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By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2008
Kirk Dreier Senior naturalist Oregon Ridge Nature Center, Cockeysville Salary: $60,000 Age: 48 Years on the job : 21 How he got started : With a degree in natural science from West Virginia University, Dreier began his career with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation as a field ecologist and educator. At the same time, he also worked part time at the Baltimore County Department of Recreation and Parks' Oregon Ridge Nature Center. In 1987, he left the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, and switched to full-time employment at the nature center.
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BUSINESS
By NANCY JONES-BONBREST and NANCY JONES-BONBREST,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 28, 2008
Kirk Dreier Senior naturalist Oregon Ridge Nature Center, Cockeysville Salary: $60,000 Age: 48 Years on the job : 21 How he got started : With a degree in natural science from West Virginia University, Dreier began his career with the Chesapeake Bay Foundation as a field ecologist and educator. At the same time, he also worked part time at the Baltimore County Department of Recreation and Parks' Oregon Ridge Nature Center. In 1987, he left the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, and switched to full-time employment at the nature center.
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BUSINESS
November 12, 2001
Insider transactions of 1,000 shares or more for public companies based in Maryland or with operations here. Insiders are officers, directors or owners of 10 percent or more of a corporation's stock. Ryland Group Inc. R.C. Dreier, chairman of the board, exercised an option for 10,000 shares of common at $19.63 each on Oct. 24 and sold 10,000 shares for $49.50 each on Oct. 24. Dreier now directly and indirectly holds 163,717 shares. Insider Trading is compiled by Thomson Financial/First Call.
NEWS
By David Anderson and David Anderson,SUN STAFF | November 17, 2003
Kirk Dreier sits on a wooden stool, hacking away at a log that will eventually become a bowl. The 44-year-old "living historian" uses an adz to shape the wood. He has made most of the furniture and other wooden implements in Fort Garrison, a 300-year-old stone structure in the middle of a residential Pikesville neighborhood, using such Colonial-era tools. Dreier, a park naturalist and director of the Oregon Ridge Nature Center, has been arranging presentations about the fort -- the oldest standing fort in Maryland -- since the late 1980s as part of Oregon Ridge's special-events program.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1999
Chad Dreier didn't have to rely on numbers that showed the Ryland Group Inc.'s sales had hit an all-time quarterly high at the start of this year to know that the Columbia homebuilder's long and at times grinding turnaround had finally taken hold.Dreier, Ryland's chairman and chief executive officer, realized the company had turned the corner when he was approached by a competitor at an industry conference in New York late last month.The homebuilder said he wanted to work with Ryland to build homes in a new community.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | January 15, 1995
The future of the Ryland Group Inc. may very well lie within four spacious, elegantly decorated model homes about a mile from its Columbia headquarters.Beyond their amenities -- large windows, higher ceilings and option packages ranging from entertainment rooms to offices -- the homes represent Ryland's revamped attitude and one of its first attempts to shed its generic image.The Trails at Woodlot, a 66-acre site where 56 single-family, detached homes and 32 townhouses are slated, also marks the first involvement in a Ryland project by R. Chad Dreier, the firm's president and chief executive since November 1993.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2001
For most people, the Easter holiday or the first crack of the baseball bat signifies winter's dusk and spring's dawn. But at the Oregon Ridge Nature Center in Cockeysville, the closing weeks of February and start of March mean one thing: sap time. Over the past two weekends, hundreds of Baltimore-area residents joined center naturalists hiking the woods, helping to tap clear, runny sap from maple trees. And like the postal service mantra boasting that neither rain nor snow will prevent deliveries, inclement weather couldn't hinder yesterday's sap tap. Dozens of area residents braved the elements to experience the annual ritual.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | November 30, 1993
Ryland Group Inc. of Columbia yesterday tapped the finance chief of a smaller West Coast competitor to be its new president and chief executive, a choice a Wall Street analyst said was "better than I thought they could get."R. Chad Dreier started his new job yesterday, Ryland said, taking the helm of the nation's third-largest homebuilding company.He replaces Roger W. Schipke, who left unexpectedly in August to become the head of Sunbeam-Oster Co., a Rhode Island-based small appliance company.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | July 29, 1994
Ryland Group Inc. said yesterday its second-quarter earnings rose 32 percent, but the company's profit margins still lag industry standards, a leading analyst says.R. Chad Dreier, Ryland's new chief executive, said the company was encouraged by improvements in its homebuilding business, but he said that many of the reforms he's instituted haven't been in place long enough to improve profits."We have a long way to go yet," Mr. Dreier said. "You are going to see more [improvement] next year."
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1999
The Ryland Group Inc., on the heels of announcing plans to relocate its corporate headquarters to Southern California from Columbia, said yesterday that its third-quarter earnings and home sales shattered previous high-water marks.The homebuilder's net income of $18.1 million, or $1.21 per share, nearly doubled its results from the comparable quarter that ended Sept. 30 a year ago. The company's homebuilding pretax earnings of $35.4 million rose 41 percent compared with the third quarter of 1998.
BUSINESS
November 12, 2001
Insider transactions of 1,000 shares or more for public companies based in Maryland or with operations here. Insiders are officers, directors or owners of 10 percent or more of a corporation's stock. Ryland Group Inc. R.C. Dreier, chairman of the board, exercised an option for 10,000 shares of common at $19.63 each on Oct. 24 and sold 10,000 shares for $49.50 each on Oct. 24. Dreier now directly and indirectly holds 163,717 shares. Insider Trading is compiled by Thomson Financial/First Call.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | February 26, 2001
For most people, the Easter holiday or the first crack of the baseball bat signifies winter's dusk and spring's dawn. But at the Oregon Ridge Nature Center in Cockeysville, the closing weeks of February and start of March mean one thing: sap time. Over the past two weekends, hundreds of Baltimore-area residents joined center naturalists hiking the woods, helping to tap clear, runny sap from maple trees. And like the postal service mantra boasting that neither rain nor snow will prevent deliveries, inclement weather couldn't hinder yesterday's sap tap. Dozens of area residents braved the elements to experience the annual ritual.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | October 28, 1999
The Ryland Group Inc., on the heels of announcing plans to relocate its corporate headquarters to Southern California from Columbia, said yesterday that its third-quarter earnings and home sales shattered previous high-water marks.The homebuilder's net income of $18.1 million, or $1.21 per share, nearly doubled its results from the comparable quarter that ended Sept. 30 a year ago. The company's homebuilding pretax earnings of $35.4 million rose 41 percent compared with the third quarter of 1998.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1999
The Ryland Group Inc.'s No. 2 executive for nearly five years intends to leave the Columbia-based homebuilder at the end of this month.Michael D. Mangan, a Ryland executive vice president and its chief financial officer, will resign from the company "to pursue other personal and professional opportunities," the company said.Mangan joined Ryland in November 1994 as part of a management restructuring led by R. Chad Dreier, the company's chairman and chief executive officer.In recent quarters, after several dismal performances, Ryland appears to have turned a corner financially.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | April 23, 1999
The Ryland Group Inc. reported yesterday that its earnings more than doubled in the first three months of this year to $10.1 million, on the strength of the largest quarterly sales volume in the company's 32-year history.The Columbia homebuilder's first-quarter profit rose to 67 cents per share vs. 30 cents per share in the comparable period a year ago.With the positive results, Ryland's board opted to extend the contract of Chairman and Chief Executive Officer R. Chad Dreier through at least 2003.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | April 18, 1999
Chad Dreier didn't have to rely on numbers that showed the Ryland Group Inc.'s sales had hit an all-time quarterly high at the start of this year to know that the Columbia homebuilder's long and at times grinding turnaround had finally taken hold.Dreier, Ryland's chairman and chief executive officer, realized the company had turned the corner when he was approached by a competitor at an industry conference in New York late last month.The homebuilder said he wanted to work with Ryland to build homes in a new community.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | April 19, 1992
CARNEY -- Defying the lingering winter weather wasn't easy, but a group of determined wildflower watchers spent yesterday afternoon hunting for specks of color among the grays and browns in Krause Memorial Park.They were so hungry for signs of spring, they even ate a few of their finds -- chives, violets, white mustard and winter cress.But the cold days have slowed most of the flowers and trees from showing their true colors."We had more winter in March than we had in the winter," said Mary Scott of Ruxton, one of the seven people who showed up for the wildflower hike.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1995
The Ryland Group Inc. plans to step up internal cost-control measures in 1995 in response to a nationwide downward spiral of new-home sales and construction, the company's chairman said at its annual shareholders meeting yesterday.Ryland Chairman and Chief Executive R. Chad Dreier's comments about the future of the Columbia-based company, the nation's third-largest homebuilder, came one day after the U.S. Commerce Department reported that the pace of home building slumped nearly 8 percent last month to a two-year low."
BUSINESS
By Kristine Henry and Kristine Henry,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1998
A strong housing market and more attention to costs are helping the Ryland Group Inc. maintain the turnaround it saw at the end of last year.The Columbia-based homebuilder, which suffered sluggish sales in 1997, said yesterday that earnings in the second quarter were $8.8 million, or 58 cents a share, a 128 percent jump from the $3.9 million it reported for the year-ago quarter. Revenue in the quarter, which ended June 30, increased 6.5 percent to $426 million."It's a combination of everything we've talked about for a long time -- better land positions, better floor plans and more attention to direct costs," said R. Chad Dreier, Ryland's chairman and chief executive.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,Sun Staff Writer | April 20, 1995
The Ryland Group Inc. plans to step up internal cost-control measures in 1995 in response to a nationwide downward spiral of new-home sales and construction, the company's chairman said at its annual shareholders meeting yesterday.Ryland Chairman and Chief Executive R. Chad Dreier's comments about the future of the Columbia-based company, the nation's third-largest homebuilder, came one day after the U.S. Commerce Department reported that the pace of home building slumped nearly 8 percent last month to a two-year low."
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