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Dream Job

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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2011
This week, we asked about your dream professions in the city. Here's what you had to say. ••••  Orioles team therapist.  --L inard Gibson  via Facebook ••••  Business owner. Either helping others or baking. Maybe both.  -- hamptongirl  via Twitter ••••  Crabcake taste-tester.  --K elly Mitchell  via Facebook ••••  Owning a design studio.  -- rastheboho  via Twitter ••••  Fully legal weed farmer!
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
The longtime head of the Mayor's Office of Employment Development plans to retire in January. Karen Sitnick, 64, who has worked for the city for more than 30 years, was appointed director of the $24.9 million, 191-person agency in 2000. During her tenure, the department worked with the city school system and the Johns Hopkins University to establish schools with a focus on careers and equipping students with work experience. She launched Baltimore's Youth Opportunity program in 2000, focused on connecting at-risk youth with a suite of services, from academic support and job training to health care.
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NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | November 4, 1994
To Robert Sisselberger, working at a police station is a dream job -- so much so that he spends three days a week at the one in Pasadena as a volunteer maintenance worker.The 25-year-old Pasadena resident, who has Down syndrome, has been volunteering at the station since 1992, doing odd jobs, such as cleaning the community room and sweeping the halls and front stairs.An occasional game of peek-a-boo is part of the fun Mr. Sisselberger brings to the job. "Robert can hide behind a broom whether you know it or not," said his supervisor, Vanessa Turner, the Eastern District station custodian.
NEWS
Alisha George | May 28, 2014
Theresa and Thomas Crouse always knew their son Joseph was self-motivated and determined. The Taneytown residents weren't surprised when he started taking Advanced Placement exams and online college courses while still in high school. Before they knew it, Joseph Crouse had earned his Associate of Arts from Carroll Community College and a Bachelor of Science from Charter Oak State College before graduating from Francis Scott Key High School in 2011. He was also on his way to earning two master's degrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
If you run into Walt Wagner, don't be surprised if he tells you right away, that his son — HIS SON!! — is one of two guys Major League Baseball is paying — PAYING!! — to hole up and watch every last inning of every last ball game. His boy, born in Baltimore and raised on the Orioles, beat out 10,000 people for the chance to "eat, sleep and live baseball" for the entire season — albeit behind glass in a Manhattan storefront. "I still get the shakes when I talk about it," gushes Wagner, a retired city cop. "That's my son. " Ryan Wagner, who's 25, is spending the next seven months with fellow winner Mike O'Hara, lazing on a sofa, sipping Budweisers and fixing his attention on what will turn out to be 2,430 games — a head-spinning number of pitches, countless fly balls, who knows how many stolen bases.
NEWS
By TaNoah V. Sterling and TaNoah V. Sterling,Sun Staff Writer | November 4, 1994
If Robert Sisselberger quit his job at the Eastern District police station, he'd take the fun with him."We wouldn't have anyone to play peek-a-boo with," said Vanessa Turner, a custodian at the station. She supervises Mr. Sisselberger when he comes in three times a week.The 25-year-old Pasadena resident has been volunteering at the station since 1992, cleaning the community room, sweeping the halls and front stairs, bringing a smile to everyone as he dances and sings with his broom, plays peek-a-boo behind corners.
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART | July 11, 2004
CAREER-OBSESSED Americans have a new must-do: the vacation to try on their next job for size. Sensing that the next crop of retirees won't be content with the golf course, entrepreneur Brian Kurth has launched a travel service, VocationVacations, that lets clients test-drive new careers. So far, Kurth has put together packages that put clients into horse training, brewery and winery operations and wedding-event planning. Others offer insights into cheesemaking, broadcasting and running a bed and breakfast.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | June 20, 1992
PEBBLE BEACH, Calif. -- It sounds like a dream job for a typical weekend hacker: Spend eight months at one of the prettiest spots in the country, improve your game at one of the world's best courses and oversee everything but the golf at the U.S. Open.For Frank Bussey, a transplanted Baltimorean, being director of operations for the 92nd Open has been both a grand assignment and a terrific grind. It's a great thing to have on the resume, but it takes a toll on his wife, Cynthia, and their 11-year-old son, Evan, back in Towson.
NEWS
By Deborah Stoudt and Deborah Stoudt,Special to the Sun | May 7, 2000
Just because you're in your early 50s or mid-60s and you can retire doesn't mean you're ready to mothball your work clothes and sprint off to Florida. OK, it sounds good. But how long until you'd be bored? Instead, you choose to lasso your dream job, one that's fun, satisfying and meaningful. That's what's happening across the country. Many would-be retirees are returning to school, getting retrained and launching second careers. They're swapping fancy offices and executive desks for construction sites and tool belts, opening a bed and breakfast or teaching.
FEATURES
By Joanne E. Morvay and Joanne E. Morvay,Special to the sun | October 18, 1998
On a recent evening at Brian Phebus' cozy Reisterstown condominium, the scene was typical family chaos. Brian's sons, Andrew, 9, and Matthew, 6, were alternately playing a noisy video game, wrestling playfully and making trips to the kitchen for snacks .Brian's fiancee, Colleen Maguire, was being pulled in various directions by the multiple projects she always seems to have going all at once. As a Baltimore-based merchandiser for the Greg Norman Collection - a line of golf sportswear that is a division of Reebok - Colleen often has pressing business matters.
SPORTS
By Lance Storm and Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2013
Jimmy Korderas is a friend of mine, so I wanted to unequivocally love “The Three Count.” But unfortunately, in the end I'm left more with mixed emotions. My problem with the book, if you can call it that, is one of perspective. There are two parts to the book in my opinion: the first I enjoyed and found quite fascinating, and the other part just wasn't for me. The part of the book that I loved was the “getting there” portion of his story.  Jimmy's journey from fan to WWE referee is a remarkable tale, one I doubt will ever be duplicated.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2012
Annapolis Alderman Mathew Silverman resigned Friday, citing time conflicts with his job as a special agent at the U.S. Department of Justice, according to city officials. Silverman, a Democrat, was elected to the City Council in 2009 while he was an Anne Arundel County police officer. He subsequently took what he has called "a dream job" with the justice department. In a Friday letter to his council colleagues and Mayor Joshua Cohen, Silverman, 33, wrote that new job responsibilities require him to be on call 24 hours a day and may conflict with his city work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
After five years as Baltimore's police commissioner - five years of sleepless nights, crime scenes and news conferences - Frederick H. Bealefeld III was ready to unplug. While Bealefeld scheduled Aug. 1 as his official retirement date, he's spending most of this month burning off vacation by hiking a 300-odd-mile stretch of the Appalachian Trail - solo and almost completely out of pocket. "I really want to be alone," Bealefeld said. "A lot of people want to come with me, but I don't want to have to talk to anyone.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
It's a little chillier than the Opening Days I grew used to down in Florida. I never had to wear a coat at Tropicana Field. But it's great to be back home. This is my first Opening Day as the Orioles beat writer for the Baltimore Sun. Ever since I stepped into my first newspaper class my sophomore year at Howard High School in Ellicott City, this was the job I always dreamed of having. And after 47 days of Sarasota sunshine -- and hopefully you enjoyed our spring training coverage -- I'm back in Baltimore.
NEWS
April 4, 2012
Ryan Wagner is living proof that your dream job is out there, and it can be yours with hard work and perseverance. The 26-year-old Baltimore native and lifelong Orioles fan was recently hired as Camden Yard's new public address announcer, and cannot be more thrilled about kicking off the new season this Friday. "Baseball has been a love of mine for as long as I can remember. " He said. "My family are all Orioles fans, and my fandom was instilled in me at a very young age. I grew up a short distance from Memorial Stadium and spent every summer of my life either playing, watching, or following the game.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Vivienne Machi | April 4, 2012
Ryan Wagner is living proof that your dream job is out there. The 26-year-old Baltimore native and lifelong Orioles fan was recently hired as Camden Yard's public address announcer, and cannot be more thrilled about kicking off the new season Friday. "Baseball has been a love of mine for as long as I can remember," he said. "My family are all Orioles fans, and my fandom was instilled in me at a very young age. " This isn't the first dream job he's landed, either, having been one of two lucky guys to actually get paid by MLB to watch every game of the 2011 season, interact with the players, and blog, tweet and post videos about them, in the Fan Cave in New York City.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
The longtime head of the Mayor's Office of Employment Development plans to retire in January. Karen Sitnick, 64, who has worked for the city for more than 30 years, was appointed director of the $24.9 million, 191-person agency in 2000. During her tenure, the department worked with the city school system and the Johns Hopkins University to establish schools with a focus on careers and equipping students with work experience. She launched Baltimore's Youth Opportunity program in 2000, focused on connecting at-risk youth with a suite of services, from academic support and job training to health care.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2011
This week, we asked where you like to grab your grub when you're drunk. Here's what you had to say. •••• Sip & Bite. No tolerance for rude behavior -- deepdimples via Twitter •••• Pizza Boli's. But only when you're drunk. --J ayJay Lessard via Facebook •••• Stuggy's in Fells -- discosaturday  via Twitter •••• Maria D's in Fed Hill and Never on Sunday [in]
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2011
This week, we asked where you like to grab your grub when you're drunk. Here's what you had to say. •••• Sip & Bite. No tolerance for rude behavior -- deepdimples via Twitter •••• Pizza Boli's. But only when you're drunk. --J ayJay Lessard via Facebook •••• Stuggy's in Fells -- discosaturday  via Twitter •••• Maria D's in Fed Hill and Never on Sunday [in]
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2011
This week, we asked about your dream professions in the city. Here's what you had to say. ••••  Orioles team therapist.  --L inard Gibson  via Facebook ••••  Business owner. Either helping others or baking. Maybe both.  -- hamptongirl  via Twitter ••••  Crabcake taste-tester.  --K elly Mitchell  via Facebook ••••  Owning a design studio.  -- rastheboho  via Twitter ••••  Fully legal weed farmer!
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