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NEWS
June 26, 2014
Mike Gimbel's letter about a harm-reduction program that trains people to administer the anti-overdose medication Narcan was based on an outdated, stereotypical description of drug addicts ( "Narcan won't solve the problem of addiction," June 23). While there may be many drug addicts who "aren't good parents and can't do an honest day's work," I have had the pleasure to know many addicts who go to work every day, are good parents to their children and would be considered contributing members of their community.
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NEWS
June 30, 2014
Let me first state that the point of naloxone is not to cure substance abuse but to provide another tool to save someone who is sick and suffering a medical emergency. I have always been perplexed by Baltimore County's decision to grant Mike Gimbel a title such as "drug czar" and promote him as the number one substance abuse expert in Maryland ( "Narcan won't solve the problem of addiction," June 23). While we are all entitled to our personal opinions, he has repeatedly passed off his as professional ones.
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NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner and John B. O'Donnell and Jim Haner,Sun Staff Writers | February 9, 1995
With Congress about to consider even tougher action against them, 172,000 drug addicts and alcoholics are being notified this week that they face the loss of federal disability checks beginning in three years.In a letter to each recipient, the Social Security Administration is outlining the terms of a nationwide crackdown that lawmakers ordered after congressional investigators said many addicts and alcoholics use monthly checks to support their habits. The investigators also faulted Social Security for doing a poor job of monitoring addicts and getting them into treatment.
NEWS
June 26, 2014
Mike Gimbel's letter about a harm-reduction program that trains people to administer the anti-overdose medication Narcan was based on an outdated, stereotypical description of drug addicts ( "Narcan won't solve the problem of addiction," June 23). While there may be many drug addicts who "aren't good parents and can't do an honest day's work," I have had the pleasure to know many addicts who go to work every day, are good parents to their children and would be considered contributing members of their community.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | March 29, 2007
Most of the drug dealers I've met are drug addicts. They would not fit the TV version of a drug dealer: Bling-bling king, all smooth from drinking Remy and smoking weed, cruising the `hood in a shiny black Navigator, scooping up cash as he goes. The ones I've met do not own or lease motor vehicles; many of them live with their mothers. They sell drugs of the same variety they use. They do not make much money, and some of them wind up dead because they may have snorted dope they were supposed to sell or failed to pay their debts.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2000
For the first time in 10 years, a community-based drug treatment center is on its way to opening in the heart of Baltimore, where the pulse of drug traffic beats fast. The basement of New Life Evangelical Baptist Church, at the corner of East North Avenue and Port Street, will soon be converted into a clinic, filling a need in the East Baltimore neighborhood, said the Rev. Milton E. Williams, the church's pastor and founder. The city's health commissioner, Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, who attended a groundbreaking ceremony Friday for the Turning Point substance abuse clinic, noted a lack of treatment and resources for drug treatment where it is needed most.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | May 25, 1995
Funds for hundreds of additional drug treatment and day care slots were approved yesterday by the board overseeing Baltimore's multimillion dollar federal revitalization effort.But the approval of $6.4 million to treat 5,400 drug addicts and provide day care subsidies for 360 children rekindled a debate about whether too much money was being spent to expand existing social service programs and not enough was being directed to create jobs.The money is in addition to $34 million for business development, housing and job training programs approved last month.
NEWS
By ASSOCCIATED PRESS | November 24, 1990
HOLYOKE, Mass. (AP) -- Drug addicts trying to scrape up quick cash in this struggling mill city are turning to the unusual plunder of disposable diapers, baby formula and Tylenol, police say.Across the country, addicts in Los Angeles are likely to grab car stereos; in Miami, aluminum awnings and copper wire are snagged by those looking for ready money, police there said."
NEWS
By KRIS ANTONELLI and KRIS ANTONELLI,SUN STAFF | December 26, 1999
For all its wealth, Howard County invests little of its money in treatment- programs for the increasing number of heroin addicts who have few places to turn for help. In a county where the median family income is the highest in the state and it is common for homeowners to pay more than $200,000 for a house on a quarter-acre lot, there are no county-sponsored inpatient treatment centers or methadone clinics. In Howard, 342 heroin addicts sought help last year at state-certified treatment centers.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | November 3, 1992
In a city where an estimated 30,000 people shoot drugs, there is no shortage of fodder for a daylong conference on addiction. But to Dr. Joshua Mitchell, chairman of Saturday's forum, "The African American Perspective on Substance Abuse," one issue surpasses all others."
NEWS
By Barbara Pash | April 28, 2014
When Samuel Bierman and Zachary Snitzer opened Maryland Addiction Recovery Center last January, they'd done their homework. The co-founders knew they wanted to be in Maryland, particularly Baltimore County. But they chose Towson, where their center is located at 110 West Road, for a few reasons. "It's centralized, and easy to reach," said Bierman, executive director, "and the biggest group needing help are 15-to-30 year-olds. That's a major demographic in this area," a reference to the local college scene.
NEWS
April 8, 2014
Here are some of the issues senators and delegates considered during the 2014 Maryland General Assembly session. To become law, bills passed by the legislature must be signed by the governor. WAGES/TAXES The Assembly approved Gov. Martin O'Malley's proposal to gradually raise the state's minimum wage to $10.10, but it won't fully take effect until 2018. State-funded workers who care for the disabled also will get a raise. In a nod to wealthier Marylanders, lawmakers passed a bill that eventually will spare 80 percent of heirs currently subject to the estate tax. It raises from $1 million to $5 million the threshold at which estates are subject to taxation.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
The General Assembly passed legislation Monday night allowing Baltimore to distribute an unlimited number of syringes to drug addicts in Baltimore in the hope that access to clean needles will help curb the spread of AIDS. The 40-7 Senate vote sends the measure to Gov. Martin O'Malley. The bill is a top legislative priority of Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, who wants to end the requirement that needles be exchanged on a one-for-one basis. City officials maintain that the provision - in place since the needle exchange started in 1994 - limits the effectiveness of the program, which is designed to prevent addicts from sharing used needles and transmitting the HIV virus and hepatitis.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
In reference to "Market malaise" (March 9), I fault the city government, the police department and all mayors past and present for the monstrosity that is World Famous Lexington Market. If reporter Scott Calvert can tell the public the story of the ugliness that prevails in and around this market, why haven't the powers that be taken charge? I used to ride the subway from Baltimore County to go to the Hippodrome Theater , but the last time I went was so devastating with the drug addicts and dealers, plus harassment of theater goers, I refuse to come back.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
Hoping to curb the spread of HIV, Baltimore officials want to hand out thousands more needles to drug addicts than Maryland law now allows. Since 1994, city Health Department vans that work with addicts have traded clean syringes for used ones in a one-for-one exchange, currently distributing 500,000 needles a year. City officials say that system hasn't stopped enough heroin addicts from sharing or reusing needles and spreading disease. So the Rawlings-Blake administration is asking the General Assembly to pass legislation allowing the city to distribute as many syringes as an addict needs - no strings attached - as is done in New York, Chicago, San Francisco and Vancouver.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | January 15, 2014
Economist and funny man Ben Stein, who regularly delivers his contrarian views in a grouchy monotone on "CBS Sunday Morning," can whipsaw you between furious disagreement and fist-pumping assent faster than you thought possible. He's Jewish, but has no problem with Christmas or with anyone wishing him a Merry Christmas. But he despises Darwinism and anyone who believes in evolution, and believes it was science like this that led to the Holocaust. He's conservative, but he doesn't think President Barack Obama is to blame for the recession.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2000
A federal judge yesterday ordered the port of Baltimore to lease a long-term berth to a former Navy ship on which a nonprofit organization has long sought to open a drug recovery program. "It was a great day," said Reid Weingarten, a lawyer for the organization, Project Life, after U.S. District Judge William M. Nickerson's ruling. "We got a home." Project Life has sought for seven years to start a program for drug-addicted women aboard the Sanctuary, a 14,000-ton former Navy hospital ship.
TOPIC
By Kathleen Parker | August 1, 1999
YOU'VE PROBABLY heard about the racist sterilization program that bribes addled drug addicts -- primarily black women -- to submit to birth control in exchange for a free fix.Well, not quite. Yet one might infer this from a story by the Associated Press that recently appeared in newspapers across the country.The story told of a privately funded California program "making its way across the country" (like the plague?) that "pays $200 to drug-addicted women to get their tubes tied," drawing "the wrath of critics who call it shortsighted, racist and a source of drug money for users."
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 16, 2013
Terry Reed, likely Baltimore's best-known panhandler — the one with prosthetic arms and legs, who for years worked the traffic along President Street through all kinds of weather — is alive and doing much better than anyone thought he would. He's in a nursing-rehabilitation center on the city's west side, where he went six months ago, after going through heroin detoxification at University of Maryland Hospital. "I'm clean, Dan," he told me Thursday, a declaration confirmed by a social worker familiar with Reed's situation and, most of all, by his demeanor: clear, lucid and alert.
NEWS
By Deborah Agus | August 14, 2013
It is mid-morning on a recent Friday in West Baltimore, and there is a long line snaking down the street and around the corner. Why? Vendors are dispensing free heroin samples. In other areas of the city, buyers are risking arrest and drug contamination to illegally purchase buprenorphine. It is legal medication when given with a prescription. It is used to treat opioid addiction and facilitate recovery. So why buy it illegally? Not to get high as a substitute for heroin. They are using it to treat their heroin addiction.
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