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By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | August 1, 2002
Traces of a hazardous chemical have turned up in three wells that provide drinking water to the city of Aberdeen, test results released yesterday by Aberdeen Proving Ground show. In June, perchlorate was detected in one of 11 city wells around the base's perimeter. The chemical did not reappear in that well when water was tested July 23, but it was detected in three others, said Pat McClung, APG spokeswoman. City Manager Peter A. Dacey said "there's no need for alarm," because the perchlorate appeared at low levels - between 1.2 and 1.7 parts per billion.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 8, 2014
Last weekend the drinking water of 400,000 Toledo, Ohio, residents was fouled by animal waste ( "Lake Erie not alone in suffering from harmful algae," Aug. 6). With the unfettered growth of animal agriculture and ineffective discharge regulations, it could happen again in our state. The problem has become pervasive. Waste from chicken farms has rendered the ocean off the East Coast unfit for fishing. Waste from Midwest cattle ranches carried downstream by Mississippi River has created a permanent dead zone in the Gulf of Mexico larger than that of the 2010 BP oil spill.
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NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2001
Robert Atkins thought he was really onto something, collecting his drinking water for free from a spring on Henryton Road in southeastern Carroll County. Clear and delicious, it reminded him of the water he drank growing up on a Virginia farm. After a few weeks, however, Atkins came down with gas pains and diarrhea. Suspicious, he had the spring water tested and, sure enough, it had a high bacteria count. He complained to a string of state and county agencies. Despite Atkins' complaints and additional testing by The Sun that also showed unhealthy levels of bacteria, Carroll health officials and Maryland environmental officials say they're not responsible for monitoring water quality at springs or warning people not to drink from them.
NEWS
July 12, 2014
I am writing in response to Chris Wood's commentary about pollution in the Chesapeake Bay ("Trout, the bay - and your drinking water - at risk in the Senate," June 18). As a girl raised for more than 13 years in Maryland, I grew up boating, crabbing and swimming in the bay and the Severn River, and I am deeply saddened to see how the bay's health has declined since then. The Chesapeake Bay produces 500 million pounds of seafood a year. I have experienced this firsthand when I caught blue crabs for our family dinner many nights.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2014
Environmental activists warn that construction of a 21-mile natural gas pipeline through northern Baltimore and Harford counties could affect the region's drinking-water system, as the $180 million project cuts across more than three dozen streams feeding into Loch Raven Reservoir. Theaux Le Gardeur, executive director of the Gunpowder Riverkeeper, has petitioned the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to reconsider its approval of the pipeline last month and order a more detailed review of the project's environmental effects.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | November 15, 2013
The Harford County Department of Public Works' Water and Sewer Division will temporarily switch water sources at the Abingdon Water Treatment Plant from the usual supply originating at Loch Raven Reservoir to the Susquehanna River behind Conowingo Dam. The switch will occur during the evening of Monday, Nov. 18. DPW will start treating the Susquehanna water through the treatment plant on the morning of Tuesday, Nov. 19. Once the switch has...
NEWS
October 13, 1993
The answer to the above question is: yes, by and large. But a new report by the Natural Resources Defense Council, a private environmental watchdog organization in Washington, warns that public water systems nationwide contain enough contaminants to cause more than 900,000 illnesses annually. More alarming, 900 people may die from waterborne diseases each year, the NRDC says.Concerns about public water two decades ago led Congress to pass the Safe Drinking Water Act of 1974. The legislation called for the nation's 200,000 local water systems to be regulated by the federal and state governments.
NEWS
By Chris Wood | June 18, 2014
On Monday, the Chesapeake Executive Council signed the Chesapeake Watershed Agreement, a collaborative effort across multiple states to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay. But the celebration of the watershed agreement may be premature. Down the road in Congress there is an effort under way to strip the protections of the Clean Water Act from small headwater streams that feed the bay with cold, clean water. The federal government recently proposed a rule to clarify a politically charged Supreme Court ruling which undermined 30 years of protection of the Clean Water Act for small headwater streams.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1995
Residents of the Baltimore metropolitan area like the taste of their drinking water, but most fear that the quality of that water is in jeopardy, according to a poll conducted for the Reservoir Watershed Protection Program.Local residents had considerably more confidence in their drinking water than did Americans nationwide.In the local survey, conducted in May and June and released last week, 79 percent of 861 residents who live in the watersheds of the area's three reservoirs -- Liberty, Prettyboy and Loch Raven, all operated by Baltimore -- rated their drinking water excellent to good.
NEWS
By John Rivera | November 18, 1991
The lower Susquehanna River has been as much as 13 times saltier than normal, prompting a health alert urging some residents of the Havre de Grace area whose drinking water comes from the river to use bottled water instead.The low water level in the normally freshwater Susquehanna, resulting from drought conditions, is causing salt water from the Chesapeake Bay to back up into the river.That, Havre de Grace officials say, is leading to unusually high levels of salt in the drinking water of the old riverfront town and surrounding communities.
NEWS
June 22, 2014
This spring, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency took some long-overdue steps to fix the Clean Water Act, ending confusion over which streams and wetlands are protected by the law. Loopholes in the law created over the past decade have left more the half the stream miles in the U.S. and drinking water sources for 100 percent of Baltimore City residents at risk from pollution and development. Polluters and their allies in Congress are fighting tooth and nail to block the EPA from taking this common sense step to protect clean water.
NEWS
By Chris Wood | June 18, 2014
On Monday, the Chesapeake Executive Council signed the Chesapeake Watershed Agreement, a collaborative effort across multiple states to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay. But the celebration of the watershed agreement may be premature. Down the road in Congress there is an effort under way to strip the protections of the Clean Water Act from small headwater streams that feed the bay with cold, clean water. The federal government recently proposed a rule to clarify a politically charged Supreme Court ruling which undermined 30 years of protection of the Clean Water Act for small headwater streams.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | January 22, 2014
The recent massive spill of the toxic chemical MCHM into West Virginia's Elk River illustrates another benefit to corporate interests of high unemployment, economic insecurity and a safety-net shot through with holes. Not only are employees eager to accept whatever job they can get, but they are also unwilling to demand healthy and safe environments. The spill was the region's third major chemical accident in five years, coming after two investigations by the federal Chemical Safety Board in the Kanawha Valley, also known as "Chemical Valley," and repeated recommendations from federal regulators and environmental advocates that the state embrace tougher rules to better safeguard chemicals.
NEWS
January 7, 2014
Thank you for Tim Wheeler 's article on opposition to the construction of a new natural gas pipeline because of the effects it may have on local water supplies ("Pipeline may affect drinking water, activists fear," Jan. 1). There are other reasons to oppose the building of this pipeline. Natural gas is popular because it is inexpensive and promoted as burning cleaner than coal. However, when one factors in the greenhouse gas effects of methane leaks during drilling and transportation, it may not be cleaner than coal.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | January 1, 2014
Environmental activists warn that construction of a 21-mile natural gas pipeline through northern Baltimore and Harford counties could affect the region's drinking-water system, as the $180 million project cuts across more than three dozen streams feeding into Loch Raven Reservoir. Theaux Le Gardeur, executive director of the Gunpowder Riverkeeper, has petitioned the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to reconsider its approval of the pipeline last month and order a more detailed review of the project's environmental effects.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | November 15, 2013
The Harford County Department of Public Works' Water and Sewer Division will temporarily switch water sources at the Abingdon Water Treatment Plant from the usual supply originating at Loch Raven Reservoir to the Susquehanna River behind Conowingo Dam. The switch will occur during the evening of Monday, Nov. 18. DPW will start treating the Susquehanna water through the treatment plant on the morning of Tuesday, Nov. 19. Once the switch has...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service Sun staff writer Timothy B. Wheeler contributed to this article | May 20, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Eight years after it voted to drastically tighten the purity standards for tap water, the Senate decided yesterday that it had overreached and voted 95-3 to loosen them again.Whether the Senate's changes, made to the Safe Drinking Water Act, would actually increase the existing, tiny risks of drinking tap water was in some dispute.Environmental groups called the vote a victory for the pesticide lobby and for financially strapped water companies.The senators, in turn, argued that the current law was so draconian that no one had been able to meet all its dictates anyway, including the Environmental Protection Agency, which has the responsibility to enforce the law."
NEWS
By TIMOTHY B. WHEELER | October 3, 1993
Many Americans thought tap water could make them ill only if they traveled to some Third World countries.Then in April, thousands of Milwaukee-area residents came down with diarrhea, abdominal pains and vomiting. At first it was thought to be a flu outbreak. Laboratory tests eventually detected a waterborne parasite in the city's water supply, which comes from Lake Michigan.By the time Milwaukee's water was declared safe again, an estimated 370,000 people had been made sick by drinking water contaminated with the parasite, cryptosporidium.
NEWS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
An Edgewood auto shop pleaded guilty to falsifying an inspection report two years ago on an underground gasoline storage tank, Maryland's attorney general announced Thursday. John R. Pasquinelli Enterprises Inc., which does business as J.C. Discount Tires, was fined $10,000 by a Harford County District Court judge, with half of that suspended. The company was also put on a one-year probation. The Maryland Department of the Environment uncovered discrepancies in inspection reports.
NEWS
July 18, 2013
I remember vividly the Baltimore police officer who strode into my tent at Artscape, glanced at my art, and in very explicit terms told me how angry he was. My wife looked at me, wondering whether I was about to be arrested. "So why is this about the only fine art in the whole place?" He asked. "This is Artscape - so where's all the art?" Having slowly roasted in a large tent by the Lyric for three Artscapes while displaying pastels and oil paintings of wild storms, I can tell you exactly why - having Artscape in July is insane.
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