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By Gregory J. Wallance | March 6, 2007
Today is the 150th anniversary of the Supreme Court's infamous 1857 decision in Dred Scott v. Sandford, which paved the way for the Civil War. One elite New York City high school is requiring its advanced American history students to read the multiple opinions written by the Dred Scott justices. If there is a better way to keep students from learning what happened in the Dred Scott case, I can't think of one. The ruling is an incomprehensible mess, a hodgepodge of pro-slave-state racist sentiment dressed up as legal opinion.
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NEWS
October 29, 2013
I am appalled that certain high and mighty Baltimore City Council members want to outlaw panhandling (" City Council members push to crack down on panhandling," Oct. 22). This is how the political class thrives. Not a day passes when I don't get an online come on from a politician. I strongly suspect I'm not the only one and that it doesn't seem to matter if you give or not or which side of the political spectrum you favor. Begging is clearly a bipartisan phenomenon. And while no one with half a soul left wants to make the plight of the homeless any more miserable than it is already, professional politicians already have approval ratings on par with communists and the Ku Klux Klan - particularly Congress in light of their recent shutdown.
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NEWS
By Nicholas Varga | February 13, 1998
PEOPLE who have seen producer Steven Spielberg's gripping film "Amistad," about an infamous slave-ship mutiny, know that the U.S. Supreme Court released the African captives in 1841 even though they had been charged with murder.Many people also know that the Supreme Court in 1857 denied freedom to Dred Scott, although he had lived for four years in areas of the United States where slavery was prohibited.Some wonder how the Supreme Court, acting under the same Constitution, could produce such apparently contradictory decisions.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | November 17, 2009
A bronze plaque honoring slave Dred Scott and his wife Harriet will be unveiled at ceremonies today in front of Frederick's City Hall. The plaque and granite pedestal is adjacent to an older monument to Roger Brooke Taney, the U.S. Supreme Court chief justice who lived in Frederick and whose controversial decision in the Dred Scott case of 1856 said that slaves had no rights under the U.S. Constitution. Historians have noted that the Dred Scott Decision put an end to the Missouri Compromise, which allowed slavery in some states and prohibited it in others, and exacerbated the divisions between the North and the South.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1999
Amid the ornate mausoleums of the prominent, rich and powerful interred at St. Louis' Calvary Cemetery sits a simple headstone marking the grave of a man who lent his name to one of the U.S. Supreme Court's most notorious decisions.Dred Scott was a slave who filed a lawsuit to win his freedom from his masters. After years of litigation, he lost. Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney, a Marylander, wrote that slaves were property protected by the Constitution. They could not be considered U.S. citizens, and therefore had no standing to sue in federal court.
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Reporter | March 6, 2007
FREDERICK-- --A bronze plaque identifies the red-brick rowhouse on South Bentz Street in Frederick as once having belonged to Roger Brooke Taney and his wife, Anne. Plain and simple. The larger, more-detailed wooden sign that used to hang out front has been banished to the attic; the sign that made note of the slave quarters in the backyard and the fact that Taney served as chief justice of the United States from 1836 to 1864, during which time he "delivered the opinion in the Dred Scott case."
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2003
FREDERICK -- Nowhere is Maryland's ambivalence toward Roger Brooke Taney more evident than in this city, his adopted home. Taney, the second- longest-serving chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, had a house here that now bears a plaque proclaiming it "a national shrine." But Taney (pronounced TAW-nee) is best known for writing the 1857 Dred Scott decision holding that black Americans were not citizens, so "there's a lot of animosity about the house," says Dick Wettrich, who lives next door.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,SUN REPORTER | July 17, 2007
FREDERICK -- A bronze bust of Roger Brooke Taney stares sternly ahead, as if he were watching the two cherubs frolicking in the fountain in front of City Hall. Author of the inflammatory Dred Scott decision affirming slavery, Taney has been immortalized here for 75 years, largely ignored by passers-by. But as Frederick has grown and become more diverse, a small band of residents is looking to move, or remove, this tribute to the Supreme Court chief justice who once resided in the city, saying his racism can no longer be condoned - even in the context of history.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | March 18, 1993
HAPPY BIRTHDAY Roger Brooke Taney. The most successful politician in Maryland's history was born 216 years ago yesterday.All anyone remembers him for today is that he wrote the decision in the infamous Dred Scott case. Blacks in particular hate him. Early this month Prince George's County blacks got the Roger B. Taney Middle School in Camp Springs renamed. There is a move to pull down -- Lenin-style -- statues of him in Annapolis and Baltimore.Taney was born in Calvert County, settled in Frederick, later in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | December 16, 2000
SO, IN THE END, it all comes down to victimhood. That's the message America's black leadership and their white liberal allies give to the nation: The biggest story of the 2000 presidential election is that black folks, once again, were victims. There you have the Revvum Jesse Jackson and NAACP President Kweisi Mfume alleging that the state of Florida systematically intimidated and disenfranchised black voters. Others, who clearly have allowed Al Gore's election loss to discombobulate certain reasoning areas of their brains, rail against the U.S. Supreme Court decision that declared any further attempt to recount Florida's vote unconstitutional.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | July 22, 2007
In the eyes of the Constitution's framers, black people had "no rights which the white man was bound to respect." The words are from the U.S. Supreme Court's Dred Scott decision, written in 1857 by Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney, a Marylander. Taney did not say he shared this view. But there is evidence in personal letters and legal writing that he did. He was, moreover, a leading member of the American Colonization Society, an organization committed to shipping free blacks back to Africa.
NEWS
July 21, 2007
FREDERICK -- Frederick's Board of Aldermen will consider removing from City Hall a bronze bust of Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney, author of the 1857 Dred Scott decision affirming slavery. The statue of Taney, who lived about 20 years in Frederick, "does not belong in front of the city center," Democratic Alderwoman Donna Kuzemchak said Thursday. Four of the five aldermen agreed to start the discussion by asking the city staff to investigate the possible removal of the bust from the spot it has occupied in front of City Hall for 75 years.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Jennifer Skalka,SUN REPORTER | July 17, 2007
FREDERICK -- A bronze bust of Roger Brooke Taney stares sternly ahead, as if he were watching the two cherubs frolicking in the fountain in front of City Hall. Author of the inflammatory Dred Scott decision affirming slavery, Taney has been immortalized here for 75 years, largely ignored by passers-by. But as Frederick has grown and become more diverse, a small band of residents is looking to move, or remove, this tribute to the Supreme Court chief justice who once resided in the city, saying his racism can no longer be condoned - even in the context of history.
FEATURES
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Reporter | March 6, 2007
FREDERICK-- --A bronze plaque identifies the red-brick rowhouse on South Bentz Street in Frederick as once having belonged to Roger Brooke Taney and his wife, Anne. Plain and simple. The larger, more-detailed wooden sign that used to hang out front has been banished to the attic; the sign that made note of the slave quarters in the backyard and the fact that Taney served as chief justice of the United States from 1836 to 1864, during which time he "delivered the opinion in the Dred Scott case."
NEWS
By Gregory J. Wallance | March 6, 2007
Today is the 150th anniversary of the Supreme Court's infamous 1857 decision in Dred Scott v. Sandford, which paved the way for the Civil War. One elite New York City high school is requiring its advanced American history students to read the multiple opinions written by the Dred Scott justices. If there is a better way to keep students from learning what happened in the Dred Scott case, I can't think of one. The ruling is an incomprehensible mess, a hodgepodge of pro-slave-state racist sentiment dressed up as legal opinion.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Johnathon E. Briggs,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2004
FREDERICK -- Moments after stepping over the threshold of the two-story red-brick house on South Bentz Street yesterday, Chief Justice of the United States William H. Rehnquist said it was his "great pleasure" to stand in the structure once owned by his 19th-century predecessor, Roger Brooke Taney. But the unassuming building named after Taney, who wrote the 1857 Dred Scott decision declaring that black Americans were property, has not always been so warmly regarded. The house -- deemed "a national shrine" in 1930 -- has been viewed with ambivalence by visitors who couldn't help but notice the quarters out back, which once housed some of Taney's eight slaves.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | January 20, 2000
HERE IN civilized Maryland, we do not fly the flag of the Confederacy over our State House. We look with disdain upon those South Carolina rednecks who fight the Civil War 135 years after its alleged conclusion. Outside our State House here in civilized Annapolis, instead of a flag that symbolizes enslavement of human beings, we display a marvelous statue to honor one man. His name was Roger B. Taney. He was chief justice of the United States. OK, so he did help spark the Civil War. In South Carolina, those thousands of people who gathered this week to protest the Confederate flag flying over the statehouse in Columbia have now made their way home.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | July 22, 2007
In the eyes of the Constitution's framers, black people had "no rights which the white man was bound to respect." The words are from the U.S. Supreme Court's Dred Scott decision, written in 1857 by Chief Justice Roger Brooke Taney, a Marylander. Taney did not say he shared this view. But there is evidence in personal letters and legal writing that he did. He was, moreover, a leading member of the American Colonization Society, an organization committed to shipping free blacks back to Africa.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | November 6, 2003
FREDERICK -- Nowhere is Maryland's ambivalence toward Roger Brooke Taney more evident than in this city, his adopted home. Taney, the second- longest-serving chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, had a house here that now bears a plaque proclaiming it "a national shrine." But Taney (pronounced TAW-nee) is best known for writing the 1857 Dred Scott decision holding that black Americans were not citizens, so "there's a lot of animosity about the house," says Dick Wettrich, who lives next door.
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