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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
Rapper, producer and actor Dr. Dre knows who he likes in the Super Bowl: Ravens to take it all. He tells TMZ that he's with the team that has Ray Lewis on it. "It's a good looking Super Bowl, isn't it?" a TMZ reporter asks Dr. Dre. "Absolutely," Dr. Dre says. "I'm excited for Ray Lewis, man," he continues. "He's a good guy and I'm a fan of his. I'm wishing the best for him. " Not a bad endorsement from a California guy, who -- at least logistically speaking -- would seem inclined to go with San Francisco.
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By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2013
Rapper, producer and actor Dr. Dre knows who he likes in the Super Bowl: Ravens to take it all. He tells TMZ that he's with the team that has Ray Lewis on it. "It's a good looking Super Bowl, isn't it?" a TMZ reporter asks Dr. Dre. "Absolutely," Dr. Dre says. "I'm excited for Ray Lewis, man," he continues. "He's a good guy and I'm a fan of his. I'm wishing the best for him. " Not a bad endorsement from a California guy, who -- at least logistically speaking -- would seem inclined to go with San Francisco.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
Michael Ian Black facetiously named his stand-up special "Very Famous" — but it's true, depending on whom you ask. Black, the snarky comedian best known for his pop-culture takedowns on VH1, is a cult-hero for his work on MTV's '90s sketch-comedy show "The State," playing McKinley in "Wet Hot American Summer" and as a strange bowling alley manager on the NBC show "Ed. " He's currently headlining his "Black is White" comedy tour (which stops...
NEWS
By Wesley Case and Erik Maza, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2012
Just as winter begins to bum everyone out with its dropping temperatures and dark-by-4:30-p.m. routine, the newly liberated Coachella lineup has us daydreaming of spring and a weekend trip to the west coast. Seemingly every year, Coachella sets the standard for Important Music Festivals, and 2012 is no exception. There's a lot of talking points but here's a quick run-down: Underappreciated and surprisingly influential bands are reuniting (Refused, At the Drive-In), Radiohead will play, David Guetta and the Shins are listed next to each other on the poster (exemplifying the festival's continued steps toward sonic diversity)
NEWS
By DAVE WISCHNOWSKY AND M. DANIEL GIBBARD and DAVE WISCHNOWSKY AND M. DANIEL GIBBARD,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 24, 2006
MILWAUKEE -- Quadrevion "Dre" Henning and Purvis Virginia Parker had spent most of Sunday morning playing outside, but they weren't ready to relax and watch television. So, a few hours before dark, they got permission from home to head for a northwest Milwaukee playground less than two blocks from their homes. Their families haven't seen them since. "It's like the children dissolved," Trevor Henning, Dre's uncle, said yesterday. "They just disappeared." After searching the area with dogs, divers and 150 volunteers for four days, police say they have no idea what happened to Dre, 12, or Purvis, 11. Without anything to go on, police are not calling the disappearance an abduction.
FEATURES
By Wendy Thermos and Wendy Thermos,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 17, 2004
SANTA MONICA, Calif. - A hip-hop music awards ceremony erupted in chaos Monday night after rap pioneer Dr. Dre, awaiting a lifetime achievement award, apparently was punched in the face and his bodyguards set upon the attacker. The second-annual Vibe Awards were halted as police swarmed the hangar at Santa Monica Airport, where about 1,000 people were attending a taping of the show. Santa Monica police summoned reinforcements from neighboring law enforcement agencies. In the chaos, a man was stabbed, police said.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 28, 2000
The "Up in Smoke" tour, featuring Dr. Dre and some of the biggest names in West Coast rap, has been working its way across the country this summer. And despite concerns expressed by some music industry pundits when the tour was announced, gangsta rap onstage hasn't resulted in violence offstage; audiences have peacefully enjoyed the show's flashy production and nonstop string of hits. In short, "Up in Smoke" has been going like a house on fire. What went right? "I think the artists have a responsibility to set the tone," says Xzibit, one of the rappers on the tour.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and By M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2001
The young man is tapping the name on the concrete wall of 2510 E. Biddle St., tapping it insistently, emphatically, as he makes his point. This name, spray-painted here and across the street and around the corner, these words, "1 Love Dre 1975-1999," were not left randomly to disrespect property and community. "Don't disrespect this by calling it graffiti," he says. "This is a piece of my heart right here." His name is Troy, and pieces of his heart are all around East Biddle Street and Milton Avenue: "RIP Dre The good die young.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 10, 2004
The song was fierce, a bizarre banger with an odd Indian vocal sample riding the groove of B.T. Express' "Do It ('Til You're Satisfied)." Truth Hurts' "Addictive," produced by Dr. Dre and DJ Quik with a smoothed-out rap from legendary rhyme spitter Rakim, was one of the biggest crossover hits of 2002. The video, replete with hip-shaking Indian-inspired dance sequences, stayed in frequent rotation on MTV and BET. The joint thumped from countless radio and club speakers and hit No. 1. In the mix of exotic beats and shrill melisma, Truth extolled the man of her dreams: He's so contagious, he turns my pages He's got me anxious, he's what I waited for He keeps me guessin', spon -- tan -- ne -- ous ... After "Addictive" fell off the charts, it looked as if Truth would join Anita Ward ("Ring My Bell")
FEATURES
By Chuck Philips and Chuck Philips,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2003
He's been shot. He's been stabbed. He's been locked up - most recently on New Year's Eve. For rap music fans, that only adds to the allure of 50 Cent. Popular on the club scene for years, the 26-year-old native of Queens, N.Y., is aiming for the big time with the release tomorrow of his first commercial album. Get Rich or Die Tryin' is one of the most anticipated hip-hop albums of the year. "He writes monster songs," said industry veteran Steve Stoute, who has run the black music divisions at several top labels.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2011
Michael Ian Black facetiously named his stand-up special "Very Famous" — but it's true, depending on whom you ask. Black, the snarky comedian best known for his pop-culture takedowns on VH1, is a cult-hero for his work on MTV's '90s sketch-comedy show "The State," playing McKinley in "Wet Hot American Summer" and as a strange bowling alley manager on the NBC show "Ed. " He's currently headlining his "Black is White" comedy tour (which stops...
NEWS
By DAVE WISCHNOWSKY AND M. DANIEL GIBBARD and DAVE WISCHNOWSKY AND M. DANIEL GIBBARD,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | March 24, 2006
MILWAUKEE -- Quadrevion "Dre" Henning and Purvis Virginia Parker had spent most of Sunday morning playing outside, but they weren't ready to relax and watch television. So, a few hours before dark, they got permission from home to head for a northwest Milwaukee playground less than two blocks from their homes. Their families haven't seen them since. "It's like the children dissolved," Trevor Henning, Dre's uncle, said yesterday. "They just disappeared." After searching the area with dogs, divers and 150 volunteers for four days, police say they have no idea what happened to Dre, 12, or Purvis, 11. Without anything to go on, police are not calling the disappearance an abduction.
FEATURES
By Wendy Thermos and Wendy Thermos,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 17, 2004
SANTA MONICA, Calif. - A hip-hop music awards ceremony erupted in chaos Monday night after rap pioneer Dr. Dre, awaiting a lifetime achievement award, apparently was punched in the face and his bodyguards set upon the attacker. The second-annual Vibe Awards were halted as police swarmed the hangar at Santa Monica Airport, where about 1,000 people were attending a taping of the show. Santa Monica police summoned reinforcements from neighboring law enforcement agencies. In the chaos, a man was stabbed, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | June 10, 2004
The song was fierce, a bizarre banger with an odd Indian vocal sample riding the groove of B.T. Express' "Do It ('Til You're Satisfied)." Truth Hurts' "Addictive," produced by Dr. Dre and DJ Quik with a smoothed-out rap from legendary rhyme spitter Rakim, was one of the biggest crossover hits of 2002. The video, replete with hip-shaking Indian-inspired dance sequences, stayed in frequent rotation on MTV and BET. The joint thumped from countless radio and club speakers and hit No. 1. In the mix of exotic beats and shrill melisma, Truth extolled the man of her dreams: He's so contagious, he turns my pages He's got me anxious, he's what I waited for He keeps me guessin', spon -- tan -- ne -- ous ... After "Addictive" fell off the charts, it looked as if Truth would join Anita Ward ("Ring My Bell")
FEATURES
By Chuck Philips and Chuck Philips,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 5, 2003
He's been shot. He's been stabbed. He's been locked up - most recently on New Year's Eve. For rap music fans, that only adds to the allure of 50 Cent. Popular on the club scene for years, the 26-year-old native of Queens, N.Y., is aiming for the big time with the release tomorrow of his first commercial album. Get Rich or Die Tryin' is one of the most anticipated hip-hop albums of the year. "He writes monster songs," said industry veteran Steve Stoute, who has run the black music divisions at several top labels.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and By M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | June 7, 2001
The young man is tapping the name on the concrete wall of 2510 E. Biddle St., tapping it insistently, emphatically, as he makes his point. This name, spray-painted here and across the street and around the corner, these words, "1 Love Dre 1975-1999," were not left randomly to disrespect property and community. "Don't disrespect this by calling it graffiti," he says. "This is a piece of my heart right here." His name is Troy, and pieces of his heart are all around East Biddle Street and Milton Avenue: "RIP Dre The good die young.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1996
For those of you not watching Game 6 of the World Series tonight (did someone tell the real Braves to take the rest of the year off after Game 2?), here are a few suggestions"Dumbo" (2 p.m.-4 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54) -- Classic Disney, this story of the traumatized baby elephant with the huge ears is one of the best. But parents be warned: What happens to Dumbo's mother isn't pretty."Carreras, Domingo, Pavarotti with Levine: The Three Tenors in Concert 1996" (8 p.m.-9: 30 p.m.) -- Those three deep-toned voices are back, performing this time with the help of the Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, under the direction of James Levine.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | April 28, 1994
Dr. Dre and Snoop Doggy Dogg were among the big winners when the Source Awards -- the world's first rap-oriented awards show -- were handed out in New York's Paramount theater Monday night.Dre, easily the evening's biggest winner, took home trophies for Artist of the Year (Solo), Album of the Year and Producer of the Year. Among those productions was Snoop Doggy Dogg's debut, "Doggy Style," a title that helped Snoop win the New Artist of the Year (Solo) and Lyricist of the Year awards.Staten Island's Wu-Tang Clan were named New Artist of the Year (Group)
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 28, 2000
The "Up in Smoke" tour, featuring Dr. Dre and some of the biggest names in West Coast rap, has been working its way across the country this summer. And despite concerns expressed by some music industry pundits when the tour was announced, gangsta rap onstage hasn't resulted in violence offstage; audiences have peacefully enjoyed the show's flashy production and nonstop string of hits. In short, "Up in Smoke" has been going like a house on fire. What went right? "I think the artists have a responsibility to set the tone," says Xzibit, one of the rappers on the tour.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 26, 1996
Even though rap has always been as much about rhythm as rhymes, its music men have traditionally drawn less attention than the word-slingers. So to the average fan, names like Marley Marl, Hank Shocklee, Herby Luv Bug and DJ Pooh mean almost nothing -- even though the hits these guys produced for L.L. Cool J, Public Enemy, Salt-n-Pepa and Ice Cube owe everything to their taste in samples and beats.Fortunately, that hasn't been the case with Dr. Dre. Perhaps the only true superstar producer in hip-hop, Dre is considered the architect of the gangsta rap sound, and has been responsible for 11 straight million-selling albums -- including NWA's "Straight Outta Compton," Snoop Doggy Dogg's "Doggy-style" and his solo album, "The Chronic" -- as well as innumerable hit singles.
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