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By Tim Smith | September 9, 2001
The city of Dresden, Germany, has an unusually long and rich musical history; the main orchestra in town, for example, can trace its roots all the way back to 1548. A more recent addition to the thriving cultural scene there is the Kornerscher Sing-Verein Dresden -- the Dresden Korner Chamber Choir, founded in 1993 and named after Christian Gottfried Korner, a musically erudite counselor in the court of Saxony at the turn of the 19th century. The ensemble of two dozen voices, directed by Peter Kopp, specializes in repertoire from the 17th and 18th centuries, which will be featured in its concert this week in Baltimore.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | October 12, 2010
Frank Warner Kussy, a Holocaust survivor who won reparations for damages done to him and his business by both the Nazis and the communist government of East Germany, died of heart failure Oct. 1, less than two weeks short of his 100th birthday. "He was probably unique, in that he fought the German government double-time," said Kenneth Waltzer, director of Jewish Studies at James Madison College at Michigan State University in East Lansing, Mich., who invited Mr. Kussy to speak to his class several times.
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NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Berlin Bureau of The Sun | February 9, 1995
DRESDEN, Germany -- On the apocalyptic night when the British bombers came by the hundreds, Ingeborg Hommelsheim crawled from the cellar of her family's burning home to find the Dresden sky a red dome of fire.It sucked the air from her lungs, burned her hair and tore her suitcase from its handle. Friends who had been caught outdoors earlier were blackened like logs. Those who had sheltered in water tanks were boiled alive.Across the city, American soldier Kurt Vonnegut listened to the attack from deep in a meat locker near a barracks for prisoners of war. Decades later in his novel "Slaughterhouse Five," he would unabashedly call the attack a "massacre" comparable to Hiroshima.
NEWS
By Kathy Hunt and Kathy Hunt,Tribune Media Services | December 3, 2008
Stroll into my kitchen this holiday season, and you'll smell the rich aromas of cinnamon, cardamom, melting chocolate and toasting nuts. Busy making dozens of festive cookies, most would presume. Nope. Instead, I'm carrying on my family's tradition of baking holiday breads. From dried fruit- and nut-studded German stollen to my mom's own quirky walnut loaf, there is no better way to celebrate the season, culinarily speaking, than with fresh, homemade bread. My take on holiday foods is rooted in a long history.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 17, 2002
DRESDEN, Germany - Thousands of people were evacuated from Dresden yesterday as the Elbe River rose to record heights and was expected to rise even more. The river, fed by floodwaters that earlier raced through Prague, rose to more than 29 feet early yesterday, topping its 1845 high of 28.75 feet. It is about five times its normal depth. Officials began the evacuation of up to 33,000 residents from their homes yesterday, starting about two miles downstream from the city center. About 5,000 people had already been forced to leave their homes in the city in recent days, but there are no plans as yet to move people from the city center, a Saxony official spokesman said.
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Reporter | April 13, 2007
So it went. Man born. Man died. Lots of funny stuff written in between. Hi Ho. Kurt Vonnegut - post-modern satirist, king of the catchphrase (should've trademarked "So it goes," old boy), one of America's great rite-of-passage novelists - died Wednesday at 84. Official cause of death: brain injuries suffered in a fall. Or, as Mr. Vonnegut would say, "slipped on God's banana peel." He was a self-described humanist who didn't put much stock in humans, those glorious, hare-brained underachievers.
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,Special to the Sun | October 31, 2004
You can't get lost in Dresden. Wherever you go, you can see the stately white dome of the Frauenkirche, as much a landmark in this eastern German city as St. Peter's is in Rome. It isn't just that the church towers 300 feet above Dresden's lovely baroque skyline, that its colossal dome was an architectural marvel when consecrated in 1734 or that it stood for religious tolerance in a Protestant city ruled by the Catholic electors of Saxony. Even its extraordinary acoustics, which inspired composer Richard Wagner, don't fully explain its profound meaning to Dresden and the world.
FEATURES
By James G. McCollam and James G. McCollam,Copley News Service | September 20, 1992
Q: I have a walnut Mason and Hamlin parlor pump organ. I has 12 gold medallions impressed with "Paris, 1876," "Sweden, 1878," "Philadelphia, 1878," etc. Stamped in gold inside the music rack is "Style 269" and "No. 106897." It plays perfectly, and no restoration of any kind has been done on it. Any history and value will be greatly appreciated. A: Your pump organ was made in the late 1800s. The gold medallions represent prizes that were awarded to the company, not to this particular organ.
TRAVEL
April 16, 2006
Sweet sounds in any language On a visit last summer to Dresden, Germany, we stopped to listen to a quartet under an archway leading toward the Schloss. A small child seemed captivated by the music of Mozart and even danced a little jig. Gary Vikan Baltimore
FEATURES
By Rick Sylvain and Rick Sylvain,Knight-Ridder News Service | September 6, 1992
DRESDEN, Ohio -- Baskets. Washtub-sized baskets line Main Street, bursting with color ful plantings. Along arbored side streets, decorating tended lawns and verandas, are more baskets. At Fifth and Main, tourists do double-takes. There, encircled by flower beds, is the World's Largest Basket. Huge? Picture a rail-car with handles.Fans of hand-woven, hardwood maple baskets tingle at the mere mention of Dresden, east of Columbus. By the bus-load they make pilgrimages here. And it owes it all to an avuncular man named Dave "Popeye" Longaberger.
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Reporter | April 13, 2007
So it went. Man born. Man died. Lots of funny stuff written in between. Hi Ho. Kurt Vonnegut - post-modern satirist, king of the catchphrase (should've trademarked "So it goes," old boy), one of America's great rite-of-passage novelists - died Wednesday at 84. Official cause of death: brain injuries suffered in a fall. Or, as Mr. Vonnegut would say, "slipped on God's banana peel." He was a self-described humanist who didn't put much stock in humans, those glorious, hare-brained underachievers.
TRAVEL
April 16, 2006
Sweet sounds in any language On a visit last summer to Dresden, Germany, we stopped to listen to a quartet under an archway leading toward the Schloss. A small child seemed captivated by the music of Mozart and even danced a little jig. Gary Vikan Baltimore
TRAVEL
By Susan Spano and Susan Spano,Special to the Sun | October 31, 2004
You can't get lost in Dresden. Wherever you go, you can see the stately white dome of the Frauenkirche, as much a landmark in this eastern German city as St. Peter's is in Rome. It isn't just that the church towers 300 feet above Dresden's lovely baroque skyline, that its colossal dome was an architectural marvel when consecrated in 1734 or that it stood for religious tolerance in a Protestant city ruled by the Catholic electors of Saxony. Even its extraordinary acoustics, which inspired composer Richard Wagner, don't fully explain its profound meaning to Dresden and the world.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 17, 2002
DRESDEN, Germany - Thousands of people were evacuated from Dresden yesterday as the Elbe River rose to record heights and was expected to rise even more. The river, fed by floodwaters that earlier raced through Prague, rose to more than 29 feet early yesterday, topping its 1845 high of 28.75 feet. It is about five times its normal depth. Officials began the evacuation of up to 33,000 residents from their homes yesterday, starting about two miles downstream from the city center. About 5,000 people had already been forced to leave their homes in the city in recent days, but there are no plans as yet to move people from the city center, a Saxony official spokesman said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | September 9, 2001
The city of Dresden, Germany, has an unusually long and rich musical history; the main orchestra in town, for example, can trace its roots all the way back to 1548. A more recent addition to the thriving cultural scene there is the Kornerscher Sing-Verein Dresden -- the Dresden Korner Chamber Choir, founded in 1993 and named after Christian Gottfried Korner, a musically erudite counselor in the court of Saxony at the turn of the 19th century. The ensemble of two dozen voices, directed by Peter Kopp, specializes in repertoire from the 17th and 18th centuries, which will be featured in its concert this week in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | January 26, 2001
Psychoanalysis might best be done privately, just doctor and patient. On Wednesday evening at the Kennedy Center's Concert Hall, it took place in full view of a large, attentive audience. On the couch, so to speak, was composer Gustav Mahler. Doing the mental probing was Giuseppe Sinopoli, with the help of the Dresden Staatskapelle, one of Europe's oldest orchestral institutions (453 years and counting). It was quite a session - alternately depressing, exhilarating, hopeful, angry, loving, scary.
NEWS
By Hal Piper and Hal Piper,SUN STAFF | September 15, 1997
DRESDEN, Germany -- All over Central Europe, countries are reclaiming their history.Generations of grime are being scraped away to reveal the beauty of Dresden, Leipzig, Prague and other one-time cultural capitals.Statues of alabaster alternate with statues of soot on the ramparts of Dresden's Zwinger art museum. Freshly painted and gilded facades gleam next to gray and dowdy facades of peeling paint, crumbling plaster and exposed brick.Beyond physical renewal, the front-line states of the Cold War -- Poland, the Czech Republic, Hungary, the former East Germany and even West Germany -- are reinterpreting their history.
NEWS
January 24, 1999
Norman L. Dresden, 72, trucking company executiveNorman L. Dresden, a retired trucking company executive who lived in White Marsh, died Monday from complications of diabetes at Sinai Hospital. He was 72.Mr. Dresden retired in August from ABF Freight Lines in Baltimore, where he had been director of government sales for more than 22 years.Earlier, Mr. Dresden, who began his trucking career in Chicago, worked for the Transcon and Pacific Intermountain Express trucking companies in sales.Born and raised in Chicago, where he graduated from high school, he served in the Navy during World War II in the Pacific.
TOPIC
By Ernest F. Imhoff | December 31, 2000
IT IS JUST A SMALL family irony, but interesting. The death Dec. 6 of Werner Klemperer, 80, a star in the comedy TV show "Hogan's Heroes," refocused attention on an old controversy over the propriety of deriving humor from a Nazi prisoner-of-war camp, picturing it as a wacky place where fictional bumbling German officers were outwitted each week by their clever American captives. Klemperer played the Nazi prison commander and chief buffoon, Col. Wilhelm Klink. The show ran from 1965 to 1971 and is now seen in reruns.
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