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Dredging

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NEWS
By Larry Carson | April 4, 2010
People who enjoy walking along the paved footpath around Columbia's Lake Elkhorn will find their route blocked as dredging has resumed and the footbridge at the lake's far end is to be removed for about two months. Other portions of the path might also be blocked temporarily as the months of work continue, according to the Columbia Association, which owns the lake. The $5.2 million project began last fall but was delayed by winter, because freezing temperatures interfere with removing water from the dredged sediment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
2500 B.C.: The earliest evidence of oyster harvesting - shell deposits called middens - indicate that people living in the Chesapeake region were eating oysters and other shellfish as long as early as 2,500 B.C. 1600s: Early colonial settlers frequently remark on the size and quantity of oysters in the Chesapeake Bay. Oysters were likely harvested using boats, rakes and by wading into shallow water to simply gather them. 1700s: Around 1700, oyster harvesters began using tongs to retrieve oysters from the water.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson | January 17, 2010
After more than two months of preparations to dredge Columbia's Lake Elkhorn, the project was shut down for the winter before any sediment was drawn from the lake. According to a Columbia Association announcement, the freezing temperatures made it impossible to use equipment designed to extract the water from the silt. Work stopped just before Christmas and is expected to resume around mid-March. Currently, the lake is frozen over. The Columbia Association is also awaiting a waiver approval from the Maryland Department of the Environment that is required before dredging can begin, a spokeswoman said.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | February 22, 2014
Kathleen Willey is back. For people who have forgotten, she is the former volunteer aide to President Bill Clinton who claims he sexually harassed her 20 years ago. She wrote a book about it called "Target: Caught in the Crosshairs of Bill and Hillary Clinton. " What, you say you didn't read it? Neither, it seems, did most of America, which long ago yawned at Bill Clinton's exploits and Hillary's apparent enabling of his extramarital liaisons. Ms. Willey is telling anyone who will listen that "Hillary Clinton is the real war on women" because of the way she treated her and the other women who accused Bill Clinton of sexual harassment.
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | April 22, 2013
The bad news is that the smaller of the two lakes that make up Laurel Lakes is almost filled in with trees, bushes, cattails and other shrubbery. Only a small portion of that upper lake, near Oxford Street, has a section of water visible from the decks of the surrounding town houses along its banks. The good news is that some time next year, Prince George's County officials, who have authority over the water in the lakes, plan to dredge the upper lake, something many local residents have been calling for over the past 10 years.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | January 13, 2011
Columbia Association President Phillip Nelson wants to put $500,000 a year aside for future dredging of the town's three man-made lakes, even as a $15 million scouring of the lake bottoms continues. "We just don't want to let [the cost] build up until it's $10 [million] to $15 million again," Nelson said about asking the CA board to approve the idea as part of the new capital budget that takes effect May 1. Although Wilde Lake, the smallest of the three, has been dredged several times since it was built, the huge work at 27-acre Lake Kittamaqundi and 37-acre Lake Elkhorn represents the first systematic dredging since they were built in the years just after Columbia's founding in the late 1960s.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2010
Columbia officials agreed Thursday to spend another $1.2 million to complete the dredging of Columbia's largest lake, bringing the total cost of the project to $6.5 million, according to two Columbia Association board members. Dredging of the town's two other lakes, Kittamaqundi, and Wilde lake, are soon to get underway. The Columbia Association board approved shifting $700,000 in excess funds from the Wilde Lake project to Elkhorn, and added $488,000 more. Consultants had reported that far more sediment had washed into Elkhorn and Kittamaqundi since 2006 ,when original measurements for the work were taken, so the cost to reach the desired depths rose.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2011
Fifteen residents who live beside Columbia's algae-choked Lake Elkhorn are sponsoring a public meeting Tuesday night to inform the public about the 37-acre lake's prospects. The residents of Swan Point, a townhouse community on the lake's northern shore, were upset when a long-planned dredging project suddenly stopped in March, before the job was finished. The Pennsylvania contractor filed a $1 million suit against the Columbia Association, the lake's owner, contending that it failed to pay the full bill for the work.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2010
The Columbia Association is moving toward approving half the additional money needed to dredge Lake Kittamaqundi to the depth originally planned after heavy storms in the past four years dumped unexpectedly high levels of silt into it. Thursday night, a CA committee of two board members — Suzanne Waller of Town Center and Kathleen Dragovich of Dorsey's Search — accepted a staff proposal to recommend that the full board add $1.3 million...
NEWS
By TYRONE RICHARDSON and TYRONE RICHARDSON,SUN REPORTER | October 26, 2005
The Columbia Association board of directors has agreed to allocate more than $8 million for dredging Lakes Elkhorn and Kittamaqundi. At its prebudget workshop last weekend, board members agreed to assign $5 million to dredge Lake Kittamaqundi and $3.1 million to dredge Lake Elkhorn. The costs would be divided between the next two fiscal years. The new funding will add to the nearly $3 million in already-approved local and state funds for the projects. According to the budget workshop report, the initial $2.8 million planned for the fiscal 2007 fiscal budget to dredge Lake Kittamaqundi was no longer adequate.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
A $1 trillion spending bill passed by Congress late Thursday — averting another shutdown by funding the government through October — directs tens of millions of dollars to the port of Baltimore and will keep airport control towers open across the state. The port funding, about $60 million, consists mostly of appropriations for dredging projects. The bill includes about $21 million for the Coast Guard Yard at Curtis Bay. Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, a Maryland Democrat who helped steer the bill as chairwoman of the Appropriations Committee, called the legislation an "investment in the lives and livelihoods of those who depend on clean and open waterways" that will "keep businesses open and keep people working.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2014
Officials in Maryland don't know how feasible it is to turn dredged muck from the bottom of Baltimore's shipping channels into a commercially viable construction material — but they are looking to find out. The Maryland Department of Transportation and the Maryland Port Administration recently requested information from a variety of private companies on best practices in turning the sludgy dredged material at its Cox Creek Dredged Material Containment...
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 23, 2013
A measure that would allow Maryland to continue to unload huge quantities of dredging spoils on islands in the Chesapeake Bay — an effort considered critical for the port of Baltimore — won broad bipartisan support Wednesday in the ordinarily divided House of Representatives. The 417-3 House vote to approve an $8 billion water bill cleared the way for negotiations with the Senate on a final legislative package that state officials hope will be even more advantageous for state shipping operations.
NEWS
May 17, 2013
Remarks by President Barack Obama this afternoon at Ellicott Dredges in Baltimore, from the White House.   THE PRESIDENT:  Hello, Baltimore!  (Applause.)  Well, it is wonderful to see all of you.  Give Duncan a big round of applause for the great introduction.  (Applause.)  I want to thank all of you for the warm welcome, the great hospitality.  And I tell you what, I'm going to return the favor by hosting your Super Bowl Champion Baltimore Ravens at the White House this summer.  (Applause.)
NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | April 22, 2013
The bad news is that the smaller of the two lakes that make up Laurel Lakes is almost filled in with trees, bushes, cattails and other shrubbery. Only a small portion of that upper lake, near Oxford Street, has a section of water visible from the decks of the surrounding town houses along its banks. The good news is that some time next year, Prince George's County officials, who have authority over the water in the lakes, plan to dredge the upper lake, something many local residents have been calling for over the past 10 years.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2013
Sparrows Point's landowner turned down a Maryland Port Administration offer to use part of the property for containing dredge material, but both sides said Wednesday that it's not the final word. "We're not really taking this at all as a closed-door situation," said port spokesman Richard Scher, who said the rejection came last week. "This is part of negotiating, and we recognize that. " Scher said the port has a meeting next week with Environmental Liability Transfer, which owns the land and some of the buildings on the former steel-mill property.
NEWS
By Tyrone Richardson and Tyrone Richardson,Sun reporter | August 30, 2006
After years of delays, plans for the dredging of Columbia's lakes Kittamaqundi and Elkhorn are moving forward, as Columbia Association official are weighing technical proposals and hoping to award a contract by as soon as May. For years, both manmade lakes have been overcome with algae and sediment, a soupy mixture threatening to turn them into marshland if left untouched. Over the years, however, the Columbia Association's board of directors has put off dredging in favor of other capital projects.
NEWS
By Adam Sachs and Adam Sachs,Sun Staff Writer | May 27, 1994
The Columbia Council last night rejected a proposal to expand the Wilde Lake dredging project, disappointing a group of Wilde Lake village residents who have done research and field observations to support their contention that too much harmful muck will remain in the lake when the job is completed."
NEWS
January 20, 2013
Shame on you, Baltimore Sun, for the article on "Shadow over Ray Lewis' life" (Jan. 11). At a time when many of us are celebrating a the conclusion of a glorious sports career with Ray's announced retirement, you choose to publish this article detailing events of 13 years ago. This unfortunate episode involving Mr. Lewis' personal life has been examined and re-examined ad-nauseum throughout his career. Why would you choose to bring it up again at this time? Yes, this was a tragic event.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2013
The Army Corps of Engineers expects to lift navigational restrictions on the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal this week after emergency dredging removed shoaling that emerged in November. At 14 miles long and 450 feet wide, the canal is a major artery for the port of Baltimore, carrying more than 40 percent of the port's shipping traffic: roll-on, roll-off cargo, cars, fuel and coal. So when an approach to the canal becomes clogged with muck that threatens to imperil as many as 50 ships that regularly make deliveries to Baltimore — as happened to the access from the Chesapeake Bay — the folks who maintain the canal will make the earth move to restore circulation.
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