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BUSINESS
By LESTER A PICKER | April 15, 1991
The non-profit community has eagerly anticipated the release of a new book by Peter Drucker. Managing the Nonprofit Organization: Practices and Principles (HarperCollins Publishers, New York) is an interesting, if somewhat spotty and often rambling book from the for-profit management guru whose prolific work has been embraced by both Japanese and, more recently, U.S. industry.Mr. Drucker is well-known to U.S. business as an author, lecturer, management consultant and innovator. His books on management, economics and society sit, dog-eared, on the bookshelves of an entire generation of U.S. and Japanese executives.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 12, 2005
Peter F. Drucker, the political economist and author whose view that big business and nonprofit enterprises were the defining innovation of the 20th century led him to pioneering social and management theories, died yesterday at his home in Claremont, Calif. He was 95. Mr. Drucker thought of himself, first and foremost, as a writer and teacher, though he eventually settled on the term "social ecologist." He became internationally renowned for urging corporate leaders to agree with subordinates on objectives and goals and then get out of the way of decisions about how to achieve them.
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NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff writer | December 2, 1991
Like any good basketball coach, South River's Kenny Dunn is open to suggestions from his coaching peers.But as far as he can remember, he has allowed only one student -- senior Craig Drucker -- to openly question his strategy during a game and get away with it."He's even come right out and said 'I don't think that's such a good move, Coach.' And sometimes he's right," said Dunn, now in his 15th year and who, as an assistant to football coach Joe Papetti three years ago, enlisted the freshman Drucker as a team manager.
SPORTS
December 27, 2004
Dick Vitale has a $4 million, nearly 13,000-square-foot home in Lakewood Ranch, Fla. He has a Lexus and a Mercedes bearing the license plates "ESPN 79" and "T-O BABY." He has a private jet. And maybe you think he has an annoying voice. But he's undeniably popular and perhaps as big a name as any college basketball coach or player he talks about on ESPN. Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski says Vitale belongs in the Basketball Hall of Fame. "As a contributor to the game, he deserves to be in," Krzyzewski told the Los Angeles Times.
BUSINESS
By LESTER A. PICKER | August 5, 1991
Listening to Peter F. Drucker's words of wisdom on non-profit organization management is a delight. Listening to his words of wisdom for 25 hours is something less than delightful. In fact, it's downright boring, often repetitious and sometimes irksome.I recently reviewed Mr. Drucker's 25-hour audiotape series called "The Nonprofit Drucker," produced by Leadership Network (P.O. Box 9090, Tyler, Texas 75711. $280 for the entire set; $70 for individual modules). The five-module set covers these topics: Mission and Leadership; Strategies; Performance and Results; People and Relationships; and Managing and Developing Yourself.
BUSINESS
By PHILIP MOELLER and PHILIP MOELLER,SUN BUINESS EDITOR | November 6, 1991
With economic bombs falling daily and consumer confidence diving for cover, it's tempting to consider quick-fix remedies for what are actually long-term problems.For today, at least, you'll be spared my usual sermons on some of these demons -- the deficit, the federal desertion of American cities and our adoption of cultural values that place educating our children somewhere below the joys of still being able to get Roy's fried chicken at Hardee's.Instead, you'll get Peter Drucker, teacher and management expert extraordinaire.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | February 27, 1995
Of the revolutionary works created in the years before World War I, only Schoenberg's chamber-music song cycle continues to startle. Stravinsky's "Sacre" now sounds as listener-friendly as Rimsky-Korsakov's "Scheherazade," Ravel's "Gaspard de la Nuit" as accessible as the Liszt Sonata in B Minor. But as Charles Wuorinen once remarked, listening to "Pierrot" is like trying to "befriend a porcupine."The remark was quoted in Cyrus Ginwala's insightful program note, which accompanied the performance of "Pierrot" he led last night in Towson State University's Concert Hall.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 4, 1993
Last night in the Fine Arts Center of Towson State University, the Towson Chamber Players presented what was essentially a French song recital. Song cycles by Ravel ("Chansons Madecasses") and Poulenc ("Banalites") were the genuine item in that they were written by Frenchmen, but even "Four Fragments" -- a setting of Chaucer in the original Middle English -- by the American Lester Trimble (who studied with Honegger, Milhaud and Boulanger in this country as well as in Paris) had an authentically French sense of color and economy.
NEWS
By Pat Hook and Pat Hook,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 11, 1996
Exuding excitement, the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra held its audience spellbound for the first set of concerts of Gisele Ben-Dor's last season on the podium.The program, performed Friday and Saturday at Maryland Hall for the Performing Arts in Annapolis, opened and closed with showpieces from Russian masters Mussorgsky and Rachmaninoff. It was held together in the middle by Stanley Drucker, principal clarinetist of the New York Philharmonic. Both soloist and conductor appeared sprightly, with plenty of bounce onstage.
SPORTS
December 27, 2004
Dick Vitale has a $4 million, nearly 13,000-square-foot home in Lakewood Ranch, Fla. He has a Lexus and a Mercedes bearing the license plates "ESPN 79" and "T-O BABY." He has a private jet. And maybe you think he has an annoying voice. But he's undeniably popular and perhaps as big a name as any college basketball coach or player he talks about on ESPN. Duke coach Mike Krzyzewski says Vitale belongs in the Basketball Hall of Fame. "As a contributor to the game, he deserves to be in," Krzyzewski told the Los Angeles Times.
BUSINESS
By Jerry Morgan and Jerry Morgan,NEWSDAY | July 19, 1998
Three years ago, Bernard Drucker of East Meadow, N.Y., a financial consultant for more than 40 years, decided to invest some money for one of his grandchildren. So he checked out various funds and settled on American Century's Giftrust.Now, Giftrust is one of those investments that reminds you of the Eagles song "Hotel California": "You can check out anytime you want, but you can never leave." That's because the mutual fund is a trust, and you agree to leave your money in for at least 10 years.
NEWS
By Pat Hook and Pat Hook,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 11, 1996
Exuding excitement, the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra held its audience spellbound for the first set of concerts of Gisele Ben-Dor's last season on the podium.The program, performed Friday and Saturday at Maryland Hall for the Performing Arts in Annapolis, opened and closed with showpieces from Russian masters Mussorgsky and Rachmaninoff. It was held together in the middle by Stanley Drucker, principal clarinetist of the New York Philharmonic. Both soloist and conductor appeared sprightly, with plenty of bounce onstage.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | February 27, 1995
Of the revolutionary works created in the years before World War I, only Schoenberg's chamber-music song cycle continues to startle. Stravinsky's "Sacre" now sounds as listener-friendly as Rimsky-Korsakov's "Scheherazade," Ravel's "Gaspard de la Nuit" as accessible as the Liszt Sonata in B Minor. But as Charles Wuorinen once remarked, listening to "Pierrot" is like trying to "befriend a porcupine."The remark was quoted in Cyrus Ginwala's insightful program note, which accompanied the performance of "Pierrot" he led last night in Towson State University's Concert Hall.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | October 4, 1993
Last night in the Fine Arts Center of Towson State University, the Towson Chamber Players presented what was essentially a French song recital. Song cycles by Ravel ("Chansons Madecasses") and Poulenc ("Banalites") were the genuine item in that they were written by Frenchmen, but even "Four Fragments" -- a setting of Chaucer in the original Middle English -- by the American Lester Trimble (who studied with Honegger, Milhaud and Boulanger in this country as well as in Paris) had an authentically French sense of color and economy.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | March 6, 1993
The sun streaks through a practice room at Essex Community College, adding a sudden dimension of poignancy to the music coming from pianist Walter Hartman, flutist Olga Brunner and cellist Toni Dunlap. Together they are exploring a piece by Bohuslav Martinu, the 20th-century Czech composer.A small man with large, wise hands, Mr. Hartman has been playing piano for 72 years, the last 30 as part of amateur chamber ensembles. Every Saturday, he increases his musical knowledge through the guidance of his chamber music instructor, Arno Drucker, ECC professor and Baltimore Symphony Orchestra pianist.
NEWS
By Special to The Carroll County Sun | February 19, 1992
Pianist Ann Heiligman Saslav, highly regarded both here and abroad for her playing as well as her interest in music appreciation for young people, will make her Western Maryland College debut on Sunday in aSundays of Note performance of the songs of Irving Berlin. The concert will begin at 2 p.m. in McDaniel Hall Lounge. Saslav will provide piano accompaniment for vocalists Ruth Drucker (soprano) and Steven Scheinberg (baritone) on a number of Berlin's most popular songs, as well as on a few that could be called undiscovered treasures.
BUSINESS
By Jerry Morgan and Jerry Morgan,NEWSDAY | July 19, 1998
Three years ago, Bernard Drucker of East Meadow, N.Y., a financial consultant for more than 40 years, decided to invest some money for one of his grandchildren. So he checked out various funds and settled on American Century's Giftrust.Now, Giftrust is one of those investments that reminds you of the Eagles song "Hotel California": "You can check out anytime you want, but you can never leave." That's because the mutual fund is a trust, and you agree to leave your money in for at least 10 years.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | March 6, 1993
The sun streaks through a practice room at Essex Community College, adding a sudden dimension of poignancy to the music coming from pianist Walter Hartman, flutist Olga Brunner and cellist Toni Dunlap. Together they are exploring a piece by Bohuslav Martinu, the 20th-century Czech composer.A small man with large, wise hands, Mr. Hartman has been playing piano for 72 years, the last 30 as part of amateur chamber ensembles. Every Saturday, he increases his musical knowledge through the guidance of his chamber music instructor, Arno Drucker, ECC professor and Baltimore Symphony Orchestra pianist.
NEWS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,Staff writer | December 2, 1991
Like any good basketball coach, South River's Kenny Dunn is open to suggestions from his coaching peers.But as far as he can remember, he has allowed only one student -- senior Craig Drucker -- to openly question his strategy during a game and get away with it."He's even come right out and said 'I don't think that's such a good move, Coach.' And sometimes he's right," said Dunn, now in his 15th year and who, as an assistant to football coach Joe Papetti three years ago, enlisted the freshman Drucker as a team manager.
BUSINESS
By PHILIP MOELLER and PHILIP MOELLER,SUN BUINESS EDITOR | November 6, 1991
With economic bombs falling daily and consumer confidence diving for cover, it's tempting to consider quick-fix remedies for what are actually long-term problems.For today, at least, you'll be spared my usual sermons on some of these demons -- the deficit, the federal desertion of American cities and our adoption of cultural values that place educating our children somewhere below the joys of still being able to get Roy's fried chicken at Hardee's.Instead, you'll get Peter Drucker, teacher and management expert extraordinaire.
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