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By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Baltimore continues to lead area school systems in improving its dropout rate, and most districts in the region are making progress in graduating more students in four years, according to new high school data released Monday by the Maryland State Department of Education. Statewide, the Class of 2012 saw steady growth in the percentage of students who earned a high school diploma in four years at 83.6 percent, up from 82.8 percent of students who graduated in 2011. Meanwhile, the number of students who dropped out in 2012 fell to 10.3 percent, down from 11.2 percent, according to the department.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Maryland's high school graduation rate has been climbing steadily for the past four years and reached nearly 85 percent — far above the national average — this past June, according to data released Tuesday. More students from every corner of the state are staying in school to earn a diploma, but the increases were most pronounced among Hispanic and African-American students. State education officials credited the passage of Maryland's Dream Act, which gave hope to Hispanic students who want to attend college in the state, as one of the factors for the 2.5 percentage point increase in the graduation rate for Hispanics.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | August 26, 2009
Maryland's dropout rate declined by about half a percentage point in the past year to the lowest rate in recent years, although state officials say the decrease may have been the result of better data collection rather than a change in the numbers of students leaving school. This past year, 2.8 percent of students in Maryland high schools dropped out, down from 3.7 percent in 2005. There was a 2 percentage-point decline for African-Americans in the same period, the greatest decline among racial groups.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | June 6, 2013
Baltimore County had the second-highest graduation rate among large districts in the nation in 2010, according to a report released Thursday that has annually scrutinized graduates differently than most states, which also found that Baltimore City has drastically improved from being among the worst rates in the nation. The data was published in an annual report compiled by the trade publication “Education Week,” which analyzes high school completion data published by the U.S. Department of Education, and calculates rates based on a formula that seeks to capture how many students obtain a diploma in four years.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 28, 2003
CATHERINE PUGH had a privileged childhood. Growing up in a tough neighborhood on the west side of Philadelphia, the future Baltimore City Council member had a mother who taught reading and writing and discipline to her seven children, a father who worked every day in a rubber plant, and a Santa Claus who showed up at midnight every Christmas Eve. Pugh says she believed in Santa until she was 12 years old. This makes her a late bloomer and, at heart, an...
NEWS
November 16, 1993
Maryland public schools received higher marks in the state's fourth annual report card yesterday, but most still fall short of ambitious state standards.The results -- based on state tests, promotion and dropout rates, and attendance -- form the basis for the Maryland School Performance Program, designed to hold schools more accountable for classroom results.In the metropolitan area, only Howard County met all 13 state standards, while the city of Baltimore fell short in all but two areas.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | October 31, 1993
Carroll Commissioner Julia W. Gouge will go to San Francisco next month to talk to county officials from throughout the country about Carroll programs that aim to keep students in school.Mrs. Gouge will speak at the National Association of Counties' annual conference on employment policy and human services Nov. 19-22.She is a member of NACo's employment committee and chairs a subcommittee on "school-to-work" programs.About 700 people are expected to attend the conference at the San Francisco Hilton and Towers, NACo Public Affairs Director Tom Goodman said.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
Maryland's public schools are graduating a higher percentage of students than they have in the past 15 years but they have seen a troubling increase in the number of students dropping out. School officials attributed the higher dropout rate to the poor economy. More than one-third of students now qualify for subsidized or free meals in school, and principals say they see more students with jobs after school and families under increased financial stress. "Economic pressures have historically had an adverse affect on continued enrollment in high school," said Bill Reinhard, a spokesman for the Maryland State Department of Education.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Su | October 6, 2010
More Maryland high school students are graduating and fewer are dropping out than two years ago, defying critics of the state's graduation testing requirement who feared the tougher standards would drive kids to leave school or fail. The dropout rate, which fell in 16 Maryland school districts this year, took a particularly steep dive in Baltimore City, where nearly 1,500 fewer students left high school last year than in 2007, according to data released by the state Wednesday. At 4 percent, the city's dropout rate is now half what it was three years ago, a swift decline that won praise from education experts.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
Maryland students earned diplomas last year at the highest rate in recent history, according to data released Wednesday by the state Department of Education, which also unveiled a new system of tracking graduates and dropouts. Under the new "cohort" system, which follows students from ninth grade until they graduate, 83 percent of those who started high school in 2007-2008 graduated in 2011, up from 82 percent in 2010. Those who completed high school in five years also rose, from 85 percent to 86 percent.
NEWS
February 14, 2013
The latest statistics from the Maryland State Department of Education show Baltimore City making steady progress toward increasing the number of students who finish high school. Last year city schools awarded 149 more diplomas than in 2011, and the city's 3.3 percentage point decline in dropouts was the largest in the region. That's great news for all the teachers, principals and school staff who have worked so hard to get the city's schools back on track. Since his arrival in Baltimore six years ago, schools CEO Andrés Alonso has made boosting high school graduation rates a priority of his reform effort, and during that period the schools' dropout rate has declined by more than half.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Baltimore continues to lead area school systems in improving its dropout rate, and most districts in the region are making progress in graduating more students in four years, according to new high school data released Monday by the Maryland State Department of Education. Statewide, the Class of 2012 saw steady growth in the percentage of students who earned a high school diploma in four years at 83.6 percent, up from 82.8 percent of students who graduated in 2011. Meanwhile, the number of students who dropped out in 2012 fell to 10.3 percent, down from 11.2 percent, according to the department.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green and Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2012
Maryland students earned diplomas last year at the highest rate in recent history, according to data released Wednesday by the state Department of Education, which also unveiled a new system of tracking graduates and dropouts. Under the new "cohort" system, which follows students from ninth grade until they graduate, 83 percent of those who started high school in 2007-2008 graduated in 2011, up from 82 percent in 2010. Those who completed high school in five years also rose, from 85 percent to 86 percent.
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | December 12, 2011
The appeal of Howard County's vaunted public school system, according to David Rodriguez, can be explained by borrowing the famous line from "A Field of Dreams," the 1989 film about an Iowa farmer who erects a baseball diamond in his cornfield. Expanding on "if you build it, they will come," Rodriguez says the county has built a safe environment that attracts families with high academic goals for their children, and it has sustained this highly regarded reputation over the years.
NEWS
October 3, 2011
The rapid improvement during the last few years in Baltimore City's graduation rate is both proof that the reforms taking place in the school system are working and a lasting boon to the city in the form of a population of young men and women who face a much brighter future than they would have otherwise. Figures released by the city school department last week show that since 2007, the high-school dropout rate has been cut by more than half, while the proportion of graduates has risen steadily.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2011
Maryland's public schools are graduating a higher percentage of students than they have in the past 15 years but they have seen a troubling increase in the number of students dropping out. School officials attributed the higher dropout rate to the poor economy. More than one-third of students now qualify for subsidized or free meals in school, and principals say they see more students with jobs after school and families under increased financial stress. "Economic pressures have historically had an adverse affect on continued enrollment in high school," said Bill Reinhard, a spokesman for the Maryland State Department of Education.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff Writer | November 17, 1993
Annapolis High School has the worst dropout rate among Anne Arundel County's 12 high schools, according to a state report card issued this week. But Principal Laura Webb says the numbers don't reflect economics or recent progress."
NEWS
September 19, 1992
Baltimore has been proclaimed tops in the nation recently -- for all the wrong reasons.* The National Center on Institutions and Alternatives (NCIA) reported that 56 percent of black men in the city between the ages of 18 and 35 were either in prison, on parole or probation, being sought on arrest warrants or awaiting trial on an average day in 1991. That was worse than the other city studied to date, Washington, D.C., where 42 percent of young black men were caught in the criminal justice web on a given day. Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke expressed shock that Baltimore's problem outdid Washington's, but a survey by his own staff confirmed the study.
NEWS
May 11, 2011
Regarding Fred Millar's Op-Ed commentary about the "cooling out" of poor and minority kids in community colleges ("'Cooling out' poor, minority kids in community college," May 9), I was surprised at how the author was unaware of or chose to ignore so many other factors in order to make his point. I have taken several courses at our community college, which has grown tremendously over the years. The quality of the teaching is often very high. Throughout the program, the choice is always the student's whether to get into a certificate program or take the basic courses in order to transfer to a four-year college.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2011
When Dorian Teal wanted to turn his life around, the high-school dropout decided he didn't just want to be great, he wanted to be educated. The now-20-year-old student, who dropped out of Edmondson-Westside High School two years ago, is among the more than 2,000 students who have made their way back to the Baltimore school system in the past three years to take advantage of the Great Kids Come Back campaign, an effort launched by the school system...
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