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SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2010
Federal lawmakers say they are studying whether horse racing is doing enough to curb abusive drug practices endangering horses and their jockeys — or whether Congress must step in. Sen. Tom Udall, a New Mexico Democrat, and Rep. Edward Whitfield, a Republican from Kentucky, are reviewing dozens of pages of data received from three industry groups Friday in response to the legislators' series of safety-related questions. Udall and Whitfield want to learn whether the industry has toughened its anti-doping rules since a congressional hearing two years ago. The hearing followed the breakdown of Eight Belles after the 2008 Kentucky Derby, and of Barbaro in the 2006 Preakness.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Continuing Maryland's push to stem drug abuse, officials sought Wednesday to refocus the annual prescription "take-back" day on treatment and prevention and away from law enforcement. The nationwide take-back day — which is Saturday — has traditionally been used by its sponsors at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to collect expired or unneeded prescription drugs that could be abused if left in family medicine cabinets, or could poison children or pollute the environment.
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BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2013
It's just urine. But for a Baltimore company and a rival, it's liquid gold worth bruising legal battles. When a patient is prescribed a powerful painkiller like Vicodin or OxyContin, many doctors require periodic urine tests to check dosage levels as part of safeguards to ensure the drug isn't being abused. Some states are making the practice law, and that means a big opportunity for Baltimore-based Ameritox Ltd. and other companies that have rushed to meet the demand. The competition has spawned no fewer than a half-dozen lawsuits in recent years and what one judge called an "advertising war" between Ameritox and San Diego-based rival Millennium Laboratories.
NEWS
September 14, 2014
State officials are hoping a new public health initiative to track the distribution and sale of highly addictive prescription drugs in Maryland can help reduce the number of people who abuse such medications. The initiative, inspired by a program originally developed in Kentucky 15 years ago, has led to a drastic drop in prescription drug abuse there, and it has the potential to become an important element in Maryland's overall effort to reduce overdose deaths from both legal and illegal drugs.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | February 7, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Congressional leaders criticized the Bush administration yesterday for overstating its gains in reducing drug abuse, and the Senate Judiciary Committee chairman said the government should spend $3 billion more than the White House has proposed next year for the war on drugs.Sen. Joseph R. Biden Jr., D-Del., released his own 198-page plan fight drugs a week after the Bush administration presented its annual update on suppressing narcotics. Senate and House committees held separate hearings yesterday to review the administration's plan.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2003
Six months after firing the longtime director of its Bureau of Substance Abuse, Baltimore County has hired a new head for the agency as part of an effort to re-emphasize drug treatment. Kathleen Rebbert-Franklin, who has been program manager of the addiction recovery program at Sinai Hospital for six years, a job in which she oversaw administrative fiscal and clinical components of a 700-person outpatient program, has been hired, Dr. Michelle A. Leverett, the county's health officer, announced this week.
NEWS
October 2, 2005
A workshop on preventing drug abuse, for teenagers ages 11 to 15 and their parents, will be offered at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 25 at the Glenwood branch library, 2350 Route 97, Cooksville. Topics include talking with children about drugs, preventing abuse before it starts, adverse health effects, risk factors, and the legal consequences for substance abuse. The substance abuse prevention coordinator for the Howard County Health Department will facilitate. The program, which will be offered at the Miller branch library in Ellicott City on Oct. 19, is co-sponsored by The Horizon Council and the Howard County Coalition for Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention.
NEWS
By GREGPRY KANE | April 3, 1996
A. Robert Kaufman hurriedly scribbled notes on a pad as Edythe Jones rattled off a list of objections to 6th District Councilman Norman Handy's resolution urging the federal government to treat the drug crisis as a public health issue."
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,Washington Bureau of The Sun | September 20, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Drug abuse is on the rise in Baltimore and many other cities, but not enough federal drug-fighting dollars are reaching these troubled areas, the U.S. Conference of Mayors said yesterday."
NEWS
By Patricia Meisoland Eileen Canzian | December 19, 1990
Hundreds of thousands of dollars to promote amateur athletics in Maryland -- including money intended to bring an Olympic Festival to Maryland -- came from government funds intended to combat drug and alcohol abuse, the dismissed director of the Maryland State Games said yesterday.James E. Narron, who was fired last week amid allegations that he misused money as director of the Maryland State Games, said he acted with the full support of Adele A. Wilzack, the secretary of health and mental hygiene, and her deputies.
BUSINESS
Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2014
A federal judge imposed a six-year sentence Friday on Jacob Theodore George IV, who sold heroin on the online drug bazaar Silk Road. George, 33, an Edgewood man with a history of arrests, drug abuse and mental health problems, apologized to the judge. He said he cried as he confessed to the federal agents who caught him. "I made a bad decision helping with Silk Road," George said, reading from prepared notes. George, who was taken into custody in early 2012, was one of the first dealers on the site to be arrested.
NEWS
August 13, 2014
We were saddened to read about Baltimore County Police Officer Joseph Stanley Harden's arrest on robbery and drug possession charges ( "Off-duty officer tries to break into home in search of drugs, police say," Aug. 1). The veteran officer reportedly told investigators he became addicted to Oxycodone after a work-related injury. While there is a general awareness of prescription drug abuse in our society, most people do not understand the complicated problem of chronic pain syndrome that can lead to prescription drug dependence or addiction.
NEWS
By Robert G. Newman | August 8, 2014
On June 21, the Vatican press office published the presentation made by Pope Francis to the 31st International Drug Enforcement Conference (IDEC) in Rome. The pope told the conferees, "The problem of drug use is not solved with drugs! … Substitute drugs are not an adequate therapy, but rather a veiled means of surrendering to the phenomenon. " These comments represent an unfortunate, categorical rejection of "maintenance" treatment of opioid addiction with medications such as methadone.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2014
A 17-year-old Woodbridge, Va., boy died Sunday evening of an apparent overdose, the second drug fatality following a Merriweather Post Pavilion concert on Friday, Howard County police said. The teen, whom police did not identify at the request of his family, was one of 20 hospitalized after the "Mad Decent Block Party" music festival at the Columbia venue. Authorities identified the man who died Saturday as Tyler Fox Viscardi, 20, of Raleigh, N.C. Police do not believe the two knew each other.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Horseshoe Casino Baltimore's general manager said Tuesday that joint efforts by his company and the city government to recruit local employees for the new gambling center near downtown have paid off, as Baltimore residents have received about half of the 2,200 job offers made so far. It is not clear how many city residents would be hired for the facility's 1,700 to 1,900 full- and part-time jobs because the job offers were made pending background checks...
NEWS
By Nina Miller | June 4, 2014
In March, Anne Arundel County was the first county in Maryland to put the powerful, lifesaving drug naloxone in the hands of its police officers. Naloxone is a safe and effective prescription medicine that reverses an opioid overdose. It can be administered via a simple nasal spray device. Emergency medical professionals have used it for decades, and recently more and more police departments across the country are equipping their officers with the skills and supplies necessary to administer this lifesaving treatment to people suffering from an opioid overdose.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons | November 24, 1991
With no money for drug-addiction programs and the criminal justice system swamped by drug-related cases, "We are losing our fourth generation," a prominent Baltimore lawyer told a mid-Atlantic conference of black physicians yesterday."
NEWS
By Andy Harris | March 31, 2014
Last week, the Maryland Senate approved Senate Bill 364, which would "decriminalize" possession of marijuana. The Senate bill, which passed 36 to 8, would remove criminal penalties for possession of less than 10 grams of marijuana and impose small civil fines, with a provision for the judge to order drug education only after the third offense. The bill has gone to the House of Delegates, where a hearing is scheduled for Tuesday. One could argue that people whose only crime is smoking or possessing a small amount of marijuana should not be punished with an arrest record, which could destroy their chances of getting a job and other benefits later in life.
NEWS
By Sharon Sloane | March 31, 2014
America has crossed a few ominous thresholds that should give us pause. For one, poisonings are killing more people than car crashes in the United States, making them the leading cause of accidental death in the country for the first time. The vast majority of those deaths are from legal, prescription drugs. Second, more children report having been tormented and harassed online than in "real-life"; 43 percent of kids claim to be victims of such cyber-bullying. According to Yale University, victims of bullying are nearly 10 times more likely to consider suicide than non-victims.
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