Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDream House
IN THE NEWS

Dream House

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
October 3, 1993
Have you found your dream house? Is it a restored home in Ellicott City or a farmhouse on 40 acres near Westminster? A one-bedroom rowhouse in the city or a two-bedroom Cape Cod near Lutherville with a first-floor bedroom for your mother? Is it custom-built or a tract model? Or have you put on an addition that lets your father live with you? Added a basement that gives enough room so your kids can play without driving you crazy?In other words, have you created or found the home that nearly perfectly fits your lifestyle?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
A group of young people banded together more than a decade ago to overcome public opinion, personal doubt and bureaucracy and build a safe space where Baltimore's youths could thrive and be recognized as productive members of the community. But the Youth Dreamers recently realized they couldn't overcome their biggest hurdle: reality. The Dreamers started as a small, elective middle-school class and became one of the most successful youth-run organizations in the city, drawing national attention.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | July 8, 2006
What makes a dream home? A South Beach villa? Stick-style Victorian? The one Barbie had? Images of fantasy mansions may come to mind, but for 25- to 40-year-olds, the amenities that a house offers can make it a dream home. A recent study conducted by GFK Roper, a global research organization, found that for post-boomer generations, the ideal home is a reflection of values and aspirations. For Generation X, the group of people born between 1965 and 1977, and their younger counterparts born after 1978 - often called Generation Y or echo boomers - a dream house isn't always extra acreage or a cul-de-sac.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2013
The existence of eastern Baltimore County's waterfront neighborhoods, dotted with an ever-growing number of summer cottages and year-round homes, came as a surprise to Frank and Nancy Lanzi. Neither of them even knew about the narrow Wilson Point peninsula jutting out into the Middle River. Now, almost 10 years after that introduction, the couple enjoys life on the river in their new custom-built bungalow, unable to imagine life anywhere else. "We call our house an unexpected blessing because we actually were not looking for a dream house," said Nancy Lanzi, a 56-year-old mother of three grown children and a middle school math teacher.
NEWS
By Audrey Haar and Audrey Haar,Staff Writer | October 10, 1993
Ocean Pines and the Route 611 corridor in West Ocean City are prime areas for individual new homes, whether a custom-built dream house or a 400-square-footer that comes from the manufacturer fully furnished.Charlie Muskat had been looking for a 10-acre wooded site on which to build several years ago, but he settled on a 4 1/2 -acre lot in a new West Ocean City development. He'd wanted to be near the water, but not on the beach."I have sand in my shoes, but I don't like the beach," he says.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | September 6, 1992
HAMPSTEAD -- Rina Vaishnav put her dream house into words and won a $100 savings bond.The 12-year-old may wait years before her prize earns enough interest to pay for her dream. The price of her home will skyrocket as she adds amenities like dual stairways with golden handrails and a pet bedroom."I really doubt if I would ever get something that big with all those things," she said. "But I would really like to."Her essay took first place in the children's category in O'Conor, Piper & Flynn's "We Deliver the American Dream" contest.
BUSINESS
By Carol Nuckols and Carol Nuckols,Fort Worth Star-Telegram | April 12, 1992
SPRINGTOWN, Texas -- It all started in the imagination.Joe and Heather Coomer's three-story Queen Anne-style Victorian in Parker County began as only an idea, a thought. Indeed, they call it their dream house.Now it is solid, three-dimensional reality, if not quite finished.Sometimes dreams do come true.Joe, author of "The Decatur Road," "Kentucky Love" and "A Flatland Fable," and his wife, Heather, a dance student at Texas Christian University, dreamed their new dwelling even before they married in 1986.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1995
Once every week or so, Christopher Gay drives to the end of Ridermark Row in the Hobbit's Glen neighborhood of Columbia to look at the dream house that his late father, popular TV announcer Al Sanders, designed and built but never lived in."That house is a big symbol of my father, just one of the little things that went with my father," Mr. Gay, 19, says. "That house is very significant to my family."Mr. Sanders used to say that the 7,000-square-foot house overlooking the Hobbit's Glen golf course was his wife Ruth's dream house, Mr. Gay recalls, "but he really loved it. He took pictures every week.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2013
A group of young people banded together more than a decade ago to overcome public opinion, personal doubt and bureaucracy and build a safe space where Baltimore's youths could thrive and be recognized as productive members of the community. But the Youth Dreamers recently realized they couldn't overcome their biggest hurdle: reality. The Dreamers started as a small, elective middle-school class and became one of the most successful youth-run organizations in the city, drawing national attention.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 15, 1999
DRIVE ALONG the shores of Wilde Lake, down Hyla Brook Road, until you come to a stone house. Standing at the corner of Pasture Gate Lane, the former 1830s blacksmith shop is the dream home of owners Bruno and Melinda Reich.It was also a dream house for the producers of "Dream House," a program on Home and Garden Television (HGTV), a cable network devoted to home enthusiasts.The house was featured in two half-hour programs on HGTV this month. The programs, filmed about once a week for two years, followed the final stage of the Reichs' remodeling project.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | November 17, 2011
Jessica Lea Mayfield has packed a lot of living into her 22 years. Though the sprightly singer/songwriter may only be a year past the legal drinking age, she's already released two albums and had one notable collaboration. As a child, Mayfield toured and played music with One Way Rider, her family's bluegrass band. Her first record, 2008's "With Blasphemy So Heartfelt," got critics buzzing — in part because Mayfield teamed up with Dan Auerbach, guitarist and singer for the Grammy-winning rock duo The Black Keys.
BUSINESS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2010
A street lined with villa homes in the Harford County community of Bulle Rock appears unremarkable, with exteriors that at a glance appear pretty much alike. It is only upon closer look that Bulle Rock residents' personalities shine through gardens, flags and lawn adornments. At Valerie Matricciani's villa home, the front yard is a botanical feast for the senses and, visitors soon realize, a mere taste of what's to come beyond the door. The walk leading to her home is lined with dwarf bushes, impatiens, large coleus plants and a gracefully blooming crepe myrtle.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2010
On a back wall of the brightest house on Carswell Street hangs a piece of paper, protected in plastic to keep it from crumbling. It's a promise, impetuously made nearly a decade ago by sixth graders who lived nearby. They were going to open an after-school center. They each scribbled their name in marker, to seal the deal. No one thought they'd ever really do it. Not even their teacher, who helped them draft the pledge. Yet the kids and their teacher from a rough part of town incorporated, raised more than a half-million dollars, fought government bureaucracy, changed a neighborhood's mind about inner city kids and turned a derelict eyesore into something beautiful.
FEATURES
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2008
With 5,800 square feet of intricately carved plaster moldings, sweeping archways and parquet oak flooring, it's hard to digest the beauty of Tom Hall's home all at once. So Hall, the music director of the Baltimore Choral Arts Society, wife Linell Smith, a former reporter for The Baltimore Sun and 19-year-old daughter Miranda enjoy their 13-room, circa 1895, Italianate-style home in historic Reservoir Hill one room at a time. "There's no favorite room," says 53-year-old Hall. "It depends on where we are at the moment."
FEATURES
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,Special to the Sun | August 2, 2008
From a winding road in Howard County's small town of Fulton, it's not easy to spot the home of Dr. Francisco Ward and his wife, Nadia. That is just as they would have it. Three years ago, it was not so much about privacy, as it was - and still is - about space. Their rambling ranch house, complete with horse barn and a few outbuildings, sits on 6 acres of land at the end of a long driveway. It is, they contend, the ideal place for raising their five children. "It was getting pretty crowded in our Ellicott City house," said 42-year old Nadia Ward, who does administrative work for her husband's pain management practice in Baltimore.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | July 13, 2008
When Marian Matthis first saw the center-hall colonial brick house in West Towson some four years ago, she was seduced by its charm, large rooms and yard. "This was my dream home," she said. It had decorative moldings, enough space for four children, an eat-in kitchen, balconies, shady gardens and sunny gardens. "I get more use out of the patio and porch and the pond area," she said.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | April 4, 2007
There's a funny premise at the core of Are We Done Yet? Too bad the movie doesn't do much with it. A remake of the 1948 Cary Grant comedy Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, the film stars Ice Cube as Nick Persons, a newlywed father of two and would-be magazine publisher who moves his family to a big fixer-upper house in the country. The plot gets them away from the dangers of the city and gives everyone space to breathe, but gives short shrift to all manner of comic possibilities. Are We Done Yet?
FEATURES
By Ann Egerton and Ann Egerton,Contributing Writer | April 19, 1993
I suppose that there are currently scores of young girls sitting at their parents' word processors and writing ferociously about their neglected childhoods as latchkey children. For now, we have "Dream House: A Memoir," in which poet/editor Charlotte Nekola recounts her youth during the '50s in St. Louis.She tells of her mother's cooking and baking and keeping house and taking care of her and the two older children. Mother's sin, although she did her housewife's duties every day, was that she didn't seem to like it very much and was often absent-minded and remote.
BUSINESS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,sun reporter | December 9, 2007
The lights shone on them as the moment of truth was being taped: How much might their Reservoir Hill home fetch? "Hopefully, $440,000," homeowner Phil Adams guessed tentatively. "We'd really like to pull out some equity to redo the kitchen," said his partner, Gary Norris. Pause. "Are you sure you want to know the number?" the real estate agent asked, and the heads nodded. "If I were to list this house today, I would list it at $425,000." The homeowners' response: "Ouch." Time for a do-over.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | April 4, 2007
There's a funny premise at the core of Are We Done Yet? Too bad the movie doesn't do much with it. A remake of the 1948 Cary Grant comedy Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House, the film stars Ice Cube as Nick Persons, a newlywed father of two and would-be magazine publisher who moves his family to a big fixer-upper house in the country. The plot gets them away from the dangers of the city and gives everyone space to breathe, but gives short shrift to all manner of comic possibilities. Are We Done Yet?
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.