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Dream Speech

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NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal | January 16, 2012
On this national holiday, it's a great time to listen again (or for the first time) to Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech, which he delivered to a huge crowd of supporters in Washington in 1963. The short speech, only about 16 minutes, seems almost quaint at some points, as King talks of "the Negro" and mixes in Old Testament references. But you also get a feel for his powerful oratory -- the repetitive phrases that build upon each other, gaining strength each time.
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NEWS
September 4, 2013
As we celebrate the 50 t h anniversary of Martin Luther King's "I have a dream" speech, it becomes ever more obvious that years of big government attempts to mandate racial equality have failed ( "Anniversary March on Washington shows Dr. King's 'dream' remains unfulfilled," Aug. 28). In his speech, King was driven by his morality and his service to a divine cause. He dreamed of a future in which all God's children were equal, and of a time where white, black, yellow, brown and red would have a dignity not based upon the color of their skin, but upon the goodness and purity of their divinely formed character.
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NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 20, 1999
BOSTON -- At first it sounds like a question for a panel of philosophers: Who owns a dream? What happens when a vision that's formed in the words of one person is released like a balloon into the air to be shared with everyone? Whose property is it then?The dream in this case was described by Martin Luther King Jr. Standing before a crowd of 200,000 at the Lincoln Memorial on that August day in 1963, he found the language to match the moment. "I Have a Dream," he told the country in a speech that became a part of our collective eloquence, as much a part of our heritage as the Gettysburg Address.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | September 1, 2013
A striking contrast between the 1963 March on Washington and Wednesday's 50th anniversary celebration of it (and of Martin Luther King's historic "I have a dream" speech) was the visible unity and nonpartisanship of the first and the scarcity of both in the second. In the voices the other day of three Democratic presidents -- Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and Barack Obama -- and of not a single prominent Republican leader, past or present, the program seemed at times more a self-congratulatory Democratic rally.
NEWS
January 17, 2011
Here, reprinted in full, are The Sun editorials following Dr. Martin Luther King's speech at the 1963 rally in Washington. Rally in the Capital Thursday Aug. 29, 1963 The atmosphere of yesterday's mass civil rights rally in Washington was one of orderliness, but it was an orderliness under laid with fervor and determination. If anyone had previously doubted that the nation has come to the time when it has to live up to its moral, philosophical and political professions, the doubt can linger no more.
NEWS
January 16, 1993
The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. gave his "I Have a Dream" speech in 1963, not 1968 as stated in a Page 1A cutline in The Evening Sun yesterday.The Baltimore Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Luke Tracy and Luke Tracy,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2003
Anne Arundel County residents will mark the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday with two events in the next week, including a dinner Monday at which a daughter of the slain civil rights leader will speak. Ayinde Jean-Baptiste, who gained notice at age 12 for a speech he gave at the Million Man March in 1995, will be the keynote speaker at today's 15th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Awards Dinner in Linthicum. Today is King's birthday. On Monday, the federal holiday marking King's birthday, Yolanda King will address the 22nd Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Breakfast at Anne Arundel County Community College in Arnold.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 7, 1999
ATLANTA -- Reversing a lower court's decision, a federal appellate court has revived a lawsuit by heirs of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. who claim CBS violated copyright laws by broadcasting portions of his "I Have a Dream" speech without permission.In July 1998, a federal judge here ruled that King's famous 1963 speech, delivered on the Mall in Washington before about 200,000 people and a throng of reporters, was, in essence, public property. U.S. District Judge William O'Kelley dismissed the King estate's case in response to CBS' request for summary judgment.
NEWS
By Elmer P. Martin and Joanne M. Martin | January 15, 1998
AS we mark Martin Luther King Jr.'s birthday today, and through the federal holiday Monday, the nation once again will be bombarded with repeated broadcasts of his ''I Have a Dream'' speech, which he delivered Aug. 28, 1963, during the famous March on Washington.But the replaying of that speech to the exclusion of others, in effect, freezes King at that historical moment, making him into what distinguished black historian Vincent Harding calls a ''harmless icon,'' a ''convenient hero'' tailored to fit the comfort zone of mainstream America.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | January 19, 1994
Speakers at Martin Luther King Jr. celebrations like to remind listeners that the slain civil rights leader's legacy belongs to all Americans.But Dr. King's heirs have increasingly issued another reminder: In a legal sense at least, that legacy belongs to them.Consider:* After USA Today published the full text of Dr. King's 1963 "I Have a Dream" speech -- oratory that has become part of the fabric of American history -- the King estate sued the newspaper last month for copyright infringement.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | August 23, 2013
Kenneth Collins knew he had a big day in store when he showed up for work Aug. 28, 1963. As an officer with the Metropolitan Police Department in Washington, his job was to protect the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr., who planned a major speech to anchor the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Collins was prepared for violence. "Be on your toes," his sergeant had warned him. But he wasn't prepared to be so moved by King's "I Have a Dream" speech, to be motivated to take a deeper look at race relations in the nation's capital and in his own police force, which had already been integrated.
NEWS
By Dave Rosenthal | January 16, 2012
On this national holiday, it's a great time to listen again (or for the first time) to Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech, which he delivered to a huge crowd of supporters in Washington in 1963. The short speech, only about 16 minutes, seems almost quaint at some points, as King talks of "the Negro" and mixes in Old Testament references. But you also get a feel for his powerful oratory -- the repetitive phrases that build upon each other, gaining strength each time.
NEWS
January 17, 2011
Here, reprinted in full, are The Sun editorials following Dr. Martin Luther King's speech at the 1963 rally in Washington. Rally in the Capital Thursday Aug. 29, 1963 The atmosphere of yesterday's mass civil rights rally in Washington was one of orderliness, but it was an orderliness under laid with fervor and determination. If anyone had previously doubted that the nation has come to the time when it has to live up to its moral, philosophical and political professions, the doubt can linger no more.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,sun reporter | October 3, 2006
The case is closed - if not solved. In her hands, Evangeline Moore weighs the 370-page "Homicide Investigation." The bound notebook feels heavy and right - unlike earlier and lighter investigations into the Christmas 1951 murders of her parents - an NAACP official named Harry T. Moore and his wife, Harriette Moore. Although justice was neither swift nor conclusive, Evangeline Moore says she is satisfied. Finally, she believes, the state of Florida took the cold case seriously. "I feel like a load has been lifted off of my shoulders," says Moore, 76, from her home in New Carrollton.
NEWS
By EARL OFARI HUTCHINSON | January 16, 2006
The scramble to snatch and grab a piece of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s legacy has not diminished a bit in the 20 years since the first King national holiday was celebrated. Ironically, President Ronald Reagan was the first to grab at it. He fought passage of the King holiday bill. After insinuating that Dr. King was a Communist, Mr. Reagan signed the legislation only after Congress passed it overwhelmingly and virtually ensured that it was veto-proof. But then Mr. Reagan reversed gears and apologized to a deeply hurt Coretta Scott King, Dr. King's widow, and effusively praised him as a champion of freedom and democracy.
NEWS
By Donna M. Owens | August 28, 2003
I WASN'T yet born when the original March on Washington drew 250,000 people to the Mall in 1963, seeking jobs and racial equality. But like so many African-Americans, I grew up with a special appreciation of this seminal event, grasped early on its historic gravity for our nation, and the world. So on Saturday, I hopped a train to Washington for the 40th anniversary of the march. It's hard to describe my mood that day, my exact feelings, only that an inexplicable stirring in my soul drew me. I knew I had to be there.
NEWS
By Shannon D. Murray and Shannon D. Murray,Staff Writer | January 8, 1993
Two hundred of the city's fifth-grade students used the power of the pen, paint and magic markers to illustrate their depictions of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s dream of racial unity.The 12 winning students -- a racially and ethnically mixed group of African-Americans, an Indian and whites, one a Bulgarian -- presented their posters and read their essays yesterday at the 10th Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Poster and Essay Awards Ceremony at Harford Heights Elementary School.Third-place poster winner James Hicks, of Harford Heights Elementary, used paint and magic markers to recapture Dr. King standing in front of the Lincoln Memorial giving his 1963 "I Have a Dream" speech.
NEWS
January 20, 2002
Making King's dream a reality Each year on the third Monday in January, we celebrate the birth and the dream of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. He was a minister, author, leader and family man who organized peaceful demonstrations against racism during the civil rights movement of the mid-20th century, earning him the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964. Throughout his life, King taught the values of responsibility, tolerance, respect, nonviolence and courage. On the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, Aug. 28, 1963, he delivered his famous "I Have a Dream" speech, in which he told of the dreams he had for his people and for the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 24, 2003
Forty years ago next Thursday, Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his most famous speech. It has been called the best speech of the 20th century. I covered it as the Washington correspondent for his hometown newspaper, the Atlanta Constitution. I wrote a 32-paragraph story which was largely focused on the details of the march itself and the full cast of speakers. I quoted only two sentences of King's remarks; neither was from that now-immortal litany of hopes that gave his remarks a name: "The I-Have-a-Dream Speech."
NEWS
By Clarence Page | August 22, 2003
WASHINGTON - We are more than halfway into ABC News anchor Peter Jennings' excellent documentary on the Rev. Martin Luther King's 1963 "I Have a Dream" speech when we hear comedian-activist Dick Gregory get to the real reason why millions of people watched Dr. King's address on television. Many feared there was going to be "trouble." "And why did white folks look at it?" he says. "Not because they wanted to hear what niggas had to say. They thought it was going to be a bloodbath. They thought it was going to be violence and so they listened all the way to the end."
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