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Drug Addicts

NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN STAFF | October 3, 2000
Drug addicts and law enforcement officers have more in common than each group may realize, Baltimore's police commissioner told recovering cocaine and heroin abusers yesterday. "We all want a safer city," Commissioner Edward T. Norris said, addressing 41 graduates of Drug Court, an alternative program to help addicts stay out of jail. Norris, facing people his officers had repeatedly arrested, told them they were new role models. "You are leaders now," he said. Drug Court began five years ago to give nonviolent offenders an option: Go into treatment or go to jail.
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NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1996
Baltimore Police Commissioner Thomas C. Frazier said yesterday that he would rather spend tax dollars for treatment of chronic drug abusers and not incarceration.Appearing before a City Council committee that is considering his reappointment as police commissioner, Mr. Frazier said nearly half of the city's estimated 50,000 heroin and cocaine addicts do not want to get off drugs, and jailing them is not the solution."I think there is a medical alternative that could be better than what we do now," he said.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
Standing on one of Baltimore's most infamous street corners yesterday, City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III held up a broom and pledged to sweep open-air drug markets out of the city.The mayoral candidate unveiled his plan to implement the zero-tolerance policing strategy in Baltimore that has aided other cities. The crime-fighting effort would be complemented by treatment on demand for the city's estimated 59,000 drug addicts, Bell said."This broom is going to be our symbol from here on out," Bell said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor | October 27, 1991
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health believe they have found evidence that distributing sterile needles to drug addicts could help to stem the AIDS epidemic.A study in Baltimore of people who inject illegal drugs has found that addicts who happen to have diabetes are less than half as likely to contract the AIDS virus than are addicts who don't have the disease.Dr. Kenrad Nelson, an epidemiologist, said that there is only one likely explanation for the difference: Diabetes enables addicts to buy clean needles at any pharmacy, making it less probable that they will share dirty needles when injecting heroin or cocaine.
NEWS
By Jennifer Sullivan and Jennifer Sullivan,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 23, 1999
The Maryland judge who sent homicide suspect Donte T. Paige to Denver said yesterday he would have ordered the man's return months before the killing had he been told about his alleged disciplinary troubles. Paige, 22, was charged Friday with killing Peyton Tuthill, 24, after she interrupted a robbery Feb. 24 in her home in the City Park area of Denver. He had been sent from Maryland to Denver to attend a drug treatment school. Paige has been incarcerated in Prince George's County since being accused of robbing a Laurel convenience store three days after Tuthill's death.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 11, 2000
SAN FRANCISCO - California's enormous prison system, the largest in the Western Hemisphere with more than 162,000 inmates, could be radically altered in the wake of voters' overwhelming approval Tuesday of a measure that will sentence nonviolent drug offenders to treatment instead of prison. Nearly one in three prisoners in California is serving time for a drug-related crime, more per capita than any other state. The new law, Proposition 36, puts California at the forefront of a national movement to reform drug laws.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | July 28, 2001
READ IT and scream. The story is about a man named Andrew Chambers. The Los Angeles Times and St. Louis Post-Dispatch are among the newspapers that have written about Chambers, who may become a symbol for everything that is wrong with the "war on drugs." For 16 years, Chambers was an informant for the Drug Enforcement Administration. His snitching led to the arrests of more than 400 suspects and the seizure of $6 million in assets. That's the good news. But the bad news is very bad. Chambers lied under oath on 16 different occasions.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1999
Bel Air officials say they have nothing against group homes for drug addicts and alcoholics -- they just want to treat them the same as any other multifamily home.But lawyers for a company that runs five such group homes in Bel Air say they are different, and insist the difference gives them protection under federal housing law.Those clashing interpretations are at the center of a dispute that erupted last week over group homes in the Harford County town, which is debating legislation that would restrict group homes to areas zoned for high density.
EXPLORE
February 5, 2013
OK news media, every story has two sides. We have seen what convicted felons, mentally disturbed and drug addicts can do with their guns, which are stolen and unregistered to say the least. Two laws broken right there! Now, let's hear from those hundreds of legal gun owners who are alive and well today because they were armed and ready when violence entered their lives.   Over 60 million people in this country own firearms legally. Positive thinking, intelligent, hard working citizens living within their rights.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 4, 1995
WASHINGTON -- A move by House Republicans to make major changes in Social Security's disability program took on a more bipartisan tone this week as Maryland Democrats called for a range of changes in the $65 billion aid plan.Acknowledging that there is "fraud and abuse" in the program, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, a Baltimore Democrat, asked the Senate Finance Committee to hold hearings on the program while some of her Maryland colleagues in the House -- both Democrats and Republicans -- urged various reforms.
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