Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDreadlocks
IN THE NEWS

Dreadlocks

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith has joked about cutting off his dreadlocks before but never  followed through with it. Even getting pulled down to the ground by his hair two seasons ago by Cincinnati Bengals cornerback Adam Jones wasn't enough to convince Smith that he needed to get rid of them. However, Smith apparently has had a change of heart. He joked on his Twitter account earlier today that he was thinking about cutting his "locs. " When asked why, he wrote that he was "getting tired of them.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 6, 2013
I was delighted to read that Cristo Rey Jesuit High School has changed its ban on dreadlocks ("No dread: Private school cuts hair policy," Dec. 2). Our school, Sisters Academy of Baltimore, sends many students to this excellent high school. There, our girls have sharpened their minds, increased their employment potential and paved their paths toward college. It is my understanding that the dreadlocks ban was in place because of the school's internship program, and I can imagine that when Cristo Rey first opened its doors in 2007, there were many businesses that would have been reluctant to include a teenager with dreadlocks on their staffs.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | September 5, 2012
Long, flowing dreadlocks have become a signature look for Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith in Baltimore. On Sunday afternoons, he has seen Ravens fans adorning dreadlocked wigs, the kind you would buy at one of those costume shops that pop up out of nowhere around Halloween. Others wear T-shirts that are replicas of his purple Ravens jersey, with black screen-printed dreadlocks covering up his surname above his number 82. “Around here, people are kind of obsessed,” the second-year wide receiver said Wednesday with a smile.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
When a representative from Cristo Rey Jesuit High School visited Danielle Cook's class, the eighth-grader thought she fit the criteria for the rigorous college preparatory high school in Baltimore. She has been a straight-A student since preschool, is at the top of her class at Afya Public Charter School and participates in a half-dozen extracurricular activities. Then the representative described the school's dress code and its hairstyle restrictions, and Danielle realized something other than academics could keep her from attending: the 75 dreadlocks framing her face.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2000
For Antoine Chambers, dreadlocks are not simply a fashionable hairstyle. Like earlocks for Orthodox Jews, he says, they are a religious must for his spiritual practice, Rastafarianism. That is why Chambers refuses to cut them. And his refusal is why Chambers, a patrolman in the Baltimore Police Department's Northern District since 1994, is now answering nonemergency phone calls rather than policing his beat. Chambers was put on administrative duty June 27 after failing to comply with the department's hair-grooming regulations, which prohibit uniformed officers from adopting styles "which would likely be regarded as excessive or otherwise inappropriate to a uniformed appearance," according to the policy handbook.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
When a representative from Cristo Rey Jesuit High School visited Danielle Cook's class, the eighth-grader thought she fit the criteria for the rigorous college preparatory high school in Baltimore. She has been a straight-A student since preschool, is at the top of her class at Afya Public Charter School and participates in a half-dozen extracurricular activities. Then the representative described the school's dress code and its hairstyle restrictions, and Danielle realized something other than academics could keep her from attending: the 75 dreadlocks framing her face.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Sun Staff Writer | September 9, 1994
BALTIMORE -- Police were seeking a bicyclist wearing dreadlocks in connection with the fatal shooting early todayFriday of a 25-year-old man near his E. 20th Street home.Eastern District police responding to a report of a shooting in the 300 block of E. 20th St. around 2:30 a.m. found the victim, James Nathaniel Horsey, lying on the pavement a short distance from his home.The man had been shot at least once and was transported to John Hopkins Hospital, where he died at 3:12 a.m.Witnesses told police they saw a black man with dreadlocks riding away from the scene on a bike toward Greenmount Avenue.
NEWS
December 6, 2013
I was delighted to read that Cristo Rey Jesuit High School has changed its ban on dreadlocks ("No dread: Private school cuts hair policy," Dec. 2). Our school, Sisters Academy of Baltimore, sends many students to this excellent high school. There, our girls have sharpened their minds, increased their employment potential and paved their paths toward college. It is my understanding that the dreadlocks ban was in place because of the school's internship program, and I can imagine that when Cristo Rey first opened its doors in 2007, there were many businesses that would have been reluctant to include a teenager with dreadlocks on their staffs.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2011
It was an eventful Sunday afternoon for Torrey Smith — and his dreadlocks. The fleet-footed wide receiver set new career highs in catches (six) and receiving yards (165). He established a new Ravens franchise record for rookie receiving yards with 590 in just 10 games. And his 38-yard touchdown catch early in the fourth quarter ended up being the difference as the Ravens held off the pesky Cincinnati Bengals, 31-24, at M&T Bank Stadium. But after the game, the thing that everyone wanted to talk about most was his hair.
NEWS
By Robin Finn and Robin Finn,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 20, 2000
NEW YORK - Corporations beware: If you were born around 1865, Deadria C. Farmer-Paellmann is looking for slaves in your archives and may have bad news for you. The sleuthing started in 1992 when, as artistic director of the protest (a 26-hour "drum vigil") that halted excavation of a 17th-century African burial ground near City Hall, Farmer-Paellmann got insider privileges to crunch a hard hat over her dreadlocks and crash the site. There she stumbled on a scene that changed - and channeled - her life's work.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec and The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2013
Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith has joked about cutting off his dreadlocks before but never  followed through with it. Even getting pulled down to the ground by his hair two seasons ago by Cincinnati Bengals cornerback Adam Jones wasn't enough to convince Smith that he needed to get rid of them. However, Smith apparently has had a change of heart. He joked on his Twitter account earlier today that he was thinking about cutting his "locs. " When asked why, he wrote that he was "getting tired of them.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | September 5, 2012
Long, flowing dreadlocks have become a signature look for Ravens wide receiver Torrey Smith in Baltimore. On Sunday afternoons, he has seen Ravens fans adorning dreadlocked wigs, the kind you would buy at one of those costume shops that pop up out of nowhere around Halloween. Others wear T-shirts that are replicas of his purple Ravens jersey, with black screen-printed dreadlocks covering up his surname above his number 82. “Around here, people are kind of obsessed,” the second-year wide receiver said Wednesday with a smile.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel, The Baltimore Sun | November 20, 2011
It was an eventful Sunday afternoon for Torrey Smith — and his dreadlocks. The fleet-footed wide receiver set new career highs in catches (six) and receiving yards (165). He established a new Ravens franchise record for rookie receiving yards with 590 in just 10 games. And his 38-yard touchdown catch early in the fourth quarter ended up being the difference as the Ravens held off the pesky Cincinnati Bengals, 31-24, at M&T Bank Stadium. But after the game, the thing that everyone wanted to talk about most was his hair.
NEWS
By Robin Finn and Robin Finn,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 20, 2000
NEW YORK - Corporations beware: If you were born around 1865, Deadria C. Farmer-Paellmann is looking for slaves in your archives and may have bad news for you. The sleuthing started in 1992 when, as artistic director of the protest (a 26-hour "drum vigil") that halted excavation of a 17th-century African burial ground near City Hall, Farmer-Paellmann got insider privileges to crunch a hard hat over her dreadlocks and crash the site. There she stumbled on a scene that changed - and channeled - her life's work.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and Sarah Koenig,SUN STAFF | July 12, 2000
For Antoine Chambers, dreadlocks are not simply a fashionable hairstyle. Like earlocks for Orthodox Jews, he says, they are a religious must for his spiritual practice, Rastafarianism. That is why Chambers refuses to cut them. And his refusal is why Chambers, a patrolman in the Baltimore Police Department's Northern District since 1994, is now answering nonemergency phone calls rather than policing his beat. Chambers was put on administrative duty June 27 after failing to comply with the department's hair-grooming regulations, which prohibit uniformed officers from adopting styles "which would likely be regarded as excessive or otherwise inappropriate to a uniformed appearance," according to the policy handbook.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Sun Staff Writer | September 9, 1994
BALTIMORE -- Police were seeking a bicyclist wearing dreadlocks in connection with the fatal shooting early todayFriday of a 25-year-old man near his E. 20th Street home.Eastern District police responding to a report of a shooting in the 300 block of E. 20th St. around 2:30 a.m. found the victim, James Nathaniel Horsey, lying on the pavement a short distance from his home.The man had been shot at least once and was transported to John Hopkins Hospital, where he died at 3:12 a.m.Witnesses told police they saw a black man with dreadlocks riding away from the scene on a bike toward Greenmount Avenue.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | May 17, 1992
Awadagin Pratt stops traffic on Charles Street.He's got the kind of looks that do it -- dressed completely in black, he resembles a matinee idol in dreadlocks -- but that's not the reason cars are braking and people are coming over to throw their arms around him.Last Tuesday, when the 26-year-old Peabody pianist won the prestigious Naumburg Competition in New York, he became the first African-American classical instrumentalist ever to win first prize in...
NEWS
By HUGH PEARSON | February 10, 1991
AT THE AGE of 33, two years into wearing them, I' discovering that dreadlocks are appropriately named. As much as I like them, I'm alternately amused and frustrated by people's reactions to my hair style.Dreadlocks are as ancient as Africa and India. The regal Masai warriors of Kenya sport them. But today dreadlocks are most often identified with the Rastafarians of Jamaica and, by extension, with reggae musicians.There are two ways to "create" dreadlocks. Due to the wool-like texture of most black people's hair, it can simply be twisted and will remain that way even after it is washed.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Sun Fashion Editor | August 4, 1994
We do indeed live in a global village, trading cultural ideas as well as fashionable trinkets quicker than you can spell Benetton.Dreadlocks, the matted hair of Jamaica's Rastafarian believers, are weaving their way into mainstream America. Slowly, to be sure. Rockers jumped on the dread wagon fairly recently -- anything to stand out in MTV's endless trendiness. The young club set is following suit, and before we know it glimmers of Kingston style will start raising eyebrows at the country club.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | May 17, 1992
Awadagin Pratt stops traffic on Charles Street.He's got the kind of looks that do it -- dressed completely in black, he resembles a matinee idol in dreadlocks -- but that's not the reason cars are braking and people are coming over to throw their arms around him.Last Tuesday, when the 26-year-old Peabody pianist won the prestigious Naumburg Competition in New York, he became the first African-American classical instrumentalist ever to win first prize in...
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.