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By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff writer | January 14, 1992
The Board of Education voted yesterday to charge for driver's education.For this semester, students will have to pay $20. Beginning in September, however, students will have to pay the full cost of the program -- between $100 and $200.In a 5-2-1 vote, the board accepted School Superintendent Larry L. Lorton's recommendation. The superintendent estimated the change would save about $1.2 million next year.Board member Vincent O. Leggett, who abstained from the vote, said he opposed dismantling programs without reviewing all non-required courses first.
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NEWS
December 29, 2003
MARYLAND DESERVES to have safe roads, but it also needs to put people in jobs. What happens when one of the country's toughest driver's education mandates collides with Baltimore's high unemployment rate? That's the question raised by a recent report from the Abell Foundation that suggests the city's disadvantaged are virtually barred from finding jobs in the suburbs because it's too difficult, and costly, to get a driver's license. Since 1999, Maryland has had a graduated driver's license, or GDL. It's a three-stage program that limits first-time drivers to a learner's period, and then to a provisional (or rookie driver)
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NEWS
By Signe Lauren | June 16, 1995
I CAN'T REMEMBER exactly when we started calling my father The Boss, but I'll never forget why. His authoritarian style left no question as to who was in charge at our house. He could make me feel like I was being cross-examined in court, especially if I espoused ideas that differed from his. I had to be well-prepared and have my facts straight. Even if I won a debate, I didn't care; I was just thankful it was over. As a result, today I am able to hold my own with anyone.Admittedly, The Boss made a lot of mistakes and was wrong about a lot of things.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | August 11, 2002
My fellow mothers and I are embarking on a new and highly lucrative enterprise. We are all quitting our day jobs to start a driver's education school. We think we have found the golden fleece -- and I do mean fleece -- and we have the state government to thank for it. The state requires all new drivers to pass a driver's education course that includes 30 hours of classroom time and six hours of driving time. But -- get this -- the state has so little oversight authority and so little staff to inspect these schools that we will be able to charge our captive market untold hundreds of dollars while providing their children just about anything in the way of driver's education.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1997
Ryan Buckholtz wants the Class of 1997 to stay clear of Glenelg High School's history of fatal traffic accidents.At least seven of the western Howard County high school's students have died in auto accidents since 1988, though none since December 1994. Several graduates have died in traffic accidents in recent years in the area.But when Ryan, a 17-year-old senior at the high school, turned to the Internet for advice on how to be a safe driver, he couldn't find anything -- a surprising discovery for a teen-ager of the 1990s accustomed to finding just about anything on the World Wide Web.So Ryan collected his own set of tips and created an Internet home page that has attracted interest not just from new drivers in Howard County but from around the country and the world.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff writer | January 12, 1992
There will be no more free ride for driver's education in the county, if the Board of Education agrees tomorrow with a recommendation by School Superintendent Larry L. Lorton.In a cost-saving move, Lorton has recommended that the driver's education program be sliced, saving the county about $1.2 million next year.Driver's education is now offered free to about 3,200 students annually. Under the superintendent's proposal, it would be offered after school for a fee "as a service to students," said Dr. Cheryl H. Wilhoyte, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction and School Administration.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | December 23, 2000
THE OTHER NIGHT as I rolled past a stop sign in a neighborhood intersection, I was rebuked by my passengers. "That was not a complete stop," one passenger said. "That's right," said his companion. "When you come to a complete stop, the car rocks." At the next stop sign I planted my foot on the brake pedal and the car rocked like the seat swinging atop a Ferris wheel. Much better, my critics assured me. That is how life on the road goes these days any time I am chauffeuring our soon-to-be 16-year-old son, and his soon-to-be 16-year-old buddy.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | February 9, 1993
Instead of trying to squeeze driver education into their class schedules, students who want to take the course may have to fit it between extracurricular activities and after-school jobs.The Board of Education will hear a proposal from its staff tomorrow to eliminate driving classes from the school day starting in the 1994-1995 school year, mainly because of increasing costs.Driver education already has been eliminated in Frederick, Anne Arundel, Harford, Howard, Montgomery, Prince George's and Baltimore counties, according to a report from Carroll's school administrators.
NEWS
By Dianne Williams Hayes and Dianne Williams Hayes,Staff writer | April 4, 1991
Even in the face of a tightening school budget, Board of Education members are reluctant to end the county's 39-year history of preparingyoung drivers to take to the road.During a day-long school boardmeeting yesterday, only board members Jo Ann Tollenger and Thomas Twombly supported dismissing the free half-credit course which providesclassroom instruction, simulation and driving lessons at an annual cost of $900,000."We can't be all things to all people," Tollenger said. "The question is where in the budget we put our resources.
NEWS
June 14, 1992
Don't use public moneyFrom: Ivan S. ShermanWestminsterThis letter is in response to Sharon Hornberger's column in the June 7 edition.The bottom line of Ms. Hornberger's comments was that driver's education in our high schools should continue to be financed by public funds.In defending this conclusion, she said . . . "the main thrust of our education was to prepare us for the 'real world'."I strongly disagree, philosophically, with that statement.The concept that public education is to assure our graduates that they can get along in the real world has come into the foreground of policy-makers in the past 25 years.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | December 23, 2000
THE OTHER NIGHT as I rolled past a stop sign in a neighborhood intersection, I was rebuked by my passengers. "That was not a complete stop," one passenger said. "That's right," said his companion. "When you come to a complete stop, the car rocks." At the next stop sign I planted my foot on the brake pedal and the car rocked like the seat swinging atop a Ferris wheel. Much better, my critics assured me. That is how life on the road goes these days any time I am chauffeuring our soon-to-be 16-year-old son, and his soon-to-be 16-year-old buddy.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | March 8, 1998
MATTHEW IS the smartest kid I have ever met, and I would think that about him even if he were not the first-born of my husband's best friend.He will graduate from college this spring with plenty of A's, and he is going to graduate school to study how the brain functions. My hope is that he works really fast so he can tell me how to get the two young brains I am in charge of to function.Anyway, I remember when Matthew learned to drive. Within hours of obtaining his license, Matt grazed a brick wall with his car.Matt was alone, undistracted by a carload of friends.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 11, 1997
Ryan Buckholtz wants the Class of 1997 to stay clear of Glenelg High School's history of fatal traffic accidents.At least seven of the western Howard County high school's students have died in auto accidents since 1988, though none since December 1994. Several graduates have died in traffic accidents in recent years in the area.But when Ryan, a 17-year-old senior at the high school, turned to the Internet for advice on how to be a safe driver, he couldn't find anything -- a surprising discovery for a teen-ager of the 1990s accustomed to finding just about anything on the World Wide Web.So Ryan collected his own set of tips and created an Internet home page that has attracted interest not just from new drivers in Howard County but from around the country and the world.
NEWS
By Signe Lauren | June 16, 1995
I CAN'T REMEMBER exactly when we started calling my father The Boss, but I'll never forget why. His authoritarian style left no question as to who was in charge at our house. He could make me feel like I was being cross-examined in court, especially if I espoused ideas that differed from his. I had to be well-prepared and have my facts straight. Even if I won a debate, I didn't care; I was just thankful it was over. As a result, today I am able to hold my own with anyone.Admittedly, The Boss made a lot of mistakes and was wrong about a lot of things.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | February 9, 1993
Instead of trying to squeeze driver education into their class schedules, students who want to take the course may have to fit it between extracurricular activities and after-school jobs.The Board of Education will hear a proposal from its staff tomorrow to eliminate driving classes from the school day starting in the 1994-1995 school year, mainly because of increasing costs.Driver education already has been eliminated in Frederick, Anne Arundel, Harford, Howard, Montgomery, Prince George's and Baltimore counties, according to a report from Carroll's school administrators.
NEWS
June 14, 1992
Don't use public moneyFrom: Ivan S. ShermanWestminsterThis letter is in response to Sharon Hornberger's column in the June 7 edition.The bottom line of Ms. Hornberger's comments was that driver's education in our high schools should continue to be financed by public funds.In defending this conclusion, she said . . . "the main thrust of our education was to prepare us for the 'real world'."I strongly disagree, philosophically, with that statement.The concept that public education is to assure our graduates that they can get along in the real world has come into the foreground of policy-makers in the past 25 years.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | March 8, 1998
MATTHEW IS the smartest kid I have ever met, and I would think that about him even if he were not the first-born of my husband's best friend.He will graduate from college this spring with plenty of A's, and he is going to graduate school to study how the brain functions. My hope is that he works really fast so he can tell me how to get the two young brains I am in charge of to function.Anyway, I remember when Matthew learned to drive. Within hours of obtaining his license, Matt grazed a brick wall with his car.Matt was alone, undistracted by a carload of friends.
NEWS
December 29, 2003
MARYLAND DESERVES to have safe roads, but it also needs to put people in jobs. What happens when one of the country's toughest driver's education mandates collides with Baltimore's high unemployment rate? That's the question raised by a recent report from the Abell Foundation that suggests the city's disadvantaged are virtually barred from finding jobs in the suburbs because it's too difficult, and costly, to get a driver's license. Since 1999, Maryland has had a graduated driver's license, or GDL. It's a three-stage program that limits first-time drivers to a learner's period, and then to a provisional (or rookie driver)
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff writer | January 14, 1992
The Board of Education voted yesterday to charge for driver's education.For this semester, students will have to pay $20. Beginning in September, however, students will have to pay the full cost of the program -- between $100 and $200.In a 5-2-1 vote, the board accepted School Superintendent Larry L. Lorton's recommendation. The superintendent estimated the change would save about $1.2 million next year.Board member Vincent O. Leggett, who abstained from the vote, said he opposed dismantling programs without reviewing all non-required courses first.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff writer | January 12, 1992
There will be no more free ride for driver's education in the county, if the Board of Education agrees tomorrow with a recommendation by School Superintendent Larry L. Lorton.In a cost-saving move, Lorton has recommended that the driver's education program be sliced, saving the county about $1.2 million next year.Driver's education is now offered free to about 3,200 students annually. Under the superintendent's proposal, it would be offered after school for a fee "as a service to students," said Dr. Cheryl H. Wilhoyte, Assistant Superintendent for Instruction and School Administration.
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