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NEWS
December 31, 1992
Residents of Carroll and Howard counties have decided something must be done about the young lives being lost in car accidents and have started a petition campaign to raise the state's minimum driving age from 16 to 17.It's not hard to see why the petitioners are concerned. They only have to point out what an awful year this has been for Glenelg High School in neighboring Howard County. From last February through November, three Glenelg students and a recent graduate of the school died in car accidents.
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NEWS
June 11, 2009
Another example of Baltimore corruption Tuesday night the city school board hired its departing chairman for a newly created, high ranking position that will make him one of the highest paid employees of the system, based on the recommendation of the schools chief whom he helped hire. The job was not announced and did not exist previously, and the departing chairman is a real estate developer with no degree or previous experience in education. This does not pass the sniff test. The Baltimore Sun has this story right next to one in which the Sunpaper reports a bunch of people in city government and county government are taking cars home.
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NEWS
March 5, 1992
A Deale man convicted of auto manslaughter two years ago was orderedto a residential substance-abuse program yesterday for violating theterms of his probation by driving while drunk, a prosecutor said.William Anthony Brown, 21, was ordered to attend a program known as Teen Challenge, near Princeton, W.Va., said Patrick J. Bell, an assistant state's attorney.Brown, of the 5800 block of Rockhold Creek Road, was convicted ofauto manslaughter and driving under the influence of alcohol in the July 1989 death of Marian Barbara Nutwell, Bell said.
NEWS
By Robert Sullivan | July 3, 2007
The summer driving trip - the "pack the kids in the car and set out for the West or the East or possibly the Grand Canyon" trip - is once again in jeopardy. Of course, it's been endangered before, especially during the energy crises in 1973 and 1979, when people spent good portions of their vacations lined up at the gas station. But this time, the death of the car-bound family vacation feels real to me. (It feels real to some tourist destinations, such as Aspen, Colo., where tourism officials are offering free parking, free bicycle rentals and a voucher for $50 worth of free gas.)
NEWS
By ANDREI CODRESCU | January 6, 1992
New Orleans. -- My driving teacher is Mr. Carney.Yes, I've gone ahead and done it. After 25 years as that rarissima of advises in America -- the pedestrian -- I am going to be a driver. I'll drive a car and I'll have an ID to cash checks with.Mr. Carney says, ''Being a good driver is like being a good Christian, you have to practice every day.''OK, I'll be a good driver. I will signal before I turn. I will look before I pass. I will stop before the sign. But I've got problems. Mr. Carney says, ''Turn right,'' and I turn left.
NEWS
June 11, 2009
Another example of Baltimore corruption Tuesday night the city school board hired its departing chairman for a newly created, high ranking position that will make him one of the highest paid employees of the system, based on the recommendation of the schools chief whom he helped hire. The job was not announced and did not exist previously, and the departing chairman is a real estate developer with no degree or previous experience in education. This does not pass the sniff test. The Baltimore Sun has this story right next to one in which the Sunpaper reports a bunch of people in city government and county government are taking cars home.
NEWS
December 31, 1992
Last March, students at Edgewood High School in Harford County mourned the deaths of two members of the school's "It's Academic" team. The two boys, ages 17 and 15, died in a car crash. Less than a month earlier, Edgewood students had mourned two other classmates -- who also were killed in an automobile accident.This sad tale has an eerie counterpart at Howard County's Glenelg High School. From last February through November, three students and a recent graduate of the school died in car accidents.
NEWS
December 31, 1992
It's been a bad year for the students and staff of Glenelg High School. From last February through November, three students and a recent graduate of the school died in car accidents. The site of one accident was the same place where a Glenelg cheerleader perished in a wreck three years earlier.Frightened and distraught by all the carnage, residents of Howard and neighboring Carroll counties have begun a petition drive to raise the state's minimum driving age from 16 to 17. David Myers of Woodbine, the campaign's organizer and the father of a Glenelg student, says another year on the minimum driving age would "add that much more maturity and experience to the driver."
NEWS
December 31, 1992
This past March, two boys, ages 17 and 15, died in a ca crash, and students at Edgewood High School in Harford County found themselves mourning the deaths of two members of the school's "It's Academic" team. Less than a month earlier, Edgewood students had mourned two other classmates, also killed in an automobile accident.This sad tale has an eerie counterpart at Howard County's Glenelg High School. From last February through November, three students and a recent graduate of the school died in car accidents.
NEWS
December 31, 1992
Five 17-year-olds were driving on Outing Avenue in Pasadena last month when a passenger in the back seat reached in and grabbed the steering wheel, apparently as a joke. The driver lost control and slammed the car into a tree, killing one girl and critically injuring another.This tragic tale echoes others from around Maryland this year. Howard County's Glenelg High School was hit especially hard in 1992, when three students and a recent graduate died in car wrecks.Angered by all the carnage, residents of Howard and Carroll counties have spearheaded a petition campaign to raise the state's minimum driving age from 16 to 17. The campaign's organizer contends that adding a year to the minimum age will add that much more maturity to young drivers.
NEWS
By LAURA VOZZELLA | December 27, 2006
As he gets ready for life as an ex-governor, Bob Ehrlich might be wondering what the hardest adjustment will be. William Donald Schaefer asked one of his predecessors that very question, as his own days as governor were growing short. Marvin Mandel didn't have to think about it: "Learning how to drive again." This from a governor whose transition - from Government House to Big House - was more precipitous and painful than most. "It's not that you don't know how to drive a car. It's that you don't know how to get to where you're going," Mandel told me the other day. "When you don't drive, you're sitting in the back seat.
BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 20, 2006
Jon Aumann Computer support technician Geek Squad, Baltimore Salary --$35,000 a year Age --20 Years on the job --Two How he got started --Aumann began working at Best Buy, which owns the Geek Squad, two years ago. He worked on in-house repairs and upgrades at Best Buy's Security Boulevard store. Currently he is a Geek Squad "double agent," meaning he can work in the store or go on house calls. Aumann also is in his junior year at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, where he is completing a computer engineering degree.
TRAVEL
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 5, 2006
Are there resources that could help me buy and drive a car in Argentina? According to the State Department's Consular Information Sheet, found online at travel.state.gov/travel, U.S. driver's licenses are valid in the city and province of Buenos Aires, but Argentine or international licenses are required elsewhere. In the United States, AAA is authorized to handle international driver's licenses, and an application can be found at aaa.com. As far as buying and selling a car, Luciana Bieler, the spokeswoman for the National Secretary of Tourism, wrote in an e-mail that foreigners must present to car dealers a passport, proof of address and credit card to buy a vehicle.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | March 23, 2001
THE NEXT TIME someone asks what one person can do for the bay, tell him or her to buy the Green Book, the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy's guide to environmentally sound cars and trucks. Just as the Kelley Blue Book is the definitive guide to auto prices, the ACEEE's Green Book, updated annually, gives a comprehensive environmental impact statement for every passenger vehicle sold in America. It's far more than just a fuel economy guide. It assigns each vehicle an overall green rating based on human health damage from tailpipe pollution.
NEWS
By Michael T. Bornemann | July 18, 2000
ON ECHODALE Avenue at Harford Road, I have caught the No. 44 bus at 5:40 a.m. every workday since I totaled my car in March. Most of the Baltimore metropolitan area sleeps as a handful of passengers and I travel to work on the verge of daybreak. I transfer to the northbound No. 8 bus at 6:05 a.m. on York Road at Northern Parkway. The "coach" -- as in, "REMAIN BEHIND THE STANDEE LINE WHEN THE COACH IS IN MOTION," is full of folks who can't or won't drive a car. The landscaping crew from BARC (the Baltimore Association for Retarded Citizens)
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | May 7, 1999
IT IS ONE OF THE MORE ironic signs of our times -- a four-wheel drive, a pickup or a minivan sporting a bumper sticker that says "Save The Bay" or a license plate proclaiming "Treasure the Chesapeake."It's a common enough sight, as all have gotten very popular.The pickups, vans and "sport utility vehicles" like Jeeps, Suburbans and Explorers have burgeoned from 20 million in the 1970s to 65 million nationwide. They account for half of all passenger vehicles sold each year.Membership in environmental groups such as the Chesapeake Bay Foundation (slogan, Save The Bay)
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1999
David C. Jones Jr. didn't say anything when the car salesman directed him to take the 1993 Lexus to a pair of open-air drug markets in Park Heights.He remained silent when the salesman got out of the car at each location and came back a few minutes later.But when Jones returned to the car dealership on Reisterstown Road after his test drive yesterday afternoon, he revealed his occupation: police officer in Baltimore's Central District drug unit."I couldn't believe that he would take me on a test drive through open air drug markets," said Jones, a 15-year veteran.
FEATURES
By Elise T. Chisolm | August 10, 1993
What's with these kids of mine? I taught them everything they know. I taught them how to walk, how to eat, how to read, ride a bike, swim and -- the hardest lesson of all -- how to drive a car, which took infinite patience and courage.In vacant parking lots I would put my life in their hands and embrace the --board while my toes were curling. And would you believe that these whiz kids, these audacious baby boomers, now grown, won't let me drive their cars? They say it is because their cars are foreign: "Mom, you've never driven a foreign car," blah, blah, blah.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1999
David C. Jones Jr. didn't say anything when the car salesman directed him to take the 1993 Lexus to a pair of open-air drug markets in Park Heights.He remained silent when the salesman got out of the car at each location and came back a few minutes later.But when Jones returned to the car dealership on Reisterstown Road after his test drive yesterday afternoon, he revealed his occupation: police officer in Baltimore's Central District drug unit."I couldn't believe that he would take me on a test drive through open air drug markets," said Jones, a 15-year veteran.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | July 20, 1997
The next time the teens and preteens start whining on the second day of vacation, throw them in the car and head for the hills.The nearest ones will do -- as long as there's a mountain-bike rental shop in the area and an off-the-road bike trail, preferably one with plenty of twists and bumps along the way."All of us remember the freedom and joy of riding a two-wheeler. It's even more fun when you're not sharing the road with cars and not so worried about the kids and traffic," says Tim Blumenthal, an ardent family mountain biker and executive director of the fast-growing International Mountain Bicycling Association.
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