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Drug Addicts

NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2000
Drug addicts and law enforcement officers have more in common than each group may realize, Baltimore's police commissioner told recovering cocaine and heroin abusers yesterday. "We all want a safer city," Commissioner Edward T. Norris said, addressing 41 graduates of Drug Court, an alternative program to help addicts stay out of jail. Norris, facing people his officers had repeatedly arrested, told them they were new role models. "You are leaders now," he said. Drug Court began five years ago to give nonviolent offenders an option: Go into treatment or go to jail.
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NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1996
Baltimore Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier said yesterday that he would rather spend tax dollars for treatment of chronic drug abusers and not incarceration.Appearing before a City Council committee that is considering his reappointment as police commissioner, Mr. Frazier said nearly half of the city's estimated 50,000 heroin and cocaine addicts do not want to get off drugs, and jailing them is not the solution."I think there is a medical alternative that could be better than what we do now," he said.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
Standing on one of Baltimore's most infamous street corners yesterday, City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III held up a broom and pledged to sweep open-air drug markets out of the city.The mayoral candidate unveiled his plan to implement the zero-tolerance policing strategy in Baltimore that has aided other cities. The crime-fighting effort would be complemented by treatment on demand for the city's estimated 59,000 drug addicts, Bell said."This broom is going to be our symbol from here on out," Bell said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | October 27, 1991
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health believe they have found evidence that distributing sterile needles to drug addicts could help to stem the AIDS epidemic.A study in Baltimore of people who inject illegal drugs has found that addicts who happen to have diabetes are less than half as likely to contract the AIDS virus than are addicts who don't have the disease.Dr. Kenrad Nelson, an epidemiologist, said that there is only one likely explanation for the difference: Diabetes enables addicts to buy clean needles at any pharmacy, making it less probable that they will share dirty needles when injecting heroin or cocaine.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 23, 1999
The Maryland judge who sent homicide suspect Donte T. Paige to Denver said yesterday he would have ordered the man's return months before the killing had he been told about his alleged disciplinary troubles. Paige, 22, was charged Friday with killing Peyton Tuthill, 24, after she interrupted a robbery Feb. 24 in her home in the City Park area of Denver. He had been sent from Maryland to Denver to attend a drug treatment school. Paige has been incarcerated in Prince George's County since being accused of robbing a Laurel convenience store three days after Tuthill's death.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,scott.calvert@baltsun.com | November 22, 2009
Only in hindsight did it strike anyone as odd: Carrie John never seemed to invite friends and neighbors into her Ridgely's Delight rowhouse. Instead, she would meet friends out, or people would watch from the corner to make sure she got in after a night at the bar. "None of us ever went inside," said a friend, Julie Della-Maria. The reason might have been the "huge gardens" of marijuana and assorted pills that police found on the day John, a 29-year-old drug abuse researcher, died after injecting what she thought was a narcotic.
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | November 22, 1991
"It's a disaster . . . I saw whole families infected with AIDS . . . I saw children, 12-year-olds, shooting up . . . I saw 16-year-old women prostituting to get money for their drug habit."With those words, Dr. Neil Solomon voiced his reaction to the infamous "Needle Park" in the center of Switzerland's largest city, Zurich. The park was created as a haven to provide drug addicts with clean needles to prevent the spread of AIDS, but has become Europe's drug supermarket and, because of that, is expected to be closed early next year.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
In "The Wire,"Lester Freamon famously said, "You follow drugs, you get drug addicts and drug dealers. But you start to follow the money, and you don't know where the [bleep] it's gonna take you. " Well, it's apparently taking folks to Martha's Vineyard for a chichi Obama campaign fundraiser. To raise some cheddar for Obama, National Journal reports via the Sunlight Foundation's Party Time blog that his campaign is throwing a little street party, Baltimore-style. Except that it's on the beach, in one of the country's most elite zip codes and at the private home of not junkies or cops or even dock workers -- but socialites.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 4, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A move by House Republicans to make major changes in Social Security's disability program took on a more bipartisan tone this week as Maryland Democrats called for a range of changes in the $65 billion aid plan.Acknowledging that there is "fraud and abuse" in the program, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, a Baltimore Democrat, asked the Senate Finance Committee to hold hearings on the program while some of her Maryland colleagues in the House -- both Democrats and Republicans -- urged various reforms.
FEATURES
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2000
Noticeably absent from Wednesday night's premiere of the Baltimore-based HBO miniseries, "The Corner," was Mayor Martin O'Malley. Although he sent his chief of staff, O'Malley acknowledged yesterday that he has avoided any relationship to the gripping, six-part movie depicting the desperate world of Baltimore drug addicts. O'Malley yesterday commended David Simon and Edward Burns of Baltimore, who wrote "The Corner," the book upon which the movie is based, but added that he doesn't think promoting the city's drug-addiction problem to the rest of the nation is in its best interest.
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