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By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
When Antonio Malone needed $15,000 to pay off the assailants who stormed his West Baltimore rowhouse and demanded money and heroin, a gang leader told him exactly where to go. Police say he was sent to a 12 t h floor apartment at The Redwood, the home of Felicia "Snoop" Pearson. The building on South Eutaw Street, within walking distance of the Inner Harbor and featuring a large ninth-floor deck and a 'round-the-clock fitness center, seems appropriate for an actress on the much-acclaimed HBO series "The Wire.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 8, 2014
According to a new federal database put online last week, pharmaceutical companies and device makers paid doctors some $380 million in speaking and consulting fees over a five-month period in 2013. Some doctors received over $500,000 each, and some got millions of dollars in royalties from products they helped develop. Doctors claim these payments have no effect on what they prescribe. But why would drug companies shell out all of this money if it didn't provide them a healthy return on their investment?
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NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2011
Felicia "Snoop" Pearson, who overcame a troubled childhood and a murder conviction to launch an acting career as a drug-gang assassin on HBO's "The Wire," pleaded guilty Monday to conspiracy to sell heroin. She was sentenced to seven years in prison, with all of the time suspended except for the five months she has already served while awaiting trial, most of it spent at home, under electronic monitoring. She could be sent back to finish the term if she violates probation over the next three years.
NEWS
October 8, 2014
I think it should be a person's own choice to do whatever drug a person chooses as long as it doesn't involve committing a crime to acquire the drug. When it comes to marijuana, we should be able to have and smoke as much as we like ( "Fixing Md.'s marijuana law," Oct. 3). People like me and many others work very hard for what we have and like to smoke at the end of the day to relax and relieve stress. Ignorant people consider us criminals for doing so. It doesn't kill anyone and it's very helpful to cancer patients going through chemotherapy or radiation treatments.
NEWS
By Gail Gibson and Gail Gibson,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2003
To the dismay of prosecutors, a man considered to be one of the worst drug lords in Baltimore history was freed yesterday of what had been a 22-year sentence for a gun crime and vowed as he walked away from the city's federal courthouse to dedicate his life to serving God. Melvin "Little Melvin" Williams, 61, served nearly four years on a handgun possession conviction before his attorney successfully argued that Williams did not meet the technical requirements...
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | January 15, 2013
Federal authorities announced Tuesday that they had cracked a large suburban Maryland drug organization, arresting 18 people and charging 15 of them with conspiracy to distribute more than a ton of marijuana. According to a federal grand jury indictment, the drug trafficking organization, primarily based in Anne Arundel County, also dealt in cocaine, prescription drugs, steroids and other drugs. Law enforcement officials said they seized at least 30 cars, 60 pounds of marijuana, $300,000 in cash and 35 guns in the investigation.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2010
A former Baltimore disc jockey who was sentenced to 11 years in prison for drug-related charges could now be resentenced for twice as long, per a decision handed down Monday by a federal appeals court. Darnell Anthony Young, also known as "DJ Nelly Nell," was convicted of distribution in 2007 after a jury found that he conspired to distribute more than 500 grams of cocaine, but less than 5 kilograms, giving him a potential sentencing range of between 10 and 12 years. But prosecutors said Young dealt with far larger quantities — 90 to 100 kilograms — that required a prison term of between 19 and 24 years.
NEWS
By Luke Lavoie, llavoie@tribune.com | February 3, 2014
The Laurel man found fatally shot in a pickup truck in North Laurel was shot in the head and is believed to be the target of a drug robbery gone wrong, according to the charging documents produced by Howard County police. Police have charged  Desmick Jermario Lewis, 22, of the 7000 block of Talisman Lane in Columbia; Amanda Nicole McAdoo, 18, of the of 9500 Park Avenue in Laurel; Lauren Elizabeth Maready, 18, of the 12800 block of Lime Kiln Road in Highland; and Taylor King Pepe, 19, of the 8300 block of Sand Cherry Lane in Laurel.  All four, who were charged last week, face first-degree murder charges.  Lewis, who is being held without bond at Howard County Detention Center, is believed to be the trigger man, according to police.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2012
Felicia "Snoop" Pearson , 31. Grew up dealing drugs in East Baltimore and at age 14 killed a youth in a fight. On HBO series "The Wire," played an enforcer for drug organization. Arrested last year as part of a drug sweep and pleaded guilty to conspiracy to sell heroin. Put on probation with a suspended sentence. Shawn Johnson. New York drug supplier described by Pearson as an old friend. Pleaded guilty to being the drug network's main supplier, trafficking in 10-kilogram heroin shipments.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton | January 20, 2012
Steven "J.R. " Blackwell, the leader of an East Baltimore drug conspiracy linked to a yearlong street warwith rivals, was sentenced to 20 years in federal prison Friday as part of a guilty plea he struck with prosecutors last fall. Though he was not charged with any acts of violence, authorities believe Blackwell's organization is tied to a wave of shootings touched off by the abduction in April 2008 of his then-teenage brothers. But Blackwell, 27, still faced up to life in prison after being charged with overseeing a multimillion-dollar heroin conspiracy and laundering the proceeds through gambling winnings in Las Vegas and state lottery tickets.
NEWS
October 7, 2014
It actually doesn't do much good to head up an article about payments to doctors by telling readers that a doctor invented a great new device and the company sent him a check for royalties ( "Payments to doctors from drug companies, device makers revealed," Oct. 4). What would have been helpful is if your reporter had focused on whether the payments were justified instead of solely on the number of dollars. What's news is when device companies send kickbacks to doctors who didn't invent a device but merely used it rather than one from a competing company.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
Late last year, medical device maker Zimmer Holdings Inc. made two large payments to Dr. Andrew N. Pollak, chair of the University of Maryland Medical System's orthopedics department. The payments, one for $47,225 and the other for $45,902, were royalties paid to Pollak for work he did at Maryland Shock Trauma Center starting seven years ago in helping develop a clamp known as a fixator that could hold trauma patient's broken bones straight until they were ready for surgical repair.
NEWS
By Justin George and Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
A Baltimore woman received a 40-year prison sentence Monday in the death of her 1-year-old grandson and abuse of her granddaughter after a judge said she rubbed methadone onto the children's gums before she put them to bed and headed off to a party. Towanda Reaves, 51, took responsibility for the boy's death but said she never meant to kill him. "This is not the intentional killing of her grandson, but those who think this was some form of tragic accident misunderstand the case, and misunderstand the jury's analysis of it," said Baltimore Circuit Judge Timothy Doory.
NEWS
September 28, 2014
McKenzie Elliott, the 3-year-old shot to death in Baltimore, is a recent victim of misguided drug laws ( "Politicians, churchmen talk policing in Northwest Baltimore ," Sept. 9). While I do not support open use of "illegal drugs," I do not find that drug sales or use represent a criminal act. Drug use has long been regarded as a "disabling condition" under the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act. Federal and state law should not superimpose criminal penalties on the known disabled in direct contradiction to the specific intent in these two federal statutes.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
A new anti-violence program led Baltimore police to raid the home of a convicted drug dealer they had hoped to reform, and to nearly $4 million worth of drugs and cash, a significant seizure for the department. Standing over a table displaying $825,000 cash and nearly 12 kilograms of heroin, police officials said Shawn Antonio Hearn, a 41-year-old with a prior federal drug conviction, had been given a chance through the Operation Ceasefire program. He didn't take that chance, they said.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2014
Continuing Maryland's push to stem drug abuse, officials sought Wednesday to refocus the annual prescription "take-back" day on treatment and prevention and away from law enforcement. The nationwide take-back day — which is Saturday — has traditionally been used by its sponsors at the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration to collect expired or unneeded prescription drugs that could be abused if left in family medicine cabinets, or could poison children or pollute the environment.
NEWS
June 10, 2014
We noted an important connection between two separate articles that appeared in the June 4 issue of The Sun. In the article regarding hazing among Towson University cheerleaders ( "Towson U. hazing details released" ), we read that according to investigators, "the women were told they had a choice of doing cocaine or heroin, to test their understanding of team rules. Although no drugs were provided, this was done to let the new members [on the cheerleading team] know that the team was drug free, investigators wrote.
NEWS
By Nayana Davis, The Baltimore Sun | February 3, 2014
Anne Arundel County police arrested several people after allegedly finding illegal drugs in a hotel room in Annapolis Carlos Dewayne Abney Jr., 25, of Annapolis; Lauren Zhane Surgeon, 18, of Annapolis; and William Hunter Hardesty, 26, of Riva were arrested in a room around 1:39 p.m. in the Extended Stay of America in the unit block of Womack Drive. Abney and Surgeon were arrested on charges including possession of controlled dangerous substances with intent to distribute, and Hardesty was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia, all according to online court records.
NEWS
September 17, 2014
When the news of Chris Davis' 25-game suspension broke, a good friend of mine commented that a "player should only be suspended if the drugs are actually working" ( "Orioles' Chris Davis suspended 25 games after testing positive for amphetamine," Sept. 12). In the case of Chris Davis, I think his .196 batting average and 173 strikeouts are proof enough that the Adderall was quite ineffective. Brian J. Spector, Easton - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Kevin Shird | September 17, 2014
"The Heroin Capital of America" - what an unpleasant way to describe Baltimore. But stay seated, I'll get back to that in a second. I want to talk about something else first, "COAP" which stands for Children of Addicted Parents. For some, it's a difficult term to comprehend, but for many of those labeled with it, it's a life sentence. According to the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, children of addicted parents are more likely to exhibit symptoms of depression and anxiety; they're at a higher risk of becoming alcohol and drug abusers due to both genetic and family environment factors; and they experience greater physical and mental health problems and higher health and welfare costs than do children from non-addicted families.
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