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Drug Addicts

NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,julie.bykowicz@baltsun.com | June 11, 2009
About 100 recovering drug addicts marched on City Hall yesterday to protest public funding cuts that will cripple a well-known recovery program. Chanting the name of the organization, I Can't We Can, they drew the attention of City Councilman Bernard "Jack" Young, who said he is powerless to help but "stands in solidarity." Other city employees stopped to watch the group pray and tell stories about addiction and survival. Al Moy?, who credits the program with his recovery from addiction, said lives and public safety are at risk if I Can't We Can closes its doors.
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FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
In "The Wire,"Lester Freamon famously said, "You follow drugs, you get drug addicts and drug dealers. But you start to follow the money, and you don't know where the [bleep] it's gonna take you. " Well, it's apparently taking folks to Martha's Vineyard for a chichi Obama campaign fundraiser. To raise some cheddar for Obama, National Journal reports via the Sunlight Foundation's Party Time blog that his campaign is throwing a little street party, Baltimore-style. Except that it's on the beach, in one of the country's most elite zip codes and at the private home of not junkies or cops or even dock workers -- but socialites.
EXPLORE
February 5, 2013
OK news media, every story has two sides. We have seen what convicted felons, mentally disturbed and drug addicts can do with their guns, which are stolen and unregistered to say the least. Two laws broken right there! Now, let's hear from those hundreds of legal gun owners who are alive and well today because they were armed and ready when violence entered their lives.   Over 60 million people in this country own firearms legally. Positive thinking, intelligent, hard working citizens living within their rights.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 4, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A move by House Republicans to make major changes in Social Security's disability program took on a more bipartisan tone this week as Maryland Democrats called for a range of changes in the $65 billion aid plan.Acknowledging that there is "fraud and abuse" in the program, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, a Baltimore Democrat, asked the Senate Finance Committee to hold hearings on the program while some of her Maryland colleagues in the House -- both Democrats and Republicans -- urged various reforms.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2002
A new public residential drug treatment center opened yesterday in Northwest Baltimore - the first new facility in 30 years - and city officials hope it will create more bed space for addicts wishing to become clean. The facility at 4615 Park Heights Ave. will hold 135 people. It will be run by Gaudenzia Inc., a 34-year-old company that has more than 40 treatment sites throughout Pennsylvania. The facility will offer outpatient and residential programs for substance-abuse treatment, as well as prevention and education.
FEATURES
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2000
Noticeably absent from Wednesday night's premiere of the Baltimore-based HBO miniseries, "The Corner," was Mayor Martin O'Malley. Although he sent his chief of staff, O'Malley acknowledged yesterday that he has avoided any relationship to the gripping, six-part movie depicting the desperate world of Baltimore drug addicts. O'Malley yesterday commended David Simon and Edward Burns of Baltimore, who wrote "The Corner," the book upon which the movie is based, but added that he doesn't think promoting the city's drug-addiction problem to the rest of the nation is in its best interest.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
The General Assembly passed legislation Monday night allowing Baltimore to distribute an unlimited number of syringes to drug addicts in Baltimore in the hope that access to clean needles will help curb the spread of AIDS. The 40-7 Senate vote sends the measure to Gov. Martin O'Malley. The bill is a top legislative priority of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who wants to end the requirement that needles be exchanged on a one-for-one basis. City officials maintain that the provision - in place since the needle exchange started in 1994 - limits the effectiveness of the program, which is designed to prevent addicts from sharing used needles and transmitting the HIV virus and hepatitis.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | April 18, 2012
A fellow named Joseph contacted me the other day. He's one of Baltimore's many drug addicts, still alive at 33, clean for once, and looking for a job. "I started smoking crack at the age of 14, shooting heroin at the age of 16," he says. "I am on parole and probation, and I can't find a job anywhere ... It seems like every time I get an interview, everything is great until they do a background check. I'm going to [violate my parole] soon due to non-payment of the [parole] supervision fees.
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | April 28, 2014
When Samuel Bierman and Zachary Snitzer opened Maryland Addiction Recovery Center last January, they'd done their homework. The co-founders knew they wanted to be in Maryland, particularly Baltimore County. But they chose Towson, where their center is located at 110 West Road, for a few reasons. "It's centralized, and easy to reach," said Bierman, executive director, "and the biggest group needing help are 15-to-30 year-olds. That's a major demographic in this area," a reference to the local college scene.
NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Lynn Anderson and Ryan Davis and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2005
A triple homicide Monday night inside a drug and alcohol recovery facility in Remington has opened a window into a cottage industry in Baltimore - small, unlicensed and unmonitored group homes where recuperating addicts and alcoholics go to live. "This is a totally unregulated, uncatalogued set of services," said Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, Baltimore's health commissioner. "There are many hundreds, if not thousands, in the city." Most are well run, fill a need and are not required to hold government licenses, officials said yesterday, but concerns about the Remington facility have prompted a state inquiry.
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