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By Knight-Ridder | October 3, 1990
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- In the past three years, NASCAR drive Rob Moroso was convicted of speeding four times and once for '' driving on the wrong side of the road.Judges could have revoked his license at least twice since March 30, 1989, according to North Carolina driving records.Instead, charges were reduced and, in the most recent case, Mecklenburg County District Judge William Scarborough ordered a prayer for judgment continued, which kept points off Moroso's driving record.Moroso, 22, considered NASCAR's next great driver, lost control of his 1990 Oldsmobile Cutlass, killing himself and the driver of a second car on N.C. 150 just west of Mooresville about 11 p.m. Sunday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
A few years ago, the History Channel was best known to some as a punch line on HBO's “The Sopranos.” Remember mobster Tony Soprano sitting alone late at night in his New Jersey McMansion eating ice cream and watching World War II documentaries about Adolph Hitler and Winston Churchill? These days, no one is laughing at the History Channel - not with audiences like the 13.1 million viewers who tuned in last Sunday for the first two hours of “The Bible,” a 10-hour miniseries that runs through Easter Sunday.
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NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | June 9, 1998
A Westminster man charged in a fatal drag race on Route 140 last week has accumulated 26 points on his Maryland driving record in the past three years, prosecutors say.And a Parkville man charged in the accident has been cited for speeding twice, police say.Frederick H. Hensen Jr., 21, of the 700 block of Old Westminster Pike, Westminster, was being held yesterday in lieu of $25,000 bail after his arrest Friday on auto manslaughter and related charges.According...
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | June 15, 2009
Last week this column explored the colorful driving record of Bruce C. Bereano, super-lobbyist, mail fraudster and chronic speeder. It recounted how Bereano has amassed 22 traffic tickets over the past 13 years - nine of them for racing along at 80 mph or more. Readers were not amused. Not at Bereano. Not at the judges who handed him probation before judgment (PBJ) in spite of an abysmal driving record. "Bruce Bereano has been getting away with antics that the common man or woman would be in jail for," writes Lois Raimondi Munchel of Forest Hill.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | February 2, 2000
A three-judge panel upheld yesterday a five-year sentence that a Westminster man received for his role in causing the death of a Carroll County teacher while he and two others were speeding on Route 140 in June 1998. The driving record of Frederick H. Hensen Jr., 22, one of two men convicted by a jury of auto manslaughter in the death of Geraldine "Geri" Lane Wu, was the worst of any 21-year-old the judges had seen, they wrote in a four-page opinion. "The record makes it obvious that Mr. Hensen was a menace on the highway," the panel -- retired Circuit Judge Francis M. Arnold, District Judge Marc G. Rasinsky, and Circuit Judge Michael M. Galloway -- wrote.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2002
Concerned about liability and insurance costs, the Carroll County commissioners decided yesterday to require a complete driving record from prospective employees who would operate a county vehicle on a daily basis. The commissioners demand a three-year driving history from prospective employees during the interview process. Expanding that requirement to a full history would cost the county about $10 to $15 per applicant. "We've found that the three-year record may be clean, but in the fourth year or further back, there were problems," said Steven D. Powell, director of the county's Department of Management and Budget.
NEWS
December 12, 1991
Sadiq Martin's fatal confrontation with Baltimore County police last September was not the first time he refused to stop his car when ordered to do so by uniformed officers.Last May 16, Martin led police on a high-speed chase through Baltimore. City police said they used a helicopter to keep track of Martin as he drove his mother's 1988 Dodge Raider in excess of 90 mph.Martin was driving the Raider on Sept. 23 when he was killed by a county officer responding to an alleged car break-in outside Woodlawn High School.
NEWS
July 24, 1999
In an article July 17 about Brenda Davis, a Mass Transit Administration bus driver and church pastor who advises, prays for, and sings with her passengers, MTA spokesman Frank Fulton, was quoted: "We're real proud of her. She represents the standards of bus operators that we like to encourage." Fulton was speaking only of her driving record and not endorsing religious activities on the bus.Pub Date: 7/24/99
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1998
A Bel Air man who has accumulated 242 points on his Maryland driving record since 1977 was sentenced yesterday to 14 months in the Carroll County Detention Center for driving while intoxicated and with a revoked license.Paul F. Mitten won't begin that sentence until he serves concurrent 12-month sentences for driving-related offenses in Anne Arundel and Howard counties.Mitten, 40, pleaded not guilty, but agreed to accept the prosecutor's statement of the facts.Carroll Circuit Judge Francis M. Arnold told Mitten it didn't appear that he had been encouraged to stay off the road when drinking and when his license was revoked.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1997
Anne Arundel County school administrators will review procedures for hiring bus drivers in the wake of the arrest on suspicion of drunken driving of a driver who allegedly had a hit-and-run accident Friday and left two empty malt liquor bottles aboard the bus."It's an unforgivable incident," said Winship Wheatley, supervisor of transportation for the county schools. "I think parents should be concerned, and we are, too."But Wheatley said a preliminary review of the driving record of Robert Edward Manokey, which includes a 1995 violation and a temporary license suspension, turned up nothing that would automatically have disqualified him."
NEWS
June 10, 2009
No AC? See how you like it I have a suggestion. Let the people who came to the conclusion the AC wasn't needed [at Ridgely Middle School] work in the school over the summer and see if they feel that way. Ravensfan59 No need for AC Unless the school district is shifting to a 12 month schedule then there is no way to justify the expense of providing air conditioning (equipment or power bills) for the very small percentage of days that justify its use. Finding ways to reduce discomfort on the marginal days and eliminating outright those days that are beyond marginal from the schedule are where the solutions lie. In the meantime, replace or modify those windows at Ridgely.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun Reporter | June 19, 2008
No driver's license? No problem. Or so 55-year-old Richard Samuel Dorsey Jr. seems to think. The Annapolis-area man has been convicted six times of driving on a revoked or suspended license. He also has three DUIs, more than a dozen traffic convictions and 40 instances of failing to appear in court, police say. Yet there he was Tuesday evening, driving around the state capital in a cream-colored Cadillac until an officer pulled him over for speeding. "The guy cooperated - I guess he's used to it," said Officer Hal Dalton, a spokesman for the Annapolis Police Department.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER | February 5, 2007
If you should get a traffic ticket in Baltimore County and your driving record is less than stellar, think twice about going to trial if Judge I. Marshall Seidler is on the bench. Just go to the window and pay. In response to complaints that some traffic judges were too lenient, I recently paid a visit to Baltimore County District Court in Towson. What I found in this case was one tough, consistent and fair judge. He's retired now and only hears cases when he chooses, but perhaps some of his junior colleagues could take lessons.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN STAFF | April 22, 2005
Howard County officials are considering a strict policy that could deny school parking permits to teenagers with blemishes on their driving records, part of a campaign to curb the number of teens killed in car accidents. School Superintendent Sydney L. Cousin will meet with Police Chief G. Wayne Livesay next week to discuss that idea, as well as a mandatory safety seminar for students wanting to drive to school and for their parents. "We want a parking permit to be a privilege rather than a right, and for students to realize that there's responsibilities that go along with having one," Cousin said.
NEWS
December 1, 2003
WHO ARE you? For whom do you work? Why do you want this? Far too often state employees initially respond with that kind of impermissible counter-questioning when citizens show up asking for all kinds of public records to which they are clearly entitled under the long-standing Maryland Public Information Act (PIA). And far too often that's just the start of the ineptness, stalling or outright resistance that ensues for citizens seeking everyday public records -- documents like any driver's three-year driving record, a list of teachers whose certifications have been revoked, or complaints against real estate appraisers.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2002
Concerned about liability and insurance costs, the Carroll County commissioners decided yesterday to require a complete driving record from prospective employees who would operate a county vehicle on a daily basis. The commissioners demand a three-year driving history from prospective employees during the interview process. Expanding that requirement to a full history would cost the county about $10 to $15 per applicant. "We've found that the three-year record may be clean, but in the fourth year or further back, there were problems," said Steven D. Powell, director of the county's Department of Management and Budget.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1997
A Carroll County judge, charged with driving with a suspended license, was given probation before judgment and ordered to pay $485 in fines and court costs after pleading guilty yesterday.Luke K. Burns Jr., the senior judge in Maryland's 5th Judicial Circuit, stood quietly with head bowed. Lloyd O. Whitehead, a district judge from Wicomico County, said he would treat Burns like anyone else who came before him on charges of driving while his license was suspended, negligent driving and failing to control speed to avoid a collision.
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Staff Writer | February 18, 1993
A man serving time in the Carroll County Detention Center for driving on a suspended license was sentenced Tuesday to two years in state prison on similar charges.Brian Lamotte Magruder, 23, was found guilty after he agreed to a police statement of facts during a hearing before Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. in county Circuit Court.Mr. Magruder has now been convicted of three drivers license violations in the past year. He also faces charges of driving with a suspended license in Baltimore County, his defense attorney, Stephen J. Bourexis, said yesterday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2001
If you're a couch potato, get yourself a comfy office chair as well, because these days you can sit at your computer and participate in America's favorite pastime - watching television. With hardware such as ATI Technologies' Radeon All-In-Wonder video card, you'll also have more control over what you watch - and when you watch it - than with a regular television. As I write this, I'm flipping through dozens of cable channels with my PC mouse. The picture quality is good, and any time I want to, I can hit the "record" button on my screen to start "taping" the show on my hard disk.
BUSINESS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | October 19, 2000
Powered by strong sales in its tool divisions, Black & Decker Corp. announced record third-quarter earnings yesterday, beating analysts' expectations and delivering a long-awaited stock spike. Net earnings for the Towson-based toolmaker's third quarter that ended Oct. 1 were $86.3 million, compared with $75.3 million for the third quarter last year. Earnings per share increased 21 percent to $1.03 per share. Analysts estimated the company's profit at $1.01 per share. Black & Decker's stock, which has fallen since its high of $52.25 in December, closed at $30.63 yesterday, up $2.19.
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