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NEWS
By Tim Craig and Sun Staff | May 5, 2003
The annual campaign by interest groups to persuade Maryland's governor to sign -- or veto -- legislation sitting on his desk is taking an unusually emotional twist this spring. In a radio spot airing statewide, a father who lost his son Sept. 11, 2001, sternly urges Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. to reject a bill to study ways of making it easier for undocumented workers to obtain Maryland driver's licenses. "He was 23 when terrorists struck the World Trade Center," Peter Gadiel of Connecticut says in the ad. "I can't bring Jamie back.
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NEWS
November 1, 2009
A job fair will be held from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Wednesday at Fort Meade, with more than 80 potential employers recruiting. The Fort Meade Veterans Job Fair, run by military offices and the Maryland Department of Labor, Licensing and Regulation, is open to veterans and nonveterans. The program will take place at Club Meade, 6600 Mapes Road, and will include information sessions on federal resumes. Among the jobs are those in health care, public safety, administrative work, logistics and computers.
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NEWS
By Morris Chafetz | July 22, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Just how old is ''old enough'' in the United States? Sometimes it is hard to tell.Although 16-year-olds with little, if any, training are old enough to get behind the wheel of a car weighing more than a ton, they still are considered too young to make many important decisions that accrue to them automatically when they turn 18.The 26th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution endows Americans who reach age 18 with nearly all the privileges of...
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | October 1, 2009
Judges will have broader authority to take guns away from the subjects of domestic violence orders starting today, under a pair of laws that are among several new statutes officials hope will make the state safer. Dozens of laws approved by the General Assembly and signed by the governor earlier this year take effect today. The new laws also include sweeping environmental policy changes and an increase in weekly unemployment benefits to a maximum of $410 starting next week. Many of the public safety measures are aimed at drivers.
NEWS
By Ellen Barry and Ellen Barry,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 29, 2004
NASHVILLE, Tenn. -- When Jerry Tseng left the Driver License Station recently, he was the possessor of a new, and puzzling, form of identification. Tennessee's "certificate for driving," which identifies its holder as a non-U.S. citizen, resembles a driver's license in some ways. Printed on it is a photograph of Tseng, a Singaporean citizen studying at Vanderbilt University on a student visa. But the card is more remarkable for a function it does not perform: Below the state flag are the words "For driving purposes only -- not valid for identification."
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Evening Sun Staff | February 8, 1991
It's kids like the pretty, 16-year-old girl who used a forged driver's license to spend several nights a week drinking at a raucous Essex bar that get to Brian Young.Young is a state Motor Vehicle Administration investigator. The girl was one of 45 to 60 buyers of fake licenses who, by their presence in Baltimore County Circuit Court yesterday, helped persuade three college-age men to plead guilty to charges of conspiracy to make the forged documents, Young said.Christopher P. Raimondi, 18, of the 11900 block of Bluestone Road, Kingsville; James F. Ryley 3d, 20, of the 800 block of Pine Ridge Court, Bel Air; and Raymond P. Fisher, 20, of the 2100block of Sunnythorn Road, Essex, were each sentenced to 45 days in the county detention center and three years' probation.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,Sun Staff Writer | September 30, 1994
Brian James Everett chose the wrong obituary when he took a jailbird's advice and tried to get a driver's license by creating a new identity, his attorney said yesterday.The name he selected was that of John Kenneth Temple, 26, who was slain execution-style with his wife, Lori, 22, in December at their Parkville home. Baltimore County police still are seeking the killers.Yesterday in Towson District Court, Judge Darryl G. Fletcher found Mr. Everett guilty of a misdemeanor for impersonating another in attempting to register to vote.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | February 11, 1993
Like a stern parent who disciplines a child by withholding the car keys, Gov. William Donald Schaefer wants to keep minors from drinking by threatening to take away their driver's licenses.Schaefer administration officials yesterday asked a House committee to approve a bill that would automatically suspend the driver's license for at least 30 days of anyone under age 21 convicted of possessing or consuming an alcoholic beverage.That would be a departure from current state laws, which give judicial authorities the power to suspend a driver's license only for offenses directly related to driving or to the use of a driver's license.
NEWS
By Nick Anderson and Nick Anderson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 17, 2002
WASHINGTON - The Senate overwhelmingly approved legislation yesterday meant to improve the nation's election systems, clearing it for President Bush's signature despite concerns among some civil rights advocates that the measure could pose new obstacles to voting. The action, following a similar House vote last week, completes the congressional drive to respond to the 2000 presidential election controversy. Flaws in the machinery of American democracy were exposed in that election, as the Florida recount made punch-card ballots and chads infamous and left the contest between Bush and Democrat Al Gore in limbo for more than a month.
NEWS
By Mary Curtius and Mary Curtius,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 3, 2005
WASHINGTON - Congressional negotiators agreed yesterday to measures that would discourage states from issuing driver's licenses to illegal immigrants, tighten asylum requirements and complete the border fence between California and Mexico, sources involved in the talks said. The agreement by House and Senate negotiators made it all but certain that the measures, by attaching them to the emergency spending bill, would become law. The driver's license provision would, for the first time, set national standards for the state-issued documents.
NEWS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Don.markus@baltsun.com | July 29, 2009
A Howard County jury took an hour Tuesday to find a 38-year-old Carroll County man guilty of using a high school friend's identity to obtain a Florida driver's license so he could avoid prosecution for driving after his own Maryland license had been revoked. Gerald Titus Jr. of the 2200 block of Gillis Road in Woodbine will be sentenced by Judge Louis A. Becker III in October. Titus, who seemed on the verge of accepting a plea that would have carried an 18-month sentence in county jail, faces up to 3 1/2 years in a state facility.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | April 17, 2009
Applicants for a Maryland driver's license will have to demonstrate their skills on the road as well as on an off-road course, the head of the state Motor Vehicle Administration said Thursday. John T. Kuo, the MVA administrator, said an on-road pilot project in Frederick and Waldorf that began in December has been successful. Kuo said the new test, which splits the 15-minute driving test between on-road and off-road segments, has been especially well-received by parents. Driver's license applicants were less enthusiastic, he said, adding that the new test is tougher than the old. "It's really a better gauge of the young driver's ability to drive behind the wheel," Kuo said.
NEWS
April 1, 2009
If Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration chief John Kuo doesn't believe he has the power to keep a driver's license from Frederick Henry Hensen Jr. and other serial speeders, he hasn't read the law. The state's transportation article says quite plainly the MVA "may suspend, revoke, or refuse to issue or renew the license" of any driver "who has been convicted of moving violations so often as to indicate an intent to disregard the traffic laws and the...
NEWS
March 31, 2009
One way or another, Maryland is going to have to meet federal standards for driver's licenses under the Real ID program. The only question is whether the state legislature does so while extending some understanding to the state's immigrant community. From the start, Real ID has been a flawed tool in the federal effort to improve national security. By creating a de facto national ID card but shifting the burden of such a program to the states, Congress foolishly enlisted Motor Vehicle Administration clerks to the front lines of national defense.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | March 29, 2009
The head of Maryland's Motor Vehicle Administration calls Frederick Henry Hensen Jr. "a menace to highway safety." The prosecutor who put him in jail says he has no business having a driver's license. But nothing, it seems, can keep Hensen off the road. In 1999, Hensen, then 22, was convicted in Carroll County Circuit Court of manslaughter by automobile in the death of Geraldine "Geri" Lane Wu. A jury found that a road race on Route 140 involving Hensen and two other drivers led to the crash that killed the popular middle school teacher and seriously injured her daughter.
NEWS
March 28, 2009
GOP cancels support for driver's permit bill Republican lawmakers rescinded their support Friday of a proposal that would require Marylanders to show proof of U.S. residency when obtaining a new driver's license. They objected to a provision added late Thursday that would permit people already licensed to renew without documenting their legal status. Those licenses would be marked "not federally compliant" and would not be accepted at airports. Del. Ron George, an Anne Arundel County Republican who has sponsored "lawful presence" bills for years, said the amendment would create a confusing "two-tier" system.
NEWS
May 4, 2005
WHEN THE OPPOSITION is so broad as to include both Republican Sen. John E. Sununu of New Hampshire and the American Civil Liberties Union, the idea in question has to be just godawful. Well, Washington seldom proves a pessimist wrong. Some misguided members of Congress want to set strict federal standards on the issuance of driver's licenses. Not only would this reverse the much more rational process for upgrading driver's license security that Congress approved just six months ago, but it's heavy-handed to the point of absurdity.
NEWS
February 1, 2007
With a May 2008 start date looming, Congress' requirement that states use their driver's licensing authority to police illegal immigration and enforce a national identity program is sparking a nationwide rumble of resistance. Mainers went first, with the state legislature voting nearly unanimously last week to call for the federal Real ID law's repeal. Montana, Hawaii, Georgia, Massachusetts, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Vermont and Washington are not far behind. As many as 30 states, possibly including Maryland, are expected to join the cause.
NEWS
September 11, 2008
Proposals to raise the legal driving age to 17 or older have generally met with strong resistance in Maryland and elsewhere despite safety concerns. If inexperienced drivers are the problem, such a policy would simply delay the inevitable. The latest report from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety makes the case that age matters, however. And it has compelled the respected safety advocacy organization to call on states to raise the driving age to 17 or even 18 - as in many industrialized nations.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,Sun Reporter | June 19, 2008
No driver's license? No problem. Or so 55-year-old Richard Samuel Dorsey Jr. seems to think. The Annapolis-area man has been convicted six times of driving on a revoked or suspended license. He also has three DUIs, more than a dozen traffic convictions and 40 instances of failing to appear in court, police say. Yet there he was Tuesday evening, driving around the state capital in a cream-colored Cadillac until an officer pulled him over for speeding. "The guy cooperated - I guess he's used to it," said Officer Hal Dalton, a spokesman for the Annapolis Police Department.
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