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NEWS
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and Sarah Kickler Kelber,Sun Staff | November 17, 2002
Hanukkah is quickly approaching (it starts Nov. 29 at sundown), but ZYZYX! is ready. Through Nov. 30, the store is holding a menorah and dreidel show, with more than 250 pieces in styles ranging from traditional silver filigree to colorful fused glass. Among the featured artists are Ben-Zion David, an eighth-generation Yemenite silversmith whose intricate filigree menorahs and dreidels (inset, right) intertwine traditional motifs with modern designs, and Zachary Oxman, a Bethesda-based craftsman whose cast bronze menorahs feature leaping and airborne dancers (right)
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NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 2004
As Jewish people around the world celebrate the miracle of Hanukkah, many living in the United States likely will reflect upon the challenge of maintaining their religious identity, said a local rabbi. In the Hanukkah tale, "the Jewish people were fighting for the right to be Jewish," Rabbi Mark J. Panoff recently told about 20 high school sophomores in the confirmation class at Temple Isaiah in Fulton. Confirmation class involves students learning how Judaism plays a role in their lives.
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NEWS
By Tawanda W. Johnson and Tawanda W. Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 10, 2004
As Jewish people around the world celebrate the miracle of Hanukkah, many living in the United States likely will reflect upon the challenge of maintaining their religious identity, said a local rabbi. In the Hanukkah tale, "the Jewish people were fighting for the right to be Jewish," Rabbi Mark J. Panoff recently told about 20 high school sophomores in the confirmation class at Temple Isaiah in Fulton. Confirmation class involves students learning how Judaism plays a role in their lives.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | December 1, 2002
Let's all get into the holiday spirit, as expressed by the festive song heard so very often on the radio at this time of year: " Jingle bell, jingle bell, jingle bell rock!" "Jingle bell . . ." BANG! That was the festive sound of the radio being struck with a hammer by reader Sarah Frates, who writes to say she is sick of "Jingle Bell Rock." She also states that her husband, Ralph, is not a big fan of "The Little Drummer Boy." I am with Ralph on that. Oh, sure, "The Little Drummer Boy" is a beautiful song, for maybe the first 35 minutes.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | December 1, 2002
Let's all get into the holiday spirit, as expressed by the festive song heard so very often on the radio at this time of year: " Jingle bell, jingle bell, jingle bell rock!" "Jingle bell . . ." BANG! That was the festive sound of the radio being struck with a hammer by reader Sarah Frates, who writes to say she is sick of "Jingle Bell Rock." She also states that her husband, Ralph, is not a big fan of "The Little Drummer Boy." I am with Ralph on that. Oh, sure, "The Little Drummer Boy" is a beautiful song, for maybe the first 35 minutes.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | December 10, 2000
Hanukkah, the Jewish festival of rededication and lights, is a time of celebration, when families gather together and revel not only in one another's company, but also in the miracle found within a successful revolution against an ancient oppressor. Back in 164 B.C., the regions of Syria, Egypt and Palestine were under the control of Antiochus IV, a tyrant who made it his goal to eradicate Jewish people and their religion. Two groups rose in opposition to Antiochus, and after three years of fighting and revolt, drove the Syrians from Israel and took back their religious freedom and their temple.
NEWS
December 9, 2001
JUST FOR PARENTS Advice and strategies to help your children read Holiday Hanukkah is a festival of lights Exploring the ways everyone has of celebrating together at this time of the year helps people feel connected to each other during the holiday season. Tonight Jews around the world will celebrate the first night of Hanukkah, The Festival of Lights. This holiday commemorates events that took place over 2,300 years ago in the land of Judea, which is now Israel. Long ago the Syrian King, Antiochus, ordered the Jewish people to reject their God, their religion and their customs.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
So Mickey Mouse is Jewish?Albert Einstein we know was Jewish. Isaac Stern and Itzhak Perlman, of course, are Jewish. Barbra Streisand, a Yentl if not a yenta. Bob Dylan, now and again Jewish. Manischewitz wine and Hebrew National salami, absolutely kosher.Mickey Mouse? Who knew?But with Hanukkah starting tomorrow night, there he is on the cover of a catalog called "The Source for Everything Jewish," decorating a menorah, spinning a dreidel with Minnie. That's a traditional Hanukkah game: You spin the dreidel -- a four-sided top -- and you win or lose Hanukkah gelt (money)
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | December 10, 1995
At their annual symposium, the American Institute of Floral Designers had plenty of ideas about making the season bright. Here are some of the best:* Use rich colors. Vary traditional red and green with cranberry, plum and terra cotta, and sage, basil and emerald. To coordinate with your decor, accent with unexpected colors like mustard, copper and purple. These are also good for those celebrating winter holidays besides Christmas.* Living trees continue to grow in popularity, particularly with the longer entertaining season.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | December 13, 1991
After a particularly exciting school day, Daisong Tan went home and taught his parents, who are Chinese, to say "Merry Christmas" -- in Polish. Lydia Legg added another item to her Christmas wish list: a dreidel. And George Bilias wondered how he could convince his family to not only celebrate Christmas, but Hanukkah and Kwanza, too.Welcome to the holiday season of many colors. At public schools throughout the state, students are being given a secular lesson about the diverse ways ethnic groups celebrate.
NEWS
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and Sarah Kickler Kelber,Sun Staff | November 17, 2002
Hanukkah is quickly approaching (it starts Nov. 29 at sundown), but ZYZYX! is ready. Through Nov. 30, the store is holding a menorah and dreidel show, with more than 250 pieces in styles ranging from traditional silver filigree to colorful fused glass. Among the featured artists are Ben-Zion David, an eighth-generation Yemenite silversmith whose intricate filigree menorahs and dreidels (inset, right) intertwine traditional motifs with modern designs, and Zachary Oxman, a Bethesda-based craftsman whose cast bronze menorahs feature leaping and airborne dancers (right)
NEWS
December 9, 2001
JUST FOR PARENTS Advice and strategies to help your children read Holiday Hanukkah is a festival of lights Exploring the ways everyone has of celebrating together at this time of the year helps people feel connected to each other during the holiday season. Tonight Jews around the world will celebrate the first night of Hanukkah, The Festival of Lights. This holiday commemorates events that took place over 2,300 years ago in the land of Judea, which is now Israel. Long ago the Syrian King, Antiochus, ordered the Jewish people to reject their God, their religion and their customs.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,Sun Staff | December 10, 2000
Hanukkah, the Jewish festival of rededication and lights, is a time of celebration, when families gather together and revel not only in one another's company, but also in the miracle found within a successful revolution against an ancient oppressor. Back in 164 B.C., the regions of Syria, Egypt and Palestine were under the control of Antiochus IV, a tyrant who made it his goal to eradicate Jewish people and their religion. Two groups rose in opposition to Antiochus, and after three years of fighting and revolt, drove the Syrians from Israel and took back their religious freedom and their temple.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | December 4, 1996
So Mickey Mouse is Jewish?Albert Einstein we know was Jewish. Isaac Stern and Itzhak Perlman, of course, are Jewish. Barbra Streisand, a Yentl if not a yenta. Bob Dylan, now and again Jewish. Manischewitz wine and Hebrew National salami, absolutely kosher.Mickey Mouse? Who knew?But with Hanukkah starting tomorrow night, there he is on the cover of a catalog called "The Source for Everything Jewish," decorating a menorah, spinning a dreidel with Minnie. That's a traditional Hanukkah game: You spin the dreidel -- a four-sided top -- and you win or lose Hanukkah gelt (money)
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large | December 10, 1995
At their annual symposium, the American Institute of Floral Designers had plenty of ideas about making the season bright. Here are some of the best:* Use rich colors. Vary traditional red and green with cranberry, plum and terra cotta, and sage, basil and emerald. To coordinate with your decor, accent with unexpected colors like mustard, copper and purple. These are also good for those celebrating winter holidays besides Christmas.* Living trees continue to grow in popularity, particularly with the longer entertaining season.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | December 13, 1991
After a particularly exciting school day, Daisong Tan went home and taught his parents, who are Chinese, to say "Merry Christmas" -- in Polish. Lydia Legg added another item to her Christmas wish list: a dreidel. And George Bilias wondered how he could convince his family to not only celebrate Christmas, but Hanukkah and Kwanza, too.Welcome to the holiday season of many colors. At public schools throughout the state, students are being given a secular lesson about the diverse ways ethnic groups celebrate.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | December 13, 1991
After a particularly exciting school day, Daisong Tan went home and taught his parents, who are Chinese, to say "Merry Christmas" -- in Polish. Lydia Legg added another item to her Christmas wish list: a dreidel. And George Bilias wondered how he could convince his family to not only celebrate Christmas, but Hanukkah and Kwanza, too.Welcome to the holiday season of many colors. At public schools throughout the state, students are being given a secular lesson about the diverse ways ethnic groups celebrate.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff writer | December 11, 1991
For a few moments Friday night, the only light in Baker Chapel came from the white bulbs on the Christmas trees, the altar candles and the candles held carefully by the congregation.Despite the blackness and coldness of the night, the high-ceilinged sanctuary glowed withthe flickering candlelight and warmth of a group of people at peace.The annual December Service of Lights at Western Maryland Collegeserves a twofold purpose, said coordinators of the event."It's an annual event for the last night of classes for the fall semester," said Joanne Goldwater, director of housing.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey | December 13, 1991
After a particularly exciting school day, Daisong Tan went home and taught his parents, who are Chinese, to say "Merry Christmas" -- in Polish. Lydia Legg added another item to her Christmas wish list: a dreidel. And George Bilias wondered how he could convince his family to not only celebrate Christmas, but Hanukkah and Kwanza, too.Welcome to the holiday season of many colors. At public schools throughout the state, students are being given a secular lesson about the diverse ways ethnic groups celebrate.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Staff writer | December 11, 1991
For a few moments Friday night, the only light in Baker Chapel came from the white bulbs on the Christmas trees, the altar candles and the candles held carefully by the congregation.Despite the blackness and coldness of the night, the high-ceilinged sanctuary glowed withthe flickering candlelight and warmth of a group of people at peace.The annual December Service of Lights at Western Maryland Collegeserves a twofold purpose, said coordinators of the event."It's an annual event for the last night of classes for the fall semester," said Joanne Goldwater, director of housing.
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