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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 11, 2000
SAN FRANCISCO - California's enormous prison system, the largest in the Western Hemisphere with more than 162,000 inmates, could be radically altered in the wake of voters' overwhelming approval Tuesday of a measure that will sentence nonviolent drug offenders to treatment instead of prison. Nearly one in three prisoners in California is serving time for a drug-related crime, more per capita than any other state. The new law, Proposition 36, puts California at the forefront of a national movement to reform drug laws.
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NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | November 22, 1991
"It's a disaster . . . I saw whole families infected with AIDS . . . I saw children, 12-year-olds, shooting up . . . I saw 16-year-old women prostituting to get money for their drug habit."With those words, Dr. Neil Solomon voiced his reaction to the infamous "Needle Park" in the center of Switzerland's largest city, Zurich. The park was created as a haven to provide drug addicts with clean needles to prevent the spread of AIDS, but has become Europe's drug supermarket and, because of that, is expected to be closed early next year.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | July 28, 2001
READ IT and scream. The story is about a man named Andrew Chambers. The Los Angeles Times and St. Louis Post-Dispatch are among the newspapers that have written about Chambers, who may become a symbol for everything that is wrong with the "war on drugs." For 16 years, Chambers was an informant for the Drug Enforcement Administration. His snitching led to the arrests of more than 400 suspects and the seizure of $6 million in assets. That's the good news. But the bad news is very bad. Chambers lied under oath on 16 different occasions.
EXPLORE
February 5, 2013
OK news media, every story has two sides. We have seen what convicted felons, mentally disturbed and drug addicts can do with their guns, which are stolen and unregistered to say the least. Two laws broken right there! Now, let's hear from those hundreds of legal gun owners who are alive and well today because they were armed and ready when violence entered their lives.   Over 60 million people in this country own firearms legally. Positive thinking, intelligent, hard working citizens living within their rights.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 4, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A move by House Republicans to make major changes in Social Security's disability program took on a more bipartisan tone this week as Maryland Democrats called for a range of changes in the $65 billion aid plan.Acknowledging that there is "fraud and abuse" in the program, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, a Baltimore Democrat, asked the Senate Finance Committee to hold hearings on the program while some of her Maryland colleagues in the House -- both Democrats and Republicans -- urged various reforms.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2012
In "The Wire,"Lester Freamon famously said, "You follow drugs, you get drug addicts and drug dealers. But you start to follow the money, and you don't know where the [bleep] it's gonna take you. " Well, it's apparently taking folks to Martha's Vineyard for a chichi Obama campaign fundraiser. To raise some cheddar for Obama, National Journal reports via the Sunlight Foundation's Party Time blog that his campaign is throwing a little street party, Baltimore-style. Except that it's on the beach, in one of the country's most elite zip codes and at the private home of not junkies or cops or even dock workers -- but socialites.
FEATURES
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2000
Noticeably absent from Wednesday night's premiere of the Baltimore-based HBO miniseries, "The Corner," was Mayor Martin O'Malley. Although he sent his chief of staff, O'Malley acknowledged yesterday that he has avoided any relationship to the gripping, six-part movie depicting the desperate world of Baltimore drug addicts. O'Malley yesterday commended David Simon and Edward Burns of Baltimore, who wrote "The Corner," the book upon which the movie is based, but added that he doesn't think promoting the city's drug-addiction problem to the rest of the nation is in its best interest.
NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2002
A new public residential drug treatment center opened yesterday in Northwest Baltimore - the first new facility in 30 years - and city officials hope it will create more bed space for addicts wishing to become clean. The facility at 4615 Park Heights Ave. will hold 135 people. It will be run by Gaudenzia Inc., a 34-year-old company that has more than 40 treatment sites throughout Pennsylvania. The facility will offer outpatient and residential programs for substance-abuse treatment, as well as prevention and education.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | March 20, 2013
Has it been mentioned anywhere that the couple who ran the Dogwood Restaurant in Hampden tried to change the lives of desperate people while serving good food and drink? There aren't a lot of businesses willing to hire ex-offenders and recovering drug addicts. It's a bother. It comes with risks, and there are plenty of attorneys to warn clients about "negligence in hiring," and the liability that brings. But the Dogwood believed in giving second chances, so attention must be paid, however late the notice.
NEWS
December 7, 2012
Health officials still aren't certain what is causing the alarming uptick in heroin overdoses that has occurred across Maryland recently. But it would be especially disturbing if the trend turns out to be an unintended consequence of state efforts to crack down on prescription drug abuse and fraud. The concern is that people addicted to prescription drugs are now finding them harder to get, and as a result may be turning to illegal narcotics like heroin, which are cheap and relatively easy to obtain on the street but which pose even greater public health and safety risks.
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