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By Los Angeles Times | October 28, 1992
ORANGE, Calif. -- Frustrated by the risks and costs of evading drug interdiction efforts, Colombian traffickers have developed a way to build plastic and fiberglass products out of cocaine, according to FBI officials who displayed a cocaine-infused dog kennel at a news conference yesterday.That kennel and two others were seized during a 16-month investigation, and two men were arrested in nearby Garden Grove, Calif., Monday night. Agents said that the arrests and seizures thwarted the operation -- the first of its kind ever uncovered by federal drug agents -- and investigators quickly dubbed it the "Cocaine-Canine Connection" and the "Dog-Do Case."
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Drug dealers are lacing heroin with the potent painkiller fentanyl, creating a deadly cocktail that is killing unknowing users - sometimes within minutes of use. The drug combination has killed dozens of people in several states, prompting law enforcement and health officials to issue warnings about its danger. The Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said Friday that 37 Marylanders had died since September of overdoses after taking the drug mixture. The deaths accounted for 12 percent of 318 overdose deaths in the past four months.
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NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,sun reporter | June 26, 2007
An illegal drug operation run by three brothers and their two cousins sold an estimated $20,000 worth of heroin a day before federal prosecutors arrested eight members of the Southwest Baltimore organization on conspiracy charges, according to law enforcement officials and court documents unsealed yesterday. Known as "Smackdown," the heroin organization was a family affair led by convicted drug dealer Calvin W. "Cuz" Matthews, III, court documents say. His two brothers and two cousins, prosecutors said, were among the eight arrested late last week.
NEWS
By Matthew Dolan and Matthew Dolan,sun reporter | June 26, 2007
An illegal drug operation run by three brothers and their two cousins sold an estimated $20,000 worth of heroin a day before federal prosecutors arrested eight members of the Southwest Baltimore organization on conspiracy charges, according to law enforcement officials and court documents unsealed yesterday. Known as "Smackdown," the heroin organization was a family affair led by convicted drug dealer Calvin W. "Cuz" Matthews, III, court documents say. His two brothers and two cousins, prosecutors said, were among the eight arrested late last week.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1995
Developer Randolph R. Ayersman has built some of rural Howard County's most beautiful gabled homes, selling for as much as $725,000.But federal agents announced yesterday that they have taken away his dream-home business, saying he financed it through the sale of more than 3 tons of marijuana smuggled in from Mexico.Ayersman, 42, has pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, and the Drug Enforcement Administration has seized properties including his $400,000 Dayton home, his nearby farm valued at $450,000 and seven choice land parcels valued at more than $800,000.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | August 3, 1994
A former Havre de Grace doctor, who surrendered his state medical license last year amid allegations that he was illegally dispensing prescription drugs, pleaded guilty yesterday in Harford Circuit Court to one count of distributing Valium.Judge William O. Carr placed the defendant, Edward John Simon, 78, of the 3900 block of Somerset Court, on a year's probation and fined him $5,000.Simon, who had practiced medicine in Havre de Grace for 51 years, agreed to forfeit his 1991 Cadillac and $5,000 recovered when federal, state and county drug agents raided his office and home Oct. 5.Prosecutors said the seized items were used to aid his drug distribution.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1997
In public court files, he's known only as Confidential Informant 69.But to drug agents and prosecutors, CI 69 has become something of a legend -- a citizen brave enough to take on a well-armed drug gang that sold as much as $65,000 worth of heroin every day from an empty lot behind his East Baltimore rowhouse.CI 69, whose identity has stayed a secret to this day, invited city and federal drug agents to videotape the business from his third-floor bedroom window.The agents watched in awe as long lines of customers waited patiently for $10 capsules full of heroin while members of the "Sugar Hill" gang brandished Tech 9s and Uzi machine guns to keep order.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Staff Writer | March 25, 1992
A rookie city police officer was arrested last night and charged with federal narcotics violations after an intensive undercover investigation by Baltimore police and federal drug agents.Police and the agents, armed with a federal search-and-seizure warrant, arrested Lisa A. Evans, 22, about 9 p.m. at her home in the 5200 block of Leith Road in Woodbourne Heights. In the warrant, Miss Evans was charged with conspiracy to distribute heroin and distribution of heroin.Miss Evans, assigned to the Eastern District, resigned from the police force immediately after her arrest, police said.
NEWS
By Robert Hilson Jr. and Robert Hilson Jr.,Evening Sun Staff | September 26, 1991
An investigation into a Baltimore-based drug ring culminated today with the indictments of 28 Nigerians who officials say smuggled $200 million worth of heroin into the United States during the past year and a half.The investigation by local, state and federal drug agents, initiated by the Baltimore office of the Organized Crime Drug Enforcement Task Force, included a series of early morning raids today at areas around the country.During the raids, local drug agents seized 3 kilograms of heroin from a Greenmount Avenue pizza parlor, according to Roy Clagg, a special agent from U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Sun Staff Writer | October 27, 1994
A suspected interstate drug dealer was to appear at a bail hearing in U.S. District Court today following his arrest yesterday on a Pimlico street on a warrant charging him with possession of heroin with intent to distribute, said a spokesman for a federal drug agency.Arrested by U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agents and city police around 6:30 p.m. in the 4500 block of Park Heights Ave. was Frederick Douglas Brooks 3rd, 27, whose last known address was the 2900 block of Huntingdon Ave. in north Baltimore.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 5, 2003
BEL AIR -- An Edgewood man, who Harford drug agents say is the head of a drug ring operating in the county, was being held without bond yesterday after his arrest during an overnight raid by the county's Narcotics Task Force. Jason E. Easter, 25, of the 1400 block of Charlestown Drive in Edgewood was arrested early Monday by task force officers after they discovered cash and 21 ounces of cocaine in his vehicle, said Harford Sheriff's Office spokeswoman Ginger Rigney. Police also arrested five others on a variety of drug and weapons charges after serving warrants at several homes, Rigney said.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2001
In the first case of its kind in the nation, a Jessup businessman was sentenced to 20 years in federal prison yesterday for selling a candy sweetener to drug dealers who used it to dilute up to $500 million worth of heroin for street sales. John David Anderson, 37, was sentenced in U.S. District Court in Baltimore by Judge Benson E. Legg after being convicted in December under the drug kingpin law, which until this case had been applied only to people who distribute drugs. Anderson ran a drug paraphernalia business with the help of several family members, including his sister Rachelle Lanett Anderson, 38, of Glen Arm Road in Baltimore County, who was found guilty of aiding and abetting drug trafficking, and sentenced yesterday to 10 years in prison.
NEWS
By Michael James and Ivan Penn and Michael James and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Peter Hermann contributed to this article | February 6, 1998
Narcotics agents have hastily rounded up 11 members of a suspected jail house drug ring after fearing that a federal grand juror may have leaked confidential information to targets of their investigation, including notorious Baltimore drug lord John Edward "Liddy" Jones.The incident is a rare case of prosecutors' suspecting a leak in the grand jury process, which relies heavily on secrecy. As a result, authorities raided homes and made the arrests - which included two correctional officers - late Wednesday night, five days earlier than they had planned.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1997
A Timonium doctor whose office was raided by federal agents investigating his use of the Internet in prescribing fen-phen to patients he had never met has filed for bankruptcy protection, saying the raid has nearly crippled his business.But Pietr Hitzig, who once called himself "the father of fen-phen therapy," said yesterday that he hopes to continue practicing "telemedicine" not only here but in other states."I'm still a player. The last hasn't been heard from me," said Hitzig, whose offices were raided Sept.
NEWS
By Scott Higham and Scott Higham,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1997
In public court files, he's known only as Confidential Informant 69.But to drug agents and prosecutors, CI 69 has become something of a legend -- a citizen brave enough to take on a well-armed drug gang that sold as much as $65,000 worth of heroin every day from an empty lot behind his East Baltimore rowhouse.CI 69, whose identity has stayed a secret to this day, invited city and federal drug agents to videotape the business from his third-floor bedroom window.The agents watched in awe as long lines of customers waited patiently for $10 capsules full of heroin while members of the "Sugar Hill" gang brandished Tech 9s and Uzi machine guns to keep order.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 30, 1997
Attacking the federal government's threat to crack down on California and Arizona doctors who recommend marijuana to sick patients, a leading medical journal said today that the policy was "foolish," "hypocritical" and "inhumane."The 800-word screed in today's New England Journal of Medicine represents a dramatic endorsement by a respected mainstream medical authority of pot's clinical merits. In contrast, the American Medical Association has urged doctors not to recommend that patients smoke marijuana because the practice goes against federal law.In the editorial, Dr. Jerome Kassirer, the journal's editor in chief, urged the U.S. government to change marijuana's classification from so-called Schedule 1, meaning it is a drug of abuse with no clinical value, to Schedule 2, which includes drugs such as morphine that are medically useful despite being potentially addictive.
NEWS
By McClatchy News Service | October 8, 1992
LIMA, Peru -- Of course they don't expect flowers and cheers. But they also don't expect stones and bullets.Last month, 60 Peruvian police accompanied by U.S. drug agents landed in Palma Pampas, armed with a list of cocaine labs and warehouses to take out.Suddenly, they were surrounded by rock-hurling women who were shielding themselves with their children. Village men fired Uzis, AK-47s and 16-gauge shotguns in the air.This was not the usual, docile Peruvian coca farmer. After a tense, 20-minute standoff, the agents aborted the mission, boarded their helicopters and retreated.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | November 27, 1997
A Timonium doctor whose office was raided by federal agents investigating his use of the Internet in prescribing fen-phen to patients he had never met has filed for bankruptcy protection, saying the raid has nearly crippled his business.But Pietr Hitzig, who once called himself "the father of fen-phen therapy," said yesterday that he hopes to continue practicing "telemedicine" not only here but in other states."I'm still a player. The last hasn't been heard from me," said Hitzig, whose offices were raided Sept.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 5, 1995
MIAMI -- A Colombian cocaine cartel may have paid $1.25 million to a witness in the trial of Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega possibly in exchange for testimony against the deposed Panamanian dictator, federal prosecutors have learned.An informer told the Drug Enforcement Administration that the Cali drug cartel paid the witness, Ricardo Bilonick, to testify about Noriega's ties to the rival Medellin cartel, with which Bilonick had worked, according to papers filed by government prosecutors in U.S. District Court here.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,Sun Staff Writer | June 29, 1995
Developer Randolph R. Ayersman has built some of rural Howard County's most beautiful gabled homes, selling for as much as $725,000.But federal agents announced yesterday that they have taken away his dream-home business, saying he financed it through the sale of more than 3 tons of marijuana smuggled in from Mexico.Ayersman, 42, has pleaded guilty in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, and the Drug Enforcement Administration has seized properties including his $400,000 Dayton home, his nearby farm valued at $450,000 and seven choice land parcels valued at more than $800,000.
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