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NEWS
June 26, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's announcement this week that she won't grant developers of the long-stalled Superblock another extension of their exclusive right to build on the property acknowledged a painful truth that has been apparent for some time: Nearly a decade after the first proposals were submitted, the massive redevelopment project that was supposed to transform the west side of downtown is dead in the water and unlikely to be revived any...
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
The Orioles tried to give Ubaldo Jimenez some work in a pressure-free situation Sunday afternoon, allowing the struggling right-hander to work the ninth inning with a seven-run lead. But Jimenez would last just five batters after loading the bases and walking in a run. He issued three walks and allowed a double to Brian Dozier, allowing four of the five batters he faced to reach base. After he left the mound to a chorus of boos from the hometown crowd at Camden Yards, he was charged with two more runs when Tommy Hunter gave up a two-run single that suddenly created a tense situation and a save opportunity for Zach Britton.
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FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 4, 2005
A feature in which Sun writers and critics sound off about the movies. After 60-plus years of unrivaled mastery of the animation field, Disney has abandoned the traditional drawing board in favor of pixels and computers and all manner of newfangled technology. That's supposed to make a difference? Chicken Little, the first release of the new technology-savvy Disney, hits theaters today accompanied by all manner of ballyhoo. The suggestion is that, after a string of films that under-performed at the box office, this new direction signifies a new start for the studio, an infusion of new blood, a reinvigorated bunch of storytellers now firmly entrenched on animation's cutting edge.
NEWS
June 26, 2013
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's announcement this week that she won't grant developers of the long-stalled Superblock another extension of their exclusive right to build on the property acknowledged a painful truth that has been apparent for some time: Nearly a decade after the first proposals were submitted, the massive redevelopment project that was supposed to transform the west side of downtown is dead in the water and unlikely to be revived any...
NEWS
March 17, 1997
THE ROUSE CO. is not accustomed to being told to go back to the drawing board. So executives of the Columbia-based real estate firm had to be caught off guard when the planning board in its own home county knocked its proposal to build a mini-Columbia in North Laurel.The panel was correct, however, in asking Rouse to provide more information before it decides whether to recommend the project to the zoning board. Members of the panel clearly were not comfortable with the sketchy outline that one resident, a college geography instructor, testified "would have gotten a 'C' " if submitted by one of his students.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | February 17, 2000
AFTER SPENDING more than a year developing a design for the Maryland Museum of African-American History and Culture in downtown Baltimore, sponsors of the $26 million project are going back to the drawing board. Maryland's Department of General Services has terminated the contract of the original architects and exhibit designer so that another team can be selected to complete the project. Nikki Smith, administrator of the state's African-American Initiative program and liaison to a citizens group that is overseeing planning for the museum, said officials hope to interview candidates in the next week or so and select a new architect by March.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | February 20, 1991
Whoever designed the USS Princeton: Back to the old drawing board.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 15, 1993
It's back to the old drawing board on Haiti.Nigel Hawthorne makes such a compelling "Madness of George III," he ought to do "Nixon in China."Woolworth's is getting out of the Woolworth's business. Goodbye Main Street, hello Mall.
SPORTS
By Buster Olney | June 15, 1995
On the field: Eddie Murray is closing in quickly on hit No. 3,000. Murray's two-out, broken-bat RBI single in the first inning was the 2,988th hit of his career, and it was his fourth hit of the series.In the dugout: The Orioles' offense is in such a funk that manager Phil Regan ordered the infield to play in with a runner on third in the second inning. At the time, Cleveland led 1-0. Regan's strategy paid off -- sort of. The infield was in with Tony Pena at the plate and Manny Ramirez on third, and Pena struck out. But the run scored anyway, when a breaking pitch by starter Scott Klingenbeck skipped past catcher Chris Hoiles.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | November 8, 1991
Developer Leonard Attman has abandoned plans to buy part of Redwood Street to build a $90 million office tower. He has gone back to the drawing board to come up with a scaled-down design for the southeast corner of Redwood and Charles streets.Elijah E. Cummings, Mr. Attman's attorney, said that the developer decided this week to ask the City Council to postpone two hearings on bills related to the project, called the Baltimore Financial Centre, so he could revise its design.He said the developer is aware the bills now will die in committee, but he felt it was more important to come up with a plan that satisfies the city and neighboring property owners.
NEWS
February 24, 2010
Leave it the Republicans in our General Assembly, who had their four years of opportunity and blew it to come up with some featherbrained schemes like those proposed by Sens. E.J Pipkin and David Brinkley ("GOP comes to the table," Feb. 24). These two sleepwalkers need to wake up and review past events owing to the fact that most of their spending cut proposals are rehashed washouts. Why in the world they harp on splitting teacher retirement costs with local governments and increasing state employee pension contributions is far beyond comprehension.
SPORTS
By RAY FRAGER and RAY FRAGER,ray.frager@baltsun.com | February 13, 2009
Digging up this week's sports media notes while wondering whether they don't do drug testing at the Westminster Kennel Club Dog Show because they don't want to mess up the carpets: * In the proud tradition of Peter Puck, Fox will feature "The Adventures of Digger and Friends" during its NASCAR telecasts this season. The first segment debuts Sunday during the Daytona 500 preview show (2 p.m., chs. 45, 5). Digger has accompanied Fox's in-track Gopher Cam, but now he's being upgraded to his own little show with a cast of characters, including the sure-to-be-hissable security guard badger, Lumpy Wheels.
NEWS
By Kimberly Marselas and Kimberly Marselas,Special to The Sun | September 19, 2007
Whether it's because of the slowing real estate market, developers' caution after a yearlong wait or just the naturally slow pace of paperwork, Annapolis officials aren't seeing a rush of applications since the city lifted its ban on major development. Planning and zoning Director Jon Arason said that since the city council ended the moratorium Sept. 10, he has just one new application to review: one submitted during the past year, but put on hold, to redevelop annexed property on Annapolis Neck Road.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 4, 2005
A feature in which Sun writers and critics sound off about the movies. After 60-plus years of unrivaled mastery of the animation field, Disney has abandoned the traditional drawing board in favor of pixels and computers and all manner of newfangled technology. That's supposed to make a difference? Chicken Little, the first release of the new technology-savvy Disney, hits theaters today accompanied by all manner of ballyhoo. The suggestion is that, after a string of films that under-performed at the box office, this new direction signifies a new start for the studio, an infusion of new blood, a reinvigorated bunch of storytellers now firmly entrenched on animation's cutting edge.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2004
The city's Design Advisory Panel sent architects of the proposed 750-room convention center hotel back to the drawing board yesterday, noting a variety of concerns about their initial plan, including that provisions for a high-speed magnetic levitation train prototype were inadequate. Members of the design panel also criticized the project, planned for a site just north of Oriole Park, for appearing too linear to encourage use as a gathering place. They were not satisfied with the design of the all-weather connector that would cross Howard Street linking the hotel to the Baltimore Convention Center.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | January 25, 2004
Dieting has consumed Americans for more than a century, even as the collective girth of the nation has increased and a steady stream of dieting books has rolled off the presses: Scarsdale, Beverly Hills, Zone, South Beach, and on and on. Like a circle in a spiral, diet fads have come and gone, then come back again -- sometimes with new frills and usually with more sophisticated marketing, but often barely changed. Sporadic, documented cases of dieting stretch back 1,000 years or more. But in America, dieting took off with a vengeance only at the end of the 19th century.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
The Orioles tried to give Ubaldo Jimenez some work in a pressure-free situation Sunday afternoon, allowing the struggling right-hander to work the ninth inning with a seven-run lead. But Jimenez would last just five batters after loading the bases and walking in a run. He issued three walks and allowed a double to Brian Dozier, allowing four of the five batters he faced to reach base. After he left the mound to a chorus of boos from the hometown crowd at Camden Yards, he was charged with two more runs when Tommy Hunter gave up a two-run single that suddenly created a tense situation and a save opportunity for Zach Britton.
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