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NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Staff Writer | April 18, 1993
Beginning in fall 1994, Carroll teen-agers will have to tap their savings or their parents' wallets to pay for driver education.The county school board, on a 4-1 vote Wednesday, eliminated driver education from the curriculum. Driver education will be offered for the last time during the 1993-94 school year. Students pay $65 to cover on-the-road instruction costs.Board member Joseph D. Mish Jr. dissented. He said he preferred that the board adopt some compromise, such as after-school instruction at rates lower than what private companies charge.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 7, 2012
Distracted driving such as texting can results in thousands of lost lives each year. To prove that point the Shock Trauma Center for Injury Prevention and Policy at the University of Maryland in partnership with the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration has released this  dramatic video to show how someone's life can change in seconds. The “GET THE MESSAGE” video will now be included as part of the Maryland driver education curriculum. About 152,000 people were injured in distracted driving crashes in Maryland from 2007 to 2011 and 1,100 died.
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NEWS
February 18, 1993
Next year may be the last time that driver education is taught during the school day in Carroll County. Faced with the cost of replacing antiquated driving simulators, scheduling problems and the pressure to reduce costs, school administrators have proposed dropping the program, which serves about 1,500 students annually. Carroll would join neighboring counties that have already eliminated driver education for their high schoolers due to budget cuts.The school board, however, should make an extraordinary effort to ensure this course is available to students outside the school day.The school system's primary task is to provide instruction to students.
NEWS
Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2011
More than a half million dollars has been committed to law enforcement agencies across the state to improve school bus safety, the Governor's Office of Crime Control and Prevention announced Monday. Though the commitment comes months after a one-day study the State Department of Education discovered more than 7,000 violations by drivers regarding school bus safety, the two are not related, a state spokesman said. "There's no direct cause and effect," said Bill Toohey, a spokesman for the Office of Crime Control and Prevention.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | February 9, 1993
Instead of trying to squeeze driver education into their class schedules, students who want to take the course may have to fit it between extracurricular activities and after-school jobs.The Board of Education will hear a proposal from its staff tomorrow to eliminate driving classes from the school day starting in the 1994-1995 school year, mainly because of increasing costs.Driver education already has been eliminated in Frederick, Anne Arundel, Harford, Howard, Montgomery, Prince George's and Baltimore counties, according to a report from Carroll's school administrators.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | March 9, 1993
Little opposition is expected to a school board vote tomorrow that would end driver education by the summer of 1994, according to a school spokeswoman.At the behest of high school principals, the board will vote on dropping driver education as part of the school day, taught by school employees.The Board of Education is scheduled to meet at 9 a.m. tomorrow at its headquarters in the Courthouse Annex, 55 N. Court St., Westminster.The administration proposes letting a private firm offer driving courses after school hours and in the summer, in school buildings.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | February 15, 1993
When school was called off for snow Friday, teacher Edna McNemar got to work.She spent the morning telephoning her bosses. She saw the unexpected time off as an opportunity to start her campaign entreating school officials not to drop driver education.Like other driver education teachers, Mrs. McNemar is certified in another subject and won't lose her paycheck if the school board decides next month to stop teaching students how to drive.A seemingly tireless advocate, she says driver education is a skill that the schools should teach.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1998
Because most Maryland high schools have dropped driver education from their course offerings, parents and local driving schools are showing teen-agers how to parallel-park and complete three-point turns -- and it's driving everyone up a wall.Youths wish they could learn during schooltime, when it's convenient, free and taught by someone other than their jittery parents -- many of whom aren't loving the experience either.But budgets and time constraints have left no choice."The school day has become so crowded that school systems are really pressed to the gills with the basics, all the graduation requirements, the testing programs," said Owen Crabb, senior staff specialist in the Division of Instruction with the State Department of Education.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | March 11, 1993
Reluctant to drop driver education without an idea of what recourse students will have, the Carroll County school board voted yesterday to table a decision until May.Board members Ann M. Ballard and Joseph D. Mish said they were concerned about students who would not be able to afford to pay the more than $200 that private firms generally charge to teach someone to drive.School officials propose letting a private firm offer driving courses after school hours and in the summer. The private firms could use school space for classrooms.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff writer | March 10, 1991
A March 1 auto accident opposite Centennial High School that took the life of 16-year-old Andrea Barlow has sparked a move by the county PTA Council to restore driver education in the schools.County police reported that the accident occurred when Andrea, driving a Honda Accord, pulled out of Waterford Drive into the path of a northbound pickup truck on Centennial Lane. Her two friends, passengers in her car, were injured. It was at least the 10th traffic accident at the school during this school year.
NEWS
June 3, 2011
In honor of the 15th anniversary of its driver education program this month, Harford Community College will offer free tuition to the 5,000th student to enroll in the program, based on student records since 1998. The college said in a press release it expects the 5,000th student to enroll during the fall semester this year. The lucky student will receive free tuition for the class, a $319 value, according to the press release. HCC's driver education course began June 24, 1996, with four classes offered over the summer session.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
Driving is one of the most important things most of us do in our professional and personal lives, so why would we expect to learn it while we're in high school and then just stop? Doctors, nurses and other medical caregivers are expected to continue education over the course of their careers. In some fields, such as tax accounting, professionals have to update their knowledge every year or be left hopelessly behind. Even reporters can't help but pick up a few scraps of new information as we go about our work, even though we usually get to weasel out of tests.
NEWS
By JORGE VALENCIA | July 16, 2006
Howard County police issued 17 tickets in a 70-minute period last week in what a spokesman called an "education through enforcement" operation aimed at drivers who fail to stop for pedestrians. The Thursday afternoon operation took place at a designated crosswalk on Oakland Mills Road near Sewells Orchard. The "pedestrians" were police officers, said Pfc. Brandon Justice. The fine for the violation is $70 and 1 point on the driver's license.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | July 13, 2006
Year in, year out, the story is about the same: Somewhere between 600 and 670 people die in Maryland traffic crashes. They die in work zones. They die at intersections. They die because motorists are drunk, drowsy, distracted, aggressive, inadequately trained or going too fast. And all are part of a toll that many have come to regard as an inevitability. About 300 people from the private sector and from state, local and federal agencies gathered in Linthicum Heights yesterday to develop a plan to bring down that seemingly intractable number.
NEWS
December 4, 2005
Local public schools recently collected about 60 boxes, or about 1,487 pounds, of school supplies to send to Baton Rouge, La., for students left homeless by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. PTSA volunteers coordinated collection drives at Hollifield Station and Waverly elementary schools, Patapsco Middle School and Mount Hebron High School. Age-appropriate books, markers, calculators, crayons, scissors, pens and pencils, glue bottles and glue sticks, notebook paper and personal items such as toothbrushes and toothpaste were collected.
BUSINESS
By Rick Popely | March 7, 2004
Zero-percent financing and megabucks rebates pushed auto leasing into the background the past few years, but intriguing lease offers are popping up again. "There are some pretty good deals out there now," said Art Spinella, president of CNW Marketing Research in Bandon, Ore., which tracks industry trends. "A lot of the deals have minimal or zero down payment." Leasing was the rage in the late 1990s, when automakers promoted deals that sounded too good to be true, such as $299 per month for a $30,000 car with only $500 down.
NEWS
June 3, 2011
In honor of the 15th anniversary of its driver education program this month, Harford Community College will offer free tuition to the 5,000th student to enroll in the program, based on student records since 1998. The college said in a press release it expects the 5,000th student to enroll during the fall semester this year. The lucky student will receive free tuition for the class, a $319 value, according to the press release. HCC's driver education course began June 24, 1996, with four classes offered over the summer session.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | September 7, 2012
Distracted driving such as texting can results in thousands of lost lives each year. To prove that point the Shock Trauma Center for Injury Prevention and Policy at the University of Maryland in partnership with the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration has released this  dramatic video to show how someone's life can change in seconds. The “GET THE MESSAGE” video will now be included as part of the Maryland driver education curriculum. About 152,000 people were injured in distracted driving crashes in Maryland from 2007 to 2011 and 1,100 died.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | January 25, 2000
Some fledgling motorists in Maryland soon will take their driving tests on actual roads, instead of on the traffic-free courses now used by the Motor Vehicle Administration. The agency will begin a study Feb. 1 of the more realistic in-traffic exams, randomly selecting about 500 license applicants from its Annapolis office to take the tests. The General Assembly called for the study last year in response to pressure from driver education advocates. Maryland is among only a handful of states that tests drivers in artificial conditions rather than in real traffic.
NEWS
By Matthew L. Wald and Matthew L. Wald,New York Times News Service | May 30, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Beginning July 1, anyone applying for a license for the first time in Maryland will have to complete at least 30 hours of drivers' education in the classroom and 6 hours on the road. Maryland's drivers' ed requirement currently applies only to 16- and 17-year-olds as do the rules in most states that have requirements.The new Maryland law is also bucking a national trend against drivers' ed. The number of high schools offering on-the-road training has fallen by about half since 1975, experts say. The new law will not restore those programs, but will send more young people to commercial training schools.
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