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By KEVIN COWHERD | March 12, 1998
WHEN IT comes to airline travel, the old saying is true: There's no hell like having a baby sitting near you.I was reminded of this when a baby sat in front of me on a recent flight to the Midwest.OK, I say sat. Actually the baby was perched over his father's shoulder facing me. Which meant his fat, little drool-covered face was about 6 inches from mine.Now, normally I have no problem with drooling babies, figuring drooling is simply their occupational hazard.But I sure had a problem with this baby.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jessica Berthold and Jessica Berthold,The Morning Call | January 18, 2007
Just as cooking shows succeed or fail based on the personality of the host, a cooking blog prospers only when the writer's voice entices. That's the case with the Domestic Goddess (www.domestic goddess.ca), whose tone is as warm and comforting as the smell of baking bread. The blog's design is fresh, the food photos are scrumptious, and the dessert-focused recipes are simple to understand. But it's the Goddess' ability to tie any subject from her personal life to food that makes her blog such a treat to read.
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SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | August 18, 2006
Apparently, there has been a big misunderstanding. I went out of my way to welcome Philadelphia Eagles fans back to Baltimore the other day, and my effort seems to have been misconstrued as some kind of insult to the good, football-obsessed people from the City of Brotherly Love. I certainly didn't get much love after my column was posted on some Eagles fan sites. I got about a hundred angry e-mails, most of them summed up in this line from a reader who - understandably - did not want to be identified: "I don't have anything against people from Baltimore, but ignorant people like you belong in Hell."
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | August 18, 2006
Apparently, there has been a big misunderstanding. I went out of my way to welcome Philadelphia Eagles fans back to Baltimore the other day, and my effort seems to have been misconstrued as some kind of insult to the good, football-obsessed people from the City of Brotherly Love. I certainly didn't get much love after my column was posted on some Eagles fan sites. I got about a hundred angry e-mails, most of them summed up in this line from a reader who - understandably - did not want to be identified: "I don't have anything against people from Baltimore, but ignorant people like you belong in Hell."
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | September 24, 2000
Light-headed Blondes. It seems everybody's got an opinion of them. They're too dumb, too vampish, too unattainable, too fake, too wholesome, or just too, too perfect. But they're never bland, says a new book by Kathy Phillips, the health and beauty director of Vogue. "The Vogue Book of Blondes" (Viking Studio, $24.95) explores the psychology, science and art of being blonde -- natural or otherwise -- and gives up the gossip about our flaxen faves. For example, did you know Jean Harlow, the famous 1930s golden girl, wore a wig?
SPORTS
By Bill Free and Bill Free,Staff Writer | March 25, 1993
Fifteen returning seniors is enough to make any high schoo girls lacrosse coach want to do cartwheels.Westminster coach Suzanne Peters is no exception.There's only one problem for Peters.Her baby girl was born four weeks prematurely last Sunday, and she might not get to coach the team that has other county coaches drooling.Peters will turn the squad over to assistant Amanda Bodden for the first five to six weeks. Then Peters will decide if she wants to come back for the final weeks of the season.
NEWS
August 13, 2002
Put a stop to the greed of trial lawyers Jonathan Turley's column "Lawyers drooling over big fat awards" (Opinion * Commentary, Aug. 1) was right on target. Greedy personal injury lawyers have found a new victim in their hunt for multimillion-dollar jackpots -- the fast-food industry. It's no secret that greasy hamburgers and super-sized french fries are bad for our health. We have known that for years. And we must take responsibility for what we choose to put in our mouths. There is no one else to blame.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2003
Carroll County's business leaders left their stuffy offices yesterday for the wide-open spaces of some of the county's largest farms. They fed calves, petted foals and counted how many piglets one sow could suckle. When they returned to the Carroll County Agriculture Center to wash up for a home-style fried chicken lunch, they all had tales to tell. "I had cows licking my fingers," said Kathy Menasche, director of continuing education at Carroll Community College. "I'll trade you some horse spit," said Jim Steele, manager of Shamrock Farms in Woodbine and vice president of the Carroll County Farm Bureau.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 18, 1994
On Saturday, the day after 500 state troopers and National Guardsmen stormed The Block in the name of fighting crime, the place looked like a ghost town. Yesterday at City Hall, they must have been doing cartwheels over such a fact. But this raid wasn't about crime. It was about instant urban renewal.For years, the city's been drooling over the real estate in the 400 block of E. Baltimore St., to convert grubby, ancient, two-story joints into towering, high-rent office buildings.So Friday night, the bump-and-grind of unclothed ladies was jolted by the barking of police dogs, the arrests of 52 people and the shutting down of 24 establishments.
NEWS
By Tony Snow | November 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton and Tony Blair, the twin towers of Nouveau Liberalism, recently have experienced contemporaneous spasms of public dyspepsia.Prime Minister Blair entertained the British public recently by hinting that his political opponents were guilty of, among other things, the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.He also labeled Prince Charles a "goon" for refusing on human-rights grounds to dine with Chinese President Jiang Zemin.Mr. Clinton in similar fashion has tossed the race card on the table with unseemly liberality, claiming that bigotry was responsible for the Senate's decision not to elevate a Missouri judge to the federal bench.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2003
Carroll County's business leaders left their stuffy offices yesterday for the wide-open spaces of some of the county's largest farms. They fed calves, petted foals and counted how many piglets one sow could suckle. When they returned to the Carroll County Agriculture Center to wash up for a home-style fried chicken lunch, they all had tales to tell. "I had cows licking my fingers," said Kathy Menasche, director of continuing education at Carroll Community College. "I'll trade you some horse spit," said Jim Steele, manager of Shamrock Farms in Woodbine and vice president of the Carroll County Farm Bureau.
NEWS
August 13, 2002
Put a stop to the greed of trial lawyers Jonathan Turley's column "Lawyers drooling over big fat awards" (Opinion * Commentary, Aug. 1) was right on target. Greedy personal injury lawyers have found a new victim in their hunt for multimillion-dollar jackpots -- the fast-food industry. It's no secret that greasy hamburgers and super-sized french fries are bad for our health. We have known that for years. And we must take responsibility for what we choose to put in our mouths. There is no one else to blame.
NEWS
By Jonathan Turley | August 1, 2002
WASHINGTON -- Leave it to lawyers to combine the two favorite American pastimes: eating and suing. In various states, lawsuits have been filed or are being planned against the fast-food industry. Lawyers who recently received windfalls in fees from tobacco lawsuits are now eyeing fast food as the next opportunity for super-size awards. With the exception of tobacco, there are few things that kill more people than overeating. Obesity caused more than 300,000 deaths in 2000. That same year, obesity resulted in $117 billion in health care costs.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | September 24, 2000
Light-headed Blondes. It seems everybody's got an opinion of them. They're too dumb, too vampish, too unattainable, too fake, too wholesome, or just too, too perfect. But they're never bland, says a new book by Kathy Phillips, the health and beauty director of Vogue. "The Vogue Book of Blondes" (Viking Studio, $24.95) explores the psychology, science and art of being blonde -- natural or otherwise -- and gives up the gossip about our flaxen faves. For example, did you know Jean Harlow, the famous 1930s golden girl, wore a wig?
NEWS
By Tony Snow | November 10, 1999
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton and Tony Blair, the twin towers of Nouveau Liberalism, recently have experienced contemporaneous spasms of public dyspepsia.Prime Minister Blair entertained the British public recently by hinting that his political opponents were guilty of, among other things, the assassination of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.He also labeled Prince Charles a "goon" for refusing on human-rights grounds to dine with Chinese President Jiang Zemin.Mr. Clinton in similar fashion has tossed the race card on the table with unseemly liberality, claiming that bigotry was responsible for the Senate's decision not to elevate a Missouri judge to the federal bench.
FEATURES
By KEVIN COWHERD | March 12, 1998
WHEN IT comes to airline travel, the old saying is true: There's no hell like having a baby sitting near you.I was reminded of this when a baby sat in front of me on a recent flight to the Midwest.OK, I say sat. Actually the baby was perched over his father's shoulder facing me. Which meant his fat, little drool-covered face was about 6 inches from mine.Now, normally I have no problem with drooling babies, figuring drooling is simply their occupational hazard.But I sure had a problem with this baby.
NEWS
By Myron Beckenstein | April 16, 1991
WHEN WE LEFT "Long Walk Home" my wife was not in a good mood. She said the movie made her think of what it was like during that part of the civil rights wars and got her angry all over again. I am not sure if Martin Luther King or the film's writer would approve.But it does show how effective the movie is. Unlike some of the more heavily promoted movie and TV films that rely heavily on famous events, famous clashes or famous imaginings, "Long Walk Home" is about ordinary people and shows how the black and white communities initially were affected by Rosa Park's decision 35 years ago not to sit in the back of the bus anymore, a move that ended up affecting us all.The main characters are a pair of Montgomery, Ala., women, the black played by Whoopi Goldberg and the white by Sissy Spacek.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | January 4, 1993
Mike Royko is on vacation. During his absence, one of hi favorite columns is being run. This was originally published Oct. 28, 1985.He was bent over a sink in the office men's room, poking a finger into his eye and muttering.I asked him what was wrong."The air. Must be a lot of pollution or something. It goofs up my contact lenses.No, I scoffed, his problem wasn't the air. His problem was the vanity of those who insist on wearing contact lenses because they think it makes them look better and conceals a minor physical flaw.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | October 12, 1997
McDonogh's junior midfielder Jon Cole has been the Eagles' Jonny on the spot this season.Put him on defense, he's an effective stopper there. Put him in the midfield, he'll make the offense flow. Let him go up front, and he'll put the ball in the net -- or help someone else to do it.And if you ask Calvert Hall coach Bill Karpovich, it's because Cole's "not a complicated player" that he is able to execute so effectively."The big thing about Jon that I really like is how simply he plays the game.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | January 18, 1994
On Saturday, the day after 500 state troopers and National Guardsmen stormed The Block in the name of fighting crime, the place looked like a ghost town. Yesterday at City Hall, they must have been doing cartwheels over such a fact. But this raid wasn't about crime. It was about instant urban renewal.For years, the city's been drooling over the real estate in the 400 block of E. Baltimore St., to convert grubby, ancient, two-story joints into towering, high-rent office buildings.So Friday night, the bump-and-grind of unclothed ladies was jolted by the barking of police dogs, the arrests of 52 people and the shutting down of 24 establishments.
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