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By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and JoAnna Daemmrich and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 28, 1996
FORT JACKSON, S.C. -- They joined the Army to defend their country, but quickly found they had to protect themselves first.During their initial weeks in uniform last spring, the 104 female recruits of Alpha Company of the 1st Battalion of the 61st Infantry came face to face with rogue drill sergeants.Marching through the mud in the pre-dawn darkness, they had to chant along as drill instructors called out obscene and vulgar cadences, several recall. Among the tamer lyrics: "Two by two, we did it to you -- in the day room" and "Four by four, she was begging for more -- in the day room."
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By Kevin Cowherd | January 3, 2011
After all the hype about wanting to get it right, Maryland turned to Randy Edsall Monday, and that sound you heard from much of Terps Nation was a big, fat, yawn. This was the exciting new hire that was going to take Maryland football to the next level? This was the guy who was going to bring some sizzle to Byrd Stadium? The guy who'd put fannies in the seats and get the alumni fired up? The guy who'd get the big shots with fat wallets to pony up for all those pricy luxury suites that now sit dark and empty as caves on game day?
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NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | May 4, 1993
WASHINGTON -- In a real about-face for the fire-breathing, order-barking stereotypical drill sergeant of yore, the Army has named a woman as "Drill Sergeant of the Year" for the first time in its history."
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | May 5, 1999
Her brown hair tucked under a camouflage cap, Jessica Chrzanowski punctuates her sentences with "sir" and "ma'am." She marches in lock step with her fellow recruits. She stands at attention with the military bearing of a sergeant.Asked her age, she responds obediently, "Nine, sir."No taller than a rifle, Jessica, of Sykesville, is a member of Carroll County's Young Marines, a program operated by Marine Corps veterans that turns school-age children into raw recruits -- through a rigorous boot camp of reveille, push-ups, sit-ups and marching -- and gives them a strong dose of manners and military values.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | April 1, 1997
The Army's sexual misconduct case at Aberdeen Proving Ground sustained sharp attack yesterday from civil rights activists, defense attorneys, and black soldiers even as Army leaders pressed charges against an 11th black drill sergeant.Staff Sgt. Marvin C. Kelley, 33, of Hartsville, S.C., will face a court-martial on charges of adultery, obstruction of justice, and falsifying a sworn statement. The allegations against the 13-year Army veteran involve three women formerly under his command -- one white and two black.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A high-level Army panel created in the wake of the Aberdeen Proving Ground sex scandal is expected to recommend this month a more stringent selection process for drill sergeants, Pentagon officials say.In making the recommendations, members of the panel hope to make it less likely that drill sergeants such as those prosecuted for sexual misconduct at Aberdeen and other training bases could rise to such positions.Staff Sgt. Delmar G. Simpson, who was convicted of multiple rapes and sodomy at Aberdeen, was selected as a drill sergeant even though he had been removed as platoon sergeant at Fort Hood in Texas for granting favorable treatment to female soldiers.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Tom Bowman and Scott Wilson and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1997
The sayings were common on Army training posts across the nation.Promising young soldiers were said to be "locked in tight."And almost every morning during call-and-response drills came the sergeant's cry: "Company, are you in the game?" "Yes, drill sergeant," came the reply.But at Aberdeen Proving Ground those sayings became code for sexual conquest and shared secrets, a perversion of Army terms that symbolizes a corrupted chain of command.Now, as the Army prosecutes Staff Sgt. Delmar G. Simpson on 19 counts of rape, Aberdeen officers have banned the phrases -- illustrating the skittishness on a base that has become ground zero in a military-wide search for illegal sex in the ranks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Two Army investigations into the service's handling of sexual misconduct have found widespread evidence discrimination by male commanders against female troops, staffing that left too few drill sergeants to supervise troops and a selection system that allowed wife-beaters to become drill sergeants, Army officials and lawmakers said yesterday.Neither inquiry, however, held anyone accountable for the problems, said officials familiar with the reports.These were among the conclusions reached in separate inquiries by the Army inspector general and a panel of senior Army officers and civilians who work for the military, who spent eight months interviewing 35,000 soldiers and commanders at 59 bases worldwide in one of the service's largest such reviews.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Tom Bowman and Scott Wilson and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1997
There were whispered rumors, repeated admissions and unmistakable sightings. Sergeants at Aberdeen Proving Ground were having sex with female soldiers -- in barracks offices, bathrooms and on-post apartments.Yet the drill sergeants who knew or had strong suspicions stayed silent, at least four of them and possibly more. Some even tipped off friends and fellow sergeants participating in what came to be known as "the game" by some of its players, documents and testimony show.Why drill sergeants, the first link in Aberdeen's chain of command, did not report their colleagues is a question that will occupy Army leaders long after the verdict in Staff Sgt. Delmar G. Simpson's rape case.
NEWS
September 13, 1997
MANY FEARED that the Army would respond with a ''bunker mentality'' after reports of widespread sexual harassment in its ranks surfaced last year. This week, the bunker blew up.A report by senior military officials on the sexual climate in the Army, released by the Pentagon, was unflattering, unflinching and unequivocal. It concluded that sexual harassment, ranging from inappropriate comments to job discrimination to assault, is pervasive and must be stopped. Most important, the Army seems to recognize that the problem is not some sociological sidelight which it must address solely to mollify politicians and the public, but a deep, operational ill that hampers the performance of its men and women.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 16, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Seeking to put the 1996 Aberdeen Proving Ground sexual abuse scandal to rest, the Army's inspector general concluded yesterday there was no basis to the charges that military investigators coerced witnesses or targeted only black drill instructors for prosecution.After a seven-month inquiry, the inspector general released a report saying the investigations were conducted in an "unbiased manner."In another case, the report dismissed allegations by Gene McKinney, former sergeant major of the Army and the first black to hold that top enlisted post, that he was targeted for charges of sexual wrongdoing because of his race.
NEWS
September 13, 1997
MANY FEARED that the Army would respond with a ''bunker mentality'' after reports of widespread sexual harassment in its ranks surfaced last year. This week, the bunker blew up.A report by senior military officials on the sexual climate in the Army, released by the Pentagon, was unflattering, unflinching and unequivocal. It concluded that sexual harassment, ranging from inappropriate comments to job discrimination to assault, is pervasive and must be stopped. Most important, the Army seems to recognize that the problem is not some sociological sidelight which it must address solely to mollify politicians and the public, but a deep, operational ill that hampers the performance of its men and women.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 2, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Several midlevel officers at an Aberdeen Proving Ground school, where reports of sexual misconduct last fall spurred an Armywide investigation, are expected to face disciplinary action, Army officials said yesterday.The U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command has recommended to top Army officials that the officers face administrative action, a move that would likely end their careers, said the officials, who would neither release the names nor the ranks of the officers."There are less than a handful of people involved," said one Army official, who requested anonymity.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 31, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Two Army investigations into the service's handling of sexual misconduct have found widespread evidence discrimination by male commanders against female troops, staffing that left too few drill sergeants to supervise troops and a selection system that allowed wife-beaters to become drill sergeants, Army officials and lawmakers said yesterday.Neither inquiry, however, held anyone accountable for the problems, said officials familiar with the reports.These were among the conclusions reached in separate inquiries by the Army inspector general and a panel of senior Army officers and civilians who work for the military, who spent eight months interviewing 35,000 soldiers and commanders at 59 bases worldwide in one of the service's largest such reviews.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Tom Bowman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 4, 1997
WASHINGTON -- A high-level Army panel created in the wake of the Aberdeen Proving Ground sex scandal is expected to recommend this month a more stringent selection process for drill sergeants, Pentagon officials say.In making the recommendations, members of the panel hope to make it less likely that drill sergeants such as those prosecuted for sexual misconduct at Aberdeen and other training bases could rise to such positions.Staff Sgt. Delmar G. Simpson, who was convicted of multiple rapes and sodomy at Aberdeen, was selected as a drill sergeant even though he had been removed as platoon sergeant at Fort Hood in Texas for granting favorable treatment to female soldiers.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 3, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The commanding general of the Army's Aberdeen Proving Ground has decided to retire after admitting that he committed adultery while separated from his wife more than five years ago, Pentagon officials said yesterday.The officials said the commander, Maj. Gen. John Longhouser, became the subject of an inquiry after an anonymous tip about the affair was received over a telephone hot line established because of a flurry of sex abuse cases at Aberdeen, where male drill sergeants had preyed on young female recruits.
NEWS
By Tom Bowman and Robert A. Erlandson and Tom Bowman and Robert A. Erlandson,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Jay Apperson, JoAnna Daemmrich, Dan Thanh Dang, Ronnie Greene and Lisa Respers contributed to this article | November 9, 1996
More Army trainers -- most likely drill instructors -- are expected to be charged with sexual wrongdoing in the scandal that is enveloping an Aberdeen Proving Ground school and now includes at least 17 victims, Army officials said yesterday.Two more drill sergeants will face charges, a top Army official said, in a growing investigation that so far has led to disciplinary action against four drill sergeants and one captain.Charges already filed range from improper relationships with a subordinate to obstruction of justice and rape -- though it was not clear how many alleged rapes were included among the complaints.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | March 18, 1997
After talking with Aberdeen Proving Ground drill sergeants and recruits for four hours yesterday, members of the Congressional Black Caucus called the Army's sexual misconduct probe "contaminated" by coercive investigators and, possibly, racial bias.Rep. Maxine Waters, a California Democrat who chairs the caucus, called for a halt to the military's five-month investigation into allegations brought by 56 women trained at Aberdeen. She also renewed the group's call for a congressional review of the probe; that request was opposed last week by Army Secretary Togo West, who said the Army could handle the politically charged investigation itself.
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Scott Wilson,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1997
The Army dropped the last rape charge pending against any Aberdeen Proving Ground drill sergeant yesterday -- a final retreat from the most serious sexual misconduct allegations raised by top Army officials seven months ago.The decision to drop the single rape count against Staff Sgt. Vernell Robinson, Jr., announced by prosecutors in a post courtroom, means that only one of four Aberdeen soldiers originally charged with raping trainees will be convicted of...
NEWS
By Scott Wilson and Tom Bowman and Scott Wilson and Tom Bowman,SUN STAFF | April 26, 1997
There were whispered rumors, repeated admissions and unmistakable sightings. Sergeants at Aberdeen Proving Ground were having sex with female soldiers -- in barracks offices, bathrooms and on-post apartments.Yet the drill sergeants who knew or had strong suspicions stayed silent, at least four of them and possibly more. Some even tipped off friends and fellow sergeants participating in what came to be known as "the game" by some of its players, documents and testimony show.Why drill sergeants, the first link in Aberdeen's chain of command, did not report their colleagues is a question that will occupy Army leaders long after the verdict in Staff Sgt. Delmar G. Simpson's rape case.
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