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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | March 11, 2007
Thursday's bitter early-morning cold triggered rare forecasts for "freezing fog" in Western Maryland. "What in the world is that?" one puzzled Ruxton reader asked. Plain old fog occurs when rising humidity reaches 100 percent, and water vapor in the air condenses into fine droplets - a cloud at ground level. With nothing to freeze onto, those droplets will stay liquid down to 14 degrees. But when they touch a surface at that temperature, they form beautiful, feathery ice crystals called "rime."
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 7, 2013
A new study has found more evidence that people may catch the flu through airborne particles and not just direct or indirect contact with a person who has the virus. The study from the University of Maryland School of Public Health also found that when flu patients wear a surgical mask, spread of the virus in even the smallest airborne droplets is significantly reduced. The study was published Thursday ini the journal PLOS Pathogens. Our study provides new evidence that there is nearly nine times more influenza virus present in the smallest airborne droplets in the breath exhaled from those infected with flu than in the larger droplets that would be expected to carry more virus,” said Dr. Donald Milton, lead author of the study who also directs the Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health.
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NEWS
By Bernie Glendon | May 8, 1995
Yellow, soft and sweet,She rises out of the glass canyonThat imprisons her naked body.Twisting and bending, she strugglesThrough the dense green jungleTill she aloneStands,Facing the sun,Yellow, soft and sweet,Tall, straight and proud,She blushes with the beautyOf a thousand dropletsDancing before the sun.Defying life with her opennessShe reveals her inner wonder.Only to die to the rhythm ofShe loves me . . . she lovesnot . . .
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | October 24, 2009
Russell Loy writes from Cockeysville: "Please explain how the reported humidity can be 93 percent and it is raining; and another day [it is] 100 percent, and it is NOT raining?" If it's raining, you can bet the relative humidity is 100 percent high above your head, if not at your instruments. But even if your hygrometer reads 100 percent, it won't rain if the droplets are so small they remain suspended in the air (fog).
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | March 7, 2013
A new study has found more evidence that people may catch the flu through airborne particles and not just direct or indirect contact with a person who has the virus. The study from the University of Maryland School of Public Health also found that when flu patients wear a surgical mask, spread of the virus in even the smallest airborne droplets is significantly reduced. The study was published Thursday ini the journal PLOS Pathogens. Our study provides new evidence that there is nearly nine times more influenza virus present in the smallest airborne droplets in the breath exhaled from those infected with flu than in the larger droplets that would be expected to carry more virus,” said Dr. Donald Milton, lead author of the study who also directs the Maryland Institute for Applied Environmental Health.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2005
It's a game that transports players into the caldrons of sorcery, unleashing trolls, minotaurs, nameless abysses, vampire trainers, fanged rats with dripping saliva and hulking monsters with ram horns. But in a card game that often honors creatures that can quickly slash flesh or rip out hearts, Antonino De Rosa, 23, of Port St. Lucie, Fla., advanced to the "Magic: The Gathering" national championship in Baltimore yesterday using a trio of serene, human-feline hybrids pleasantly named "sun droplets."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 26, 1995
After sifting clues for five years, a team of scientific sleuths has found that puzzling clouds of junk orbiting the Earth are made up of radioactive debris leaking from a large group of orbiting Soviet nuclear reactors.It is the first major case of nuclear pollution in space and one of the messiest environmental legacies of the Cold War.The atomic debris, estimated at 70,000 detectable particles and perhaps millions of smaller ones, poses no danger to people, experts say. But it threatens to damage working satellites and will force engineers to add more shielding to help protect new spacecraft.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | August 24, 2008
A frenzy of golden energy, Michael Phelps exited the pool, shaking water off his lithe and lean body. Onto the pool deck splashed the droplets -- those Baltimore roots, the memories from Greece and the immaculate show he had just put on in China. It all gathered together beautifully and perfectly in a puddle. The swimmer made of gold had made history. In winning his eighth gold medal of these Olympics, Phelps broke Mark Spitz's 36-year-old record, a mark once thought untouchable. "This is all a dream come true," an emotional Phelps said.
TOPIC
By Beverly A. Kaiser | July 29, 2001
MANY OF TODAY'S Southern inner cities are war zones where young men and women get cut down before their lives barely begin. Growing up in Western Heights, a Knoxville, Tenn., public housing project where abrupt violence was commonplace, I quickly learned to avoid certain street corners and the so-called "bad people." I eventually developed my own survival map, which I hoped would guide me to adulthood. My map, however, couldn't help me navigate all inner-city dangers. Severe hazards seeped through bolted doors, barred windows, and corroding pipes.
NEWS
By ERNEST F. IMHOFF | June 20, 1993
Drip. Drip. Drip. The Evening Sun droplets of discontent continue.Marcia Rubin, of Randallstown, gets her news from TV in the morning, works during the day and relaxes at night with The Evening Sun. She switched when The News American died in 1986. One recent day she was off. The paper came at 10:20 a.m. ''That's crazy. . . . What good is that?''Della Shanahan, of Pasadena, says, ''I liked The Evening Sun better when it was a newspaper. I like Dan Rodricks and the editorial pages, but forget it for the latest news.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | August 24, 2008
A frenzy of golden energy, Michael Phelps exited the pool, shaking water off his lithe and lean body. Onto the pool deck splashed the droplets -- those Baltimore roots, the memories from Greece and the immaculate show he had just put on in China. It all gathered together beautifully and perfectly in a puddle. The swimmer made of gold had made history. In winning his eighth gold medal of these Olympics, Phelps broke Mark Spitz's 36-year-old record, a mark once thought untouchable. "This is all a dream come true," an emotional Phelps said.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | August 15, 2005
It's a game that transports players into the caldrons of sorcery, unleashing trolls, minotaurs, nameless abysses, vampire trainers, fanged rats with dripping saliva and hulking monsters with ram horns. But in a card game that often honors creatures that can quickly slash flesh or rip out hearts, Antonino De Rosa, 23, of Port St. Lucie, Fla., advanced to the "Magic: The Gathering" national championship in Baltimore yesterday using a trio of serene, human-feline hybrids pleasantly named "sun droplets."
TOPIC
By Beverly A. Kaiser | July 29, 2001
MANY OF TODAY'S Southern inner cities are war zones where young men and women get cut down before their lives barely begin. Growing up in Western Heights, a Knoxville, Tenn., public housing project where abrupt violence was commonplace, I quickly learned to avoid certain street corners and the so-called "bad people." I eventually developed my own survival map, which I hoped would guide me to adulthood. My map, however, couldn't help me navigate all inner-city dangers. Severe hazards seeped through bolted doors, barred windows, and corroding pipes.
NEWS
By Bernie Glendon | May 8, 1995
Yellow, soft and sweet,She rises out of the glass canyonThat imprisons her naked body.Twisting and bending, she strugglesThrough the dense green jungleTill she aloneStands,Facing the sun,Yellow, soft and sweet,Tall, straight and proud,She blushes with the beautyOf a thousand dropletsDancing before the sun.Defying life with her opennessShe reveals her inner wonder.Only to die to the rhythm ofShe loves me . . . she lovesnot . . .
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | February 26, 1995
After sifting clues for five years, a team of scientific sleuths has found that puzzling clouds of junk orbiting the Earth are made up of radioactive debris leaking from a large group of orbiting Soviet nuclear reactors.It is the first major case of nuclear pollution in space and one of the messiest environmental legacies of the Cold War.The atomic debris, estimated at 70,000 detectable particles and perhaps millions of smaller ones, poses no danger to people, experts say. But it threatens to damage working satellites and will force engineers to add more shielding to help protect new spacecraft.
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