Andean cocaine continued unabated.The Cali cartel is just middle-men, albeit of great resources who corrupted their own government and brought business acumen to the distribution of mind-and-soul-destroying drugs on the American street.
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | October 26, 1993
Two assassins for a Colombian drug lord have admitted to the 1991 contract murder of a Baltimore waterfront businessman and the killing of a hardware chain vice president who was not their intended victim, prosecutors said yesterday.Their confessions, unveiled yesterday, bring to a close one of Baltimore's most puzzling murder mysteries.Juan Carlos Velasco, 26, and John Harold Mena, 25, Colombian nationals who were living in Queens, N.Y., told federal prosecutors in Brooklyn that they came to Baltimore Sept.
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