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NEWS
August 26, 2013
They came and they came and they came. Streaming down 17th Street toward the Lincoln Memorial, about 100,000 of us, black, brown and light-skinned, some speaking languages other than English, they came together to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s March on Washington. The young, holding onto the hands of the wise, were there in force, the future learning from the past ("Obama in gray area as he commemorates march," Aug. 26). Many of us were outraged and our signs witnessed those grievances - justice, merciful immigration laws, more jobs, better wages, fair development, peace in our cities, better schools for our kids, treatment and rehabilitation for prisoners.
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FEATURES
By Christianna McCausland and For The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
When Ward Westrick retired from commercial real estate development, he and wife Ginny were happy to sell their home in McLean and leave the density of Northern Virginia behind to settle on the Chesapeake Bay's calmer shores. While Ward may have made a living in development, he and Ginny did not want to build a home. However, after looking at as many as 50 houses from Gibson Island to Mayo and finding nothing but disappointment, they snapped up a 2.25 acre parcel on the South River in Annapolis (before it was even listed)
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NEWS
January 19, 2010
It is laudable that children remembered Rev. Luther Martin Luther King Jr. at Port Discovery with crafts, quilting squares and music ("Artful Tribute to King," Jan. 18). Other than that, not much was said about Mr. King, possibly due to the fact that we have an articulate, attractive African-American as president of the United States. Mr. King's goals and aspirations may seem irrelevant and outdated, but while some issues, such as public accommodations, have seen vast improvement, there are other areas championed by Mr. King that have seen little change -- economic justice and an end to poverty, universal health care, the beginning of the end of the deadly arms race, as well as the on-going maiming and killing in Iraq and Afghanistan.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2014
Continuing to emerge as a major entertainment presence in Annapolis, Compass Rose Theater has opened its fourth season with Lorraine Hansberry's powerful 1959 drama, "A Raisin in the Sun," visiting issues of justice and equal opportunity that continue to resonate with audiences today. Groundbreaking 55 years ago as the first Broadway play written by a black female author, "A Raisin in the Sun" not only changed American theater, but offered hope for a future when the dreams of African-American families would no longer be deferred.
SPORTS
Glenn Graham | July 11, 2012
Lauren Gibson has always dreamed big, even when she was sporting an extra-small Lake Shore Lightning softball uniform that drenched her as the 4-year-old batgirl for her older sister's club team. Set to turn 21 next month, the former Chesapeake-AA standout has found a uniform that fits just fine these days, while fulfilling that lifelong dream. In her second year as a member of the USA women's national team, Gibson has become a fixture as its starting second baseman. Team USA will compete in the Women's World Fastpitch Championships set to begin Thursday in Whitehorse, Yukon, Canada.  "To be able to play for my country is just amazing," said Gibson, an All-American at Tennessee who will be a senior this fall.
SPORTS
January 8, 2010
Mark McGwire is returning to baseball as the Cardinals' hitting coach. Could he also be making a cameo as a player? Manager Tony La Russa , in an interview with the Contra Costa Times, mentioned the possibility of putting McGwire on the team's active roster on Aug. 31 so he'd be eligible to play in the postseason, if the Cardinals are in the race. "If we're in contention, we'll put him on the roster. It's a nice little dream," La Russa said. "Is it likely? Probably not. But I don't think it's a zero possibility."
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2011
Some students at Bates Middle School dream of stopping global warming, others of living in expensive houses, and others of being honor roll students. Sheryl Menendez tells them to dream big but reminds them that no dream is too small or too trivial, and then she works with them to make their dreams realities. Menendez is executive director of the Annapolis-based, nonprofit Restoration Community Development Corp., which founded the Gems and Jewels Mentoring Program for Bates students in 1998 and later for Annapolis Middle School.
EXPLORE
December 27, 2012
I read with great interest the article, " Columbia Association to open new fitness club in Rouse Co. building," in the Dec. 20 issue of the Columbia Flier. What was conveniently omitted from the article is the alleged plan to limit membership to upper-end professionals: professionals who prefer working out with others of their vocational/economic stratum. Moreover CA is paying for the addition - $2.4 million - with assessment fees paid by Columbia residents. If upper-end professionals want a separate facility they should pay for it. The planned location, the Rouse Co. building, of this - exclusive - facility adds insult to injury. Jim Rouse's dream for the new city did not include demographic distinctions based on class, economics or vocation.
EXPLORE
By Brianna Patterson | January 16, 2012
The black and white images of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. flashed across the large screen. Inside the Smith Theater at the Howard County Community College, more than 200 spectators of all ages and races moved into their seats in anticipation of the 27th Commemorative Birthday Celebration honoring Dr. King's life. On what would have been his 83rd birthday, citizens and officials from Howard County came together Sunday, Jan. 15, to pay homage to the civil rights leader in a powerful program titled "Renewing the Dream.
SPORTS
By Don Markus | March 16, 2012
PITTSBURGH -- Jimmy Patsos pointed to the white board in his team's dressing room at the Consol Energy Center on Thursday night, the names of the Ohio State players scrawled in red marker, their stats in black. He came to the names of sophomore forwards Jared Sullinger and DeShaun Thomas. "That sucker's good," the Loyola coach said about Sullinger, the National Player of the Year as a freshman. He turned to junior forward Erik Etherly in talking about Thomas. "That guy's really good getting to the offensive glass," Patsos said.
NEWS
By Kaitlin Thomas | September 18, 2014
It sounds great on the surface that there would actually be a place in the world where opportunity and money abound, knowing no imaginable limits. Almost as though a new life, full of the freedoms, finances and prospects, is ripe for the picking from the American Dream tree. Such is the too-good-to-be-true nature of this centuries old image that has charmed foreigners to uproot their lives, families and futures to cross a border into an immense unknown: the glistening USA. But, as they say, all that glitters is not gold - something to keep in mind when considering crossing an arbitrary line in the hopes it could change one's life so radically and, more importantly, effortlessly.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2014
Cordelia D. Oliver, a retired Baltimore public schools educator who was one of the first African-American docents at the Baltimore Museum of Art , died Aug. 4 at Gilchrist Hospice care in Towson of complications from a stroke. She was 92. "Cordelia was a wonderful person, and if anyone met her, they were instantly drawn to her because of her personality," said Camay Calloway Murphy of Baltimore, former executive director of the Eubie Blake Cultural Center and onetime Baltimore school board member.
SPORTS
Mike Preston | August 7, 2014
It is early in the preseason, so it's OK to dream at this point. After an impressive drive on their only series together as starters, the Ravens had something to smile about Thursday night in the preseason opener against the San Francisco 49ers. What if this offensive line can play this well all season? We're not going to get ridiculous here. The Ravens had a 10-play, 80-yard scoring drive that ended with a 2-yard touchdown run by Bernard Pierce on their opening drive. Of course the 49ers had six defensive starters out of the lineup, and their game-day intensity was certainly lacking, but that's not what you look for in preseason game No. 1. On the offensive line, you look for communication and cohesion.
NEWS
By Danae King, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
Since she was 7 years old, Donatila Leticia Munoz Orantes has wanted to become a U.S. citizen. On Wednesday, her 100th birthday, her wish came true. Munoz Orantes, a native Nicaraguan who lives with her daughter in Germantown, came to the United States from El Salvador in the 1980s and never left. "It's a wonderful country," Munoz Orantes, who was joined by family and friends at her naturalization ceremony in Baltimore, said during a recent interview at her daughter's home. Because Munoz Orantes speaks only Spanish, her daughter interpreted for her. Munoz Orantes wasn't able to become a citizen until now because she doesn't speak English, a requirement until a resident reaches a certain age and number of years in the country.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | July 8, 2014
WASHINGTON - This is not the first time that the Orioles and Washington Nationals both have reached midseason with a chance to make the playoffs, but it might be the first time anyone seriously considered the possibility of a "Battle of the Beltways" World Series. Both teams were in contention in 2012. The Nationals were in first place for all but three days of that season, and the Orioles were redistilling the concept of "Oriole Magic" with a collection of strange and wonderful moments that eventually would propel them into the first-ever American League wild-card game.
SPORTS
By Paul Pierre-Louis, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2014
Before BMX rider Jamie Bestwick could hop on his bike and spend time doing what he loves most, he had to go to work. Starting at 16, Bestwick spent 12 years working various jobs to earn his living. He was a ceramic tiler, then worked at a chocolate factory and then at an airplane engine repair company. Back then, BMX was just a hobby - a part-time job, at best - that he couldn't get off his mind. “Every day, I would go to work and I would work this job, but all I would sit there thinking about was riding my bike,” said Bestwick, who will compete today at the Dew Tour Beach Championships in Ocean City.
FEATURES
By Leo Lionni | August 25, 1999
Editor's note: Matthew the mouse lives in a dreary corner of a dusty attic. A trip to the museum helps him look at his surroundings in a new way.A couple of mice lived in a dusty attic with their only child. His name was Matthew. In one corner of the attic, draped with cobwebs, were piles of newspapers, books, and magazines, an old broken lamp, and the sad remains of a doll. That was Matthew's corner.The mice were very poor, but they had high hopes for Matthew. He would grow up to be a doctor, perhaps.
NEWS
By Stephanie Salter | February 8, 1995
CLOSE FRIENDS of Martin Luther King Jr. say Georgia Powers is a liar.Ms. Powers, the first African American to serve in the Kentucky legislature, says she had a year-long love affair with Dr. King. In fact, she says in her biography, King spent his last night with her at the Memphis motel where he was murdered the next day, April 4, 1968."When they put Dr. King into the ambulance, I instinctively began climbing in to go with him," Ms. Powers writes in her recently published book, "I Shared the Dream."
SPORTS
Aaron Dodson, The Baltimore Sun | June 22, 2014
WASHINGTON -- Joel Chiles remembers taking his youngest son, Ian, to a carnival many years ago. Ian was 10 years old, and he wanted to play the basketball game in which you win a prize for a certain amount of made shots. Joel gave Ian three $1 bills to play before he turned to talk to some friends. As time passed, Joel noticed that Ian kept shooting. "I'm thinking to myself, 'I only gave him three dollars,' " Joel Chiles said. "So I went over there to see why he was still shooting, and the guy running the game said he kept letting him shoot because Ian had such a pretty shot.
SPORTS
Sports Digest | June 19, 2014
WNBA McCoughtry, Dream add to Mystics' misery, 83-73 Baltimore's Angel McCoughtry (St. Frances) punished the Mystics for the second game in a row, scoring a game-high 27 points to power the host Atlanta Dream to an 83-73 win. McCoughtry, who also played a game-high 37 minutes, added six rebounds, four assists and three steals. Guard Bria Hartley (16 points) led the Mystics, who shot 47.1 percent from 3-point range but lost that advantage through deficits in turnovers, rebounding and overall field-goal percentage.
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