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Drew Barrymore

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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 29, 2003
NEW YORK - Her father lies seriously ill in a hospital, but she refuses to see him. Her rock-star boyfriend waits for her to finish a long day of interviews. Her new movie, Duplex, opened Friday. If her life were not complicated, it would not be Drew Barrymore's life. The child star turned teen alcoholic turned comeback kid turned Hollywood power babe is trying to slow down. Really. "I still think I'm slightly impulsive," she says in a conversation at the Essex House. "I think we can all relate to that feeling of, `I want it and I want it now.' I'm trying just to be calmer and more mature and learn the lessons I do."
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.Sragow@baltsun.com | October 2, 2009
Watching the Roller Derby movie "Whip It" is like spending roughly two hours with a frisky group of girls in a female empowerment camp. In the young-adult source book of the same name, the heroine, Bliss Cavendar, says in her first-person narration that "for the record, the roller-derby sisterhood is the real thing, not tainted by that fake you-go-girl, Oprah vibe you get from Noxzema commercials." She states she "really knows this" because "no one actually says 'you go, girl,' " - instead they say things like "you rock the house."
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 9, 1999
It's hard to imagine Drew Barrymore's never been kissed.Get beyond that, however, and her performance in "Never Been Kissed" should work on you just fine. The film confirms its star's status as America's sweetheart; if there are people out there who don't find Barrymore utterly charming, it's only because they try real hard to feel that way.Too bad the film, about a budding journalist assigned to do an expose on the degradations of high school life, simply isn't worthy of her. The script displays little feel for either newspapers or high school, as though screenwriters Abby Kohn and Mark Silverstein only know what they've seen in movies.
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By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | March 10, 2009
Will Barrymore direct 'Eclipse'? She starred as a buddy to that lovable alien E.T., but does Drew Barrymore have what it takes to direct vampires? The 34-year-old actress has confirmed that she's being considered for Eclipse, the third movie in the blockbuster teen vamp saga that launched with Twilight last year. "I'm one of the directors that is being talked about, which is great, because I'm a director now," Barrymore said in a recent interview. "But, you know, they'll make their choice."
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By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 26, 1996
"I wanted her to be deliciously sweet," Drew Barrymore says of her doomed sweater chick in "Scream," the Wes Craven homage to slasher flicks now in theaters. "You never want to see bad things happen to a sweet person."Just then, a call comes through to her Manhattan hotel suite. The eeriness of the timing isn't lost on Hollywood's oldest 21-year-old: Her "Scream" character's ordeal begins with a phone call."Hey, isn't that ironic," she says, then bellows: "Aaaaaaaaaaahhhhhh!"The playful scream could probably be heard out on 57th Street, 43 floors below.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 14, 2007
Hugh Grant, that prince of erotic dither, and Drew Barrymore, that queen of sweetly amorous emotion, generate a rare flirtatious zing in Music and Lyrics, an affable farce about a worn-out '80s singer-composer named Alex Fletcher (Grant) from a band called PoP! Barrymore plays Sophie Fisher, a former writing student who comes to his Upper West Side New York apartment to water his plants and ends up nurturing his creativity and finding her life's work as a lyricist. This movie doesn't pretend to be anything more than a cheerful night out, and on that count it scores: It will set a happy mood for couples and a lot of singles, too. PoP!
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,Special to the Sun | January 21, 2001
ARK CITY, Utah -- The shadow of a labor war. The skewering of "Survivor." And the growth of Drew. If any one theme has emerged in the early going of the Sundance Film Festival, it's that there's no central theme at all. Every year, pundits stretch for a common thread, a punchy sound bite: The Year of the Tarantino Knockoffs. The Parker Posey Festival. Not this time. Independent film is meant to avoid compartmentalization anyway, right? Those who still yearn for a single story line will have to content themselves with several: n Despite the grousing about the big studios' imposing presence, Sundance remains a haven for grass-roots filmmakers.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 8, 2005
Baseball, Boston and Drew Barrymore. Certainly sounds like a winning combination. In fact, it is (much as those of us in these parts might insist that second B should be Baltimore, but let's be big about this). Fever Pitch is a delightful romantic comedy that understands as much about the obsessive baseball fan as the chronic workaholic, and daringly suggests they can live under the same roof, provided the concept of give-and-take is not totally foreign to either of them. Barrymore is adorable as Lindsey Meeks, 24/7 career woman whose love life is nonexistent.
NEWS
October 23, 1997
In yesterday's Today article about celebrity hate sites on the Internet, an extra letter was inadvertently put into the Web address for the Drew Barrymore and Gwen Stefani site. The correct address is http: //home.earthlink.net/d_mentia/hehehe.htmlThe Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 10/23/97
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February 16, 2007
BRIDGE TO TERABITHIA Rating -- PG What it's about -- Elementary school outsiders meet, bond and build a fantasy world they can escape into, any time they want. The Kid Attractor Factor -- Trolls and assorted other monsters are battled, as are schoolyard bullies. Good lessons/bad lessons -- Testy parents, cranky teachers, even bullies have a human side. Violence -- Off-camera, mostly. Language -- Pretty clean. Sex -- None. They're fifth-graders. Drugs -- None. Parents advisory -- Even the traumatic stuff is handled off-camera in this faithful adaptation of the classic children's novel.
NEWS
October 24, 2008
Max Payne * 1/2 ( 1 1/2 Stars) $17.6 million $17.6 million 1 week Rated: R Running time: 100 minutes What it's about: Max Payne (Mark Wahlberg, above), a former New York lawman, now the chief librarian of his precinct's cold-case files, chases the most frigid case of all: the murder of his wife and infant child. Our take: You can forgive the slow-mo bullet effects since they're endemic to the genre. What kills Max Payne is that the characters think in slow motion. Beverly Hills Chihuahua * 1/2 ( 1 1/2 Stars)
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By Michael Sragow | September 26, 2008
Tropic Thunder: *** ( 3 STARS) See it now, because unlike the year's other big-star farces, this parody of Vietnam War movies plays better on the big screen. At its best it offers dizzying burlesques of the pretensions and excesses of runaway filmmaking. When director-star Ben Stiller rockets into manic reflections of real 'Nam epics like Apocalypse Now, he displays gifts for frenzy and hyperbole straight out of vintage Mad magazines. No one in the cast is more daring than Robert Downey Jr. as a Russell Crowe-like actor assuming the role of an African-American soldier.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 4, 2007
Lucky You is good at introductions, but doesn't develop far enough beyond some spunky openers and cute come-ons. What's befuddling is that its smart and sensitive director, Curtis Hanson, the mastermind behind L.A. Confidential and Wonder Boys, is usually terrific on the follow-through. In Lucky You, Hanson swiftly fills us in on the Las Vegas scene but rarely connects us to the characters. Hanson shrewdly introduces us to Eric Bana's super-hustler Huck Cheever, a Vegas card shark having a bad run right before the 2003 World Series of Poker, as Huck manages to hock a digital camera to a pawnbroker (Phyllis Somerville)
NEWS
By Nick Madigan and Nick Madigan,sun reporter | February 21, 2007
On the brink of losing his landmark Senator Theatre, Tom Kiefaber said last night he had raised the nearly $110,000 required to stave off today's scheduled foreclosure auction of the 68-year-old Baltimore movie palace. Kiefaber - whose publicized financial travails with the Senator brought a deluge of contributions from people eager to save it from the fate of many single-screen theaters around the country, said he had presented a bank representative with certified checks last night for the amount owed.
FEATURES
February 16, 2007
BRIDGE TO TERABITHIA Rating -- PG What it's about -- Elementary school outsiders meet, bond and build a fantasy world they can escape into, any time they want. The Kid Attractor Factor -- Trolls and assorted other monsters are battled, as are schoolyard bullies. Good lessons/bad lessons -- Testy parents, cranky teachers, even bullies have a human side. Violence -- Off-camera, mostly. Language -- Pretty clean. Sex -- None. They're fifth-graders. Drugs -- None. Parents advisory -- Even the traumatic stuff is handled off-camera in this faithful adaptation of the classic children's novel.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | February 14, 2007
Hugh Grant, that prince of erotic dither, and Drew Barrymore, that queen of sweetly amorous emotion, generate a rare flirtatious zing in Music and Lyrics, an affable farce about a worn-out '80s singer-composer named Alex Fletcher (Grant) from a band called PoP! Barrymore plays Sophie Fisher, a former writing student who comes to his Upper West Side New York apartment to water his plants and ends up nurturing his creativity and finding her life's work as a lyricist. This movie doesn't pretend to be anything more than a cheerful night out, and on that count it scores: It will set a happy mood for couples and a lot of singles, too. PoP!
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By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | February 13, 1998
Adam Sandler's hair looks like a living thing in "The Wedding Singer," but his wiggy mop is somehow appropriate to this goofy send-up of '80s excess and "Material Girl" romance.Comedian Sandler is not only not annoying (a major breakthrough) but is actually charming as Robbie, who sings pop tunes at weddings and has been obsessed with getting married since his parents divorced when he was a kid.The year is 1985, and true to the era, Robbie's band includes a Boy George lookalike whose entire repertoire, on the rare occasions when he sings solo, consists of Culture Club's "Do You Really Want To Hurt Me?"
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 4, 2007
Lucky You is good at introductions, but doesn't develop far enough beyond some spunky openers and cute come-ons. What's befuddling is that its smart and sensitive director, Curtis Hanson, the mastermind behind L.A. Confidential and Wonder Boys, is usually terrific on the follow-through. In Lucky You, Hanson swiftly fills us in on the Las Vegas scene but rarely connects us to the characters. Hanson shrewdly introduces us to Eric Bana's super-hustler Huck Cheever, a Vegas card shark having a bad run right before the 2003 World Series of Poker, as Huck manages to hock a digital camera to a pawnbroker (Phyllis Somerville)
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By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | February 10, 2006
They've given the famous Man in the Yellow Hat a name (Ted), but otherwise all is as it should be in the world of Curious George, a winsome big-screen adaptation of H.A. and Margret Rey's tales of a mischievous monkey and his innocent adventures. The animated film, which adds a few modern touches (a cell phone, for instance), but generally remains true to the original stories, introduces us to George in his native Africa. There, the little guy is a crowd favorite, charming, inquisitive, always with a smile on his face.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 8, 2005
Baseball, Boston and Drew Barrymore. Certainly sounds like a winning combination. In fact, it is (much as those of us in these parts might insist that second B should be Baltimore, but let's be big about this). Fever Pitch is a delightful romantic comedy that understands as much about the obsessive baseball fan as the chronic workaholic, and daringly suggests they can live under the same roof, provided the concept of give-and-take is not totally foreign to either of them. Barrymore is adorable as Lindsey Meeks, 24/7 career woman whose love life is nonexistent.
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