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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | April 5, 2011
Dr. John J. Gibbs, a retired Food and Drug Administration research chemist, died of complications of a brain disorder, frontotemporal degeneration, March 27 at St. Catherine's Nursing Center in Emmitsburg. The former Timonium resident was 73. Born in Troy, N.Y., he was the son of Donald C. Gibbs and the former Mary Loretta McBride. He lived on Mount Royal Avenue in Baltimore and earned a chemistry degree at the College of William and Mary, where he was a member of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | April 9, 2014
Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has placed its name in lights over the Inner Harbor, a mark of the Indian drug manufacturer's growing presence since the company located its U.S. headquarters in Baltimore more than a decade ago. Lupin, which today sells about 70 different generic products in the United States, started with three people in small offices at the World Trade Center in the early 2000s. It now employs more than 60 people on two floors at 111 S. Calvert Street, part of a U.S. workforce about 200-strong, said Mary Furlong, executive vice president of corporate development.
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HEALTH
Patrick Maynard and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
After her melanoma, Cheryl Stratos is mostly back to a normal life, running a business and driving her teenage son to weekend events, but there are reminders that it could all come back: The sores all over her body, the high fevers, the hair loss -- even the possibility of a suddenly shortened life. For Stratos, of Virginia, and others who have benefitted from a class of revolutionary anti-cancer drugs known as BRAF mutation inhibitors, another tool in the fight against relapse has just been sharpened: Drug maker GlaxoSmithKline received FDA approval Wednesday for a new cocktail that includes a BRAF-targeting component.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
When Samantha Kuczynski contemplated the biggest dietary problem in her lunch recently, she didn't point to the chicken wrap sandwich or the french fries. It was the dollop of ketchup that caught the eye of the 24-year-old Center Stage props artisan, who was eating outside recently. The World Health Organization has identified "hidden" sugars in processed foods as a major threat to people's weight and teeth - the condiment contains about a teaspoon of sugar in every tablespoon - and the agency proposed earlier this month that people limit the sweetener to just six teaspoons daily.
NEWS
December 22, 2006
Did you know?--One in 1,000 Americans develops blood clots, or deep vein thrombosis, after traveling on long flights each year. - Food and Drug Administration
NEWS
By Elisabeth Rosenthal and Elisabeth Rosenthal,New York Times News Service | October 3, 1991
The most popular prescription sleeping pill in the world was banned in Britain yesterday because of safety concerns, but the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said it had no immediate intention to follow suit.Although the drug, Halcion, has been the focus of a growing debate regarding its side effects over the last two years, health officials in this country were surprised by the British prohibition. They said they knew of no new studies that would shed light on the medication, which has been linked at times with memory loss and violent behavior.
NEWS
November 10, 2004
To make the brine for Patrick O'Connell's Spruced-Up Turkey recipe that ran in Taste last week, only loose sassafras tea should be used. The bark of sassafras root as a food additive is banned by the Food and Drug Administration.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | April 9, 2014
Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has placed its name in lights over the Inner Harbor, a mark of the Indian drug manufacturer's growing presence since the company located its U.S. headquarters in Baltimore more than a decade ago. Lupin, which today sells about 70 different generic products in the United States, started with three people in small offices at the World Trade Center in the early 2000s. It now employs more than 60 people on two floors at 111 S. Calvert Street, part of a U.S. workforce about 200-strong, said Mary Furlong, executive vice president of corporate development.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | January 13, 2006
The Food and Drug Administration will let researchers test small amounts of experimental drugs on people at a much earlier stage than previously allowed, under guidelines announced yesterday. The new rules are meant to help identify drugs that won't be approved before too much time and money are expended, federal officials said. Health and Human Services Secretary Michael O. Leavitt said, "The recommendations ... will help more researchers conduct earlier, more-informed studies of promising treatments."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | April 21, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The French company that makes the abortion pill RU-486 has agreed to license the drug to a U.S. contraceptive research group so it can find a manufacturer in the United States, the commissioner of the Food and Drug Administration said yesterday.The commissioner, Dr. David Kessler, said that after a meeting yesterday in Rockville, Md., Edouard Sakiz, president of the French company, Roussel-Uclaf, agreed to license the drug and the technology to make it to the Population Council, a not-for-profit research organization based in New York City.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
George B. Brosan, a career law enforcement officer who had served as Maryland State Police superintendent, died Thursday of cancer at his Annapolis home. He was 78. "He was a titan in both attitude and influence, and had a splendid career in law enforcement," said Cornelius J. Behan, retired Baltimore County police chief. "He was devoted to his family and he was devoted to the job. He brought integrity to his work and the agency by respecting the rules and the rule of law. " "George was as honest as can be and his integrity was never questioned," said Frank Panessa of Annapolis, who had worked with Mr. Brosan at the U.S. Customs Service as well as the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, which became the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration.
NEWS
By Michelle Minton | February 26, 2014
In Maryland, as in other states, consumers need to show ID when buying alcohol or tobacco products. Energy drinks could be added to that list of "adult" products if bills before the General Assembly are passed. House bill 1273 and Senate bill 986 were filed to ostensibly protect the Free State's children from a potentially hazardous product. But not only will the bills fail to protect minors, they could backfire and cause more harm than good for both adults and children in Maryland.
NEWS
January 8, 2014
Del. Dan Morhaim's recent commentary regarding the drug shortage ("Medication crisis," Jan. 5) was interesting and I'm glad this issue is getting more discussion in the lay press. It's been a thorny problem for the institutional pharmacy profession for decades. I'm a 40-year pharmacy practitioner who wonders why Congress can't empower the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for a much more active role in addressing the problem. It is often the case that large proprietary pharmaceutical manufacturers abandon active marketing of their products when those products have reached the end of their patent protection and their market is challenged by a less expensive generic product.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
Everett H. Wilson, son of Eastern Shore sharecroppers who was one of the first African-American students to enroll at St. John's College in Annapolis and later became a social worker, died Tuesday of pneumonia at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The longtime Severna Park resident was 79. "Everett was one of what we call 'The Magnificent Seven' who came to St. John's before Brown v. Board of Education," said Christopher B. Nelson, president of St. John's College. "He is one of the loveliest human beings who ever walked on the face of the earth.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | July 19, 2013
 Maryland has joined with 44 other states and the federal government in a $33.5 million fraud settlement case with the maker of an anti-inflammatory drug used after cataract surgery, according to Maryland Attorney General Doug F. Gansler's office. The Maryland Medicaid Program will receive $9,796.51 in the case that accuses ISTA Pharmaceuticals Inc. of marketing the drug Xibrom for uses not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The drugmaker is also accused of paying doctors kickbacks to write presciptions for the medication.
HEALTH
Patrick Maynard and The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
After her melanoma, Cheryl Stratos is mostly back to a normal life, running a business and driving her teenage son to weekend events, but there are reminders that it could all come back: The sores all over her body, the high fevers, the hair loss -- even the possibility of a suddenly shortened life. For Stratos, of Virginia, and others who have benefitted from a class of revolutionary anti-cancer drugs known as BRAF mutation inhibitors, another tool in the fight against relapse has just been sharpened: Drug maker GlaxoSmithKline received FDA approval Wednesday for a new cocktail that includes a BRAF-targeting component.
NEWS
January 1, 1991
Johns Hopkins Hospital has been awarded a three-year federal contract to develop new ways to test drugs that fight AIDS and other diseases.The $1.3 million contract from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration is one of three in the country, Hopkins said.It was awarded to the division of clinical pharmacology at the Hopkins Medical School. The other grants went to the University of Maryland and Georgetown University in Washington."We plan to look at drug safety, how well patients tolerate drugs and how well they work," said Paul S. Lietman, a Hopkins medical school professor who will direct the program.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2013
William H. Hoffman, a retired U.S. Food and Drug Administration official, died Monday from septic shock after kidney transplant surgery at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The longtime Ellicott City resident was 81. William Harry Hoffman was born in Baltimore and raised on East Lanvale Street and his grandfather's Owings Mills farm. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute in 1950, he worked briefly as a carpenter's assistant and as a draftsman at Bethlehem Steel Corp.'s Sparrows Point plant, while attending the Johns Hopkins University at night.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
A Sinai Hospital cardiologist is launching a clinical trial of a type of coronary artery disease drug not yet tested in humans, building on a history at the Baltimore hospital of research to develop more effective treatments to prevent blood clotting. Dr. Paul Gurbel is studying an intravenous drug for patients undergoing cardiac stenting, when mesh tubes are implanted to widen blocked arteries. The drug, known for now as PZ-128, would be given to patients after stent implantation to prevent platelets from sticking together around the device, potentially leading to heart attack.
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