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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Staff Writer | June 6, 1993
Union City's final race ended in a horse ambulance parked on a dusty lot by a maintenance shop some 100 yards from the starting gate of the 118th Preakness Stakes.Inside the white van, a covered 20-foot metal stall, Dr. Dan Dreyfuss prepared the lethal injection that quickly would extinguish the life of the 3-year-old colt, whose right front ankle was bent, broken and bloody. The veterinarian emptied a 100 cc bottle of sodium pentabarbitol into three syringes. He then took a needle and stuck it into the horse's neck, on the left side, finding the jugular vein.
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FEATURES
By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 11, 2008
Seacrest's name, in lights, on New Year's Eve Dick Clark is still Mr. New Year's Eve - but he'll be sharing the title with Ryan Seacrest. Starting this December, Clark's longtime end-of-year special will be called Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve With Ryan Seacrest, ABC and dick clark productions has announced. Seacrest will serve as co-host with Clark and as an executive producer on the broadcast for another three years, through the 2010 show ringing in 2011. New Year's Rockin' Eve will mark its 37th year on Dec. 31 and include the customary countdown to midnight from New York City's Times Square.
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FEATURES
By TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 11, 2008
Seacrest's name, in lights, on New Year's Eve Dick Clark is still Mr. New Year's Eve - but he'll be sharing the title with Ryan Seacrest. Starting this December, Clark's longtime end-of-year special will be called Dick Clark's New Year's Rockin' Eve With Ryan Seacrest, ABC and dick clark productions has announced. Seacrest will serve as co-host with Clark and as an executive producer on the broadcast for another three years, through the 2010 show ringing in 2011. New Year's Rockin' Eve will mark its 37th year on Dec. 31 and include the customary countdown to midnight from New York City's Times Square.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | May 15, 2008
Most of Dan Dreyfuss' days don't intersect with catastrophe. He knows that, on some level, he's paid to hang around the Pimlico and Laurel racetracks in case something really bad happens. As a trackside veterinarian, his work is in the news more than ever after the deaths of Barbaro last year and Eight Belles at this year's Kentucky Derby. Dreyfuss doesn't dismiss the impact of thoroughbred deaths. In fact, he can tell you the circumstances of every horse he has had to put down. "If I ever don't get emotional after doing it," he says, "I'll know it's time to find a different line of work."
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,Contributing Writer | September 23, 1993
Sykesville gets a tiny taste of Tinseltown this week with the filming of an as-yet-untitled movie at Springfield Hospital Center. The flick stars Richard Dreyfuss, Linda Hamilton and John Lithgow.Filming is being done in the Lane Building on Springfield's grounds."It was picked because the facility was vacant and has been vacant for a while," said David Linck, unit publicist for Morgan Creek Productions."We're here because we needed a mental health facility."Morgan Creek Productions is run by James Robinson, who is the producer of the movie and a Maryland native.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | May 15, 2008
Most of Dan Dreyfuss' days don't intersect with catastrophe. He knows that, on some level, he's paid to hang around the Pimlico and Laurel racetracks in case something really bad happens. As a trackside veterinarian, his work is in the news more than ever after the deaths of Barbaro last year and Eight Belles at this year's Kentucky Derby. Dreyfuss doesn't dismiss the impact of thoroughbred deaths. In fact, he can tell you the circumstances of every horse he has had to put down. "If I ever don't get emotional after doing it," he says, "I'll know it's time to find a different line of work."
FEATURES
By STEVE McKERROW | November 2, 1991
In a new movie premiering on cable tonight, star/producer Richard Dreyfuss is asked a simple question by his superior in the French army:"Why did he do it?" asks the general, referring to the allegedspying activity of one Capt. Alfred Dreyfus, the central figure in a celebrated turn-of-the century scandal that some historians believe may have contributed to the onset of World War I.One might ask the same question, however, about Mr. Dreyfuss the actor, and his handsomely mounted but curiously inert film, "Prisoner of Honor."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 23, 1993
Sometimes I wonder why studios send out press material with their product. For example, in the press packet with "Another Stakeout," a sequel to the excellent and successful "Stakeout" of 1987, the anonymous PR scribe quotes writer and executive prodSometimes I wonder why studios send out press material with their product. For example, in the press packet with "Another Stakeout," a sequel to the excellent and successful "Stakeout" of 1987, the anonymous PR scribe quotes writer and executive producer Jim Kouf on the subject of why it took so long to get the sequel going: "It wasn't until December, 1991, that I had a story I could get excited about."
BUSINESS
August 21, 1996
They still need financing, a full staff and subscribers, but the creators of an ambitious national news weekly aimed at upscale African-Americans have found a way to begin publishing: electronically, on the World Wide Web.Our World News is now available at http: //www.ourworldnews.com. The downtown Baltimore-based publication is slated to appear on paper by year's end."As we're gearing up, rather than sit around and wait for everything to be in place, we thought it would be worthwhile putting up a Web site and addressing some of the issues" of what the paper will be about, Editor-in-Chief Joel Dreyfuss said yesterday.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1998
Maryland Million Day celebrates the state's thoroughbred industry. From the grooms at the barns to the horse owners in their boxes, everyone involved holds their heads a little higher because of the role they play in one of the state's most important industries.But five years ago, as the revelry of the day approached a crescendo, the celebration died.The ever-popular Root Boy, running near the lead in the Maryland Million Classic, broke down. He lay in the dirt on the Laurel Park backstretch, his right front ankle shattered, his life imperiled.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 22, 2001
With a cast that includes two Oscar winners in Richard Dreyfuss and Marcia Gay Harden, The Education of Max Bickford was one of the more eagerly awaited new dramas of the fall season. But, based on the pilot that premieres tomorrow night at 8 on CBS, the series doesn't appear to be worth getting too excited about. Dreyfuss plays Bickford, an American Studies professor at a small but prestigious college who is in a major life passage. Actually, make that several life passages. After more than two decades of teaching at the college, Bickford is passed over for an endowed chair in favor of Andrea Haskell (Harden)
NEWS
March 2, 2001
Mary Elizabeth Kamphaus, 89, office comptroller Mary Elizabeth Kamphaus, former office comptroller for a pharmaceutical company and an avid hiker, died Feb. 22 at Maryland Shock Trauma Center after being struck that day by an automobile in Towson. She was 89. A longtime resident of the Dulaney Valley Apartments in Towson, Miss Kamphaus began her career in 1932 with Hynson, Wescott & Dunning, a Baltimore pharmaceutical company that was the first manufacturer of Mercurochrome. The company later was merged into Becton Dickinson & Co. She was office comptroller for many years and retired in 1977.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1998
Maryland Million Day celebrates the state's thoroughbred industry. From the grooms at the barns to the horse owners in their boxes, everyone involved holds their heads a little higher because of the role they play in one of the state's most important industries.But five years ago, as the revelry of the day approached a crescendo, the celebration died.The ever-popular Root Boy, running near the lead in the Maryland Million Classic, broke down. He lay in the dirt on the Laurel Park backstretch, his right front ankle shattered, his life imperiled.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | November 15, 1997
Hot on the heels of its triumph with "Cinderella," "The Wonderful World of Disney" takes on "Oliver Twist" (7 p.m.-9 p.m. tomorrow, WMAR, Channel 2) with much of the same exuberance, magic and charm.Just as Whitney Houston did in "Cinderella," Richard Dreyfuss both stars and serves as an executive producer in this production. His performance as Fagin is a magic act in that he manages to make this ancient tutor to a band of child pickpockets in Dickens' London both menacing and likable in a flim-flam-man kind of way.Almost as impressive are the performances of Elijah Wood as the Artful Dodger and Alex Trench as Oliver.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,SUN STAFF | July 8, 1997
The round, Honeywell thermostat on your living room wall.The Trimline, push-button telephone in your den.The Big Ben alarm clock near your bed.It's easy to become convinced that these ubiquitous, unobtrusive objects have existed since the dawn of time. That is part of their success: They streamline our lives. They make each day a little easier. They are easy to use and to ignore.But these objects and the thousands of others that began as luxuries and now seem essentials did not spring into existence ready-made.
BUSINESS
August 21, 1996
They still need financing, a full staff and subscribers, but the creators of an ambitious national news weekly aimed at upscale African-Americans have found a way to begin publishing: electronically, on the World Wide Web.Our World News is now available at http: //www.ourworldnews.com. The downtown Baltimore-based publication is slated to appear on paper by year's end."As we're gearing up, rather than sit around and wait for everything to be in place, we thought it would be worthwhile putting up a Web site and addressing some of the issues" of what the paper will be about, Editor-in-Chief Joel Dreyfuss said yesterday.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | September 22, 2001
With a cast that includes two Oscar winners in Richard Dreyfuss and Marcia Gay Harden, The Education of Max Bickford was one of the more eagerly awaited new dramas of the fall season. But, based on the pilot that premieres tomorrow night at 8 on CBS, the series doesn't appear to be worth getting too excited about. Dreyfuss plays Bickford, an American Studies professor at a small but prestigious college who is in a major life passage. Actually, make that several life passages. After more than two decades of teaching at the college, Bickford is passed over for an endowed chair in favor of Andrea Haskell (Harden)
NEWS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Staff Writer | November 29, 1993
Dan Dreyfuss was making his veterinary rounds on the Laurel backstretch on Oct. 9, listening to the track announcer's call of the Maryland Million Classic, when he heard it: Root Boy had broken down.The 5-year-old horse lay on the track, his right foreleg shattered and bleeding. The colt Union City, after suffering a similar injury in this year's Preakness, had to be destroyed."I drove over there as fast as I could, and could tell right awaythis was a horrible injury," Dr. Dreyfuss said. "[Root Boy]
NEWS
By John Rivera and Suzanne Loudermilk and John Rivera and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | November 7, 1995
Baltimore's Jewish community gathered last night at several vigils to reflect, pray and denounce the violence that took the life of Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, who was buried earlier in the day.At the Chizuk Amuno Congregation in Baltimore County, a night that was to be a fund-raiser for the Associated Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore was turned into "A Gathering for Peace." Actor Richard Dreyfuss, who was to be the keynote speaker for the fund-raiser, reflected on Mr. Rabin, whom he had met on several occasions.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | November 3, 1994
Where were you in '73 when you first saw him? You may not remember, but you remember him. He seemed so unlike any actor of his generation, he beamed with intelligence, passion, compassion. He seemed vividly real -- a high school intellectual who'd actually read some books, who was self-aware and insanely likable, boasted an ironic laugh and was spending himself in the pursuit of a blond sex goddess who, even he understood, he would never get.That was Richard Dreyfuss in George Lucas' "American Graffiti," on the verge of stardom.
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