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Drug Addicts

NEWS
By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2002
A new public residential drug treatment center opened yesterday in Northwest Baltimore - the first new facility in 30 years - and city officials hope it will create more bed space for addicts wishing to become clean. The facility at 4615 Park Heights Ave. will hold 135 people. It will be run by Gaudenzia Inc., a 34-year-old company that has more than 40 treatment sites throughout Pennsylvania. The facility will offer outpatient and residential programs for substance-abuse treatment, as well as prevention and education.
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NEWS
By Ryan Davis and Lynn Anderson and Ryan Davis and Lynn Anderson,SUN STAFF | January 12, 2005
A triple homicide Monday night inside a drug and alcohol recovery facility in Remington has opened a window into a cottage industry in Baltimore - small, unlicensed and unmonitored group homes where recuperating addicts and alcoholics go to live. "This is a totally unregulated, uncatalogued set of services," said Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, Baltimore's health commissioner. "There are many hundreds, if not thousands, in the city." Most are well run, fill a need and are not required to hold government licenses, officials said yesterday, but concerns about the Remington facility have prompted a state inquiry.
NEWS
June 2, 1995
It has been only nine months since Baltimore City began its needle exchange program. But the experiment to reduce the frequency with which AIDS is transmitted from one drug user to another by sharing the same hypodermic has already been declared a success.That assessment is based on how many drug addicts are participating. So far, more than 2,300 persons have traded their used hypodermic needles for new ones. That's five times more than was predicted for the entire first year. But it's still only a fraction of the estimated 48,000 drug addicts in the city.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 14, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Social Security's welfare program for the disabled, blind and aged came under sharp attack on Capitol Hill yesterday as a powerful Democratic senator, focusing on benefits for children, drug addicts and alcoholics, called it "a prime example of a well-intentioned entitlement program run amok."Sen. Robert C. Byrd, the West Virginia Democrat who is chairman of the Appropriations Committee, said the program is a "microcosm of what is wrong with our federal deficit, not to mention the damage that is being done to our children in teaching them that their future lies not in hard work but in ripping off the federal government for benefits."
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | February 18, 1994
Several of Maryland's most powerful public officials lent support yesterday to plans for a Baltimore needle-exchange program that the state legislature has rejected the past two years.The proposal picked up momentum at a House committee hearing yesterday when the state's top health and public safety officers joined Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke in urging lawmakers' approval.And state Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. and House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr. said they, too, back the plan.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1995
Although the number of new AIDS cases in the United States dipped last year, the epidemic has shown no signs of abating in Baltimore and Maryland.With 2,951 people diagnosed in the state last fiscal year, Maryland had the fourth-highest rate of new cases in the nation, trailing New York, Florida and New Jersey, according to figures released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Two years ago, the state ranked eighth.In the fiscal year that ended June 30, about 59 new cases were diagnosed for every 100,000 people living in the state, compared with 45 per 100,000 a year earlier.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 14, 1998
In a Southwest Baltimore high school auditorium yesterday, students saw the beginning of a new $195 million anti-drugs media campaign paid for by the U.S. government and promoted by the White House drug czar, Barry R. McCaffrey.Baltimore is one of 12 cities selected for a pilot program starting tomorrow that aims to prevent and "deglamorize" drug use with sophisticated advertising techniques, according to McCaffrey,director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy.At Edmondson-Westside Senior High, Rep. Elijah E. Cummings, a Baltimore Democrat, presided at the preview of four television ads about to hit the airwaves -- part of a program that will include radio, print and Internet advertising.
NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | July 12, 1992
A group of recovering drug addicts is trying to help slow the spread of AIDS in Baltimore with a plan to go into city neighborhoods to pick up used needles and syringes.The plan was unveiled yesterday by city health officials and All of Us Helping Us, a group of drug addicts who have tested positive for HIV, which causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome."No one has taken an effort to slow down HIV by cleaning up syringes," said Troy McMillion, head of All of Us Helping Us. "If there was a situation where children are playing and abandoned houses are serving as shooting galleries, we'd go in and clean up the houses."
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,SUN STAFF | September 1, 2001
With substantial help from a leading philanthropic organization, the city plans to turn a bankrupt nursing home in Northwest Baltimore into a 124-bed residential center to provide intensive, long-term treatment for drug addicts -- creating the largest facility of its kind in town. The plan survived an 11th-hour bid by a local developer to acquire the property for an assisted-living center. Apprised of the city's eight-month effort to transform the former Greenspring Nursing and Rehabilitation Center into a large drug-treatment facility, Whistler Development Corp.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 11, 2000
SAN FRANCISCO - California's enormous prison system, the largest in the Western Hemisphere with more than 162,000 inmates, could be radically altered in the wake of voters' overwhelming approval Tuesday of a measure that will sentence nonviolent drug offenders to treatment instead of prison. Nearly one in three prisoners in California is serving time for a drug-related crime, more per capita than any other state. The new law, Proposition 36, puts California at the forefront of a national movement to reform drug laws.
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