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Drastic Measures

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By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | February 6, 1996
Trimming fat in the school budget may not be enough, not this year. With cherished programs on the line, many parents are saying it may be time for more drastic measures.The 1996-1997 school budget proposal is being read, reread and aired in public like no previous one in Carroll County. More parents than ever are poring over it page by page, and showing up at hearings such as the one scheduled for tonight at 7 p.m. at Liberty High School.The spotlight is on the budget because the proposed cuts in the $146 million plan go deeper than ever before and closer to parents' hearts, threatening elementary instrumental music, education for the gifted, advanced-level high school courses and small classes.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | March 6, 2013
Navy's 11-2 loss to Patriot League rival Bucknell this past Saturday was exacerbated by a poor offensive showing highlighted by zero goals in the contest's final three quarters. Despite the inability to score a goal in the final 51 minutes, coach Rick Sowell was hesitant to declare wholesale changes in the starting lineup for Saturday's home game against Lafayette. “Everything's under the gun,” Sowell said Tuesday. “We're re-evaluating the situation. I don't know if we have to make drastic changes.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee | August 16, 2012
Anthony Allen may not have the decisive edge in a four-way battle to back up starting tailback Ray Rice, but his weight won't be an issue. The 6-foot-1 Allen said he weighs about 225 pounds, which is 10 pounds less than his weight from last season. He said the weight loss coincided with shaving five percent of his body fat - all in the name of being a better back. “I just toned up,” he said after Wednesday's practice at the team's headquarters in Owings Mills. "I just wanted to get a little faster, a little quicker.
SPORTS
By Edward Lee | August 16, 2012
Anthony Allen may not have the decisive edge in a four-way battle to back up starting tailback Ray Rice, but his weight won't be an issue. The 6-foot-1 Allen said he weighs about 225 pounds, which is 10 pounds less than his weight from last season. He said the weight loss coincided with shaving five percent of his body fat - all in the name of being a better back. “I just toned up,” he said after Wednesday's practice at the team's headquarters in Owings Mills. "I just wanted to get a little faster, a little quicker.
NEWS
March 11, 2007
The Colony By John Tayman From 1866 through 1969, the Hawaiian and American governments banished nearly 9,000 leprosy sufferers into exile on a peninsula on the Hawaiian island of Molokai. Former Outside editor Tayman crafts a tale of fear, endurance and hope in telling the story of these unfortunate victims of ignorance (leprosy is caused by a simple bacterium and isn't nearly as contagious as was long believed). After a smallpox epidemic wiped out a fifth of the Hawaiian population in the 1850s, leprosy was seen as the next cataclysmic threat, and drastic measures were taken.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
If terrorists blew up a building or unleashed a biological attack in Maryland, the governor could suspend some laws and assume control over local police and health care professionals under a proposal in Gov. Parris N. Glendening's security package. The bill would allow the governor to delegate that sweeping authority to any person he or she chose. Residents who disobeyed orders from the governor or the designee could face up to three years in prison. "Even if we didn't have [the Sept.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 23, 1990
THE SUPREME COURT, ignoring its own precedents, has let stand a federal judge's gag order forbidding Cable News Network from broadcasting tapes of Manuel Noriega's jailhouse telephone conversations. The court offered no explanation for its stunning and potentially far-reaching decision. Its 7-2 vote, refusing both CNN's emergency request to lift the stay and its appeal on the merits of the gag order, means that for now at least the effort to deny CNN its right of free speech remains in force.
NEWS
January 2, 1991
A spate of holiday shootings in which teen-agers were involved both as victims and as perpetrators underscores the current epidemic of handgun violence and the deadly trade in weapons that fuels it. In one incident, a young Crofton engineer and father of two was shot to death in the parking lot behind his office, allegedly by two youths ages 15 and 16. In another, a 19-year-old was fatally wounded Monday during a running gun battle between the occupants of...
NEWS
By GREG BARRETT and GREG BARRETT,SUN REPORTER | January 2, 2006
LANGLEY PARK -- A religiously and racially charged dispute on one of Maryland's most gang-ridden streets is triggering a turf war of David-and-Goliath proportions. Pitted against each other are the small and financially struggling Langley Park Boys and Girls Club and the Archdiocese of Washington. The Boys and Girls Club, which has a predominantly black membership, occupies 3 acres at the center of the dispute in a Hispanic neighborhood in Prince George's County that is notorious for Mara Salvatrucha, a violent Central American youth gang known as MS-13.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | October 2, 1996
County department chiefs say Carroll needs to spend half-a-billion dollars during the next six years -- including $100 million in the fiscal year that begins in July -- for roads, schools, a jail expansion and other capital projects.The county officials began laying out their spending proposals yesterday in the first of three days of review by the county Planning and Zoning Commission, the initial hurdle department heads must clear if they hope to have their projects included in the county's 1998 capital budget or in Carroll's five-year capital funding plan.
NEWS
May 6, 2009
When Gov. Martin O'Malley shuttered five schools in Maryland last week after the discovery of several suspected cases of the swine flu, the closures seemed prudent given how little was known about the virulence of the disease and its ability to spread. Most of what we did know was ominous: It was a strain that had never appeared before in humans, it struck healthy, young adults, it appeared nearly simultaneously in countries around the world, and it was already responsible for more than 20 deaths in Mexico and one in the United States.
NEWS
March 18, 2008
The Federal Reserve's dramatic steps to shore up America's financial markets and avert a crisis of the global financial system had to be done. Not to have acted would have threatened a far more precarious situation on Wall Street and beyond. The Fed's moves, including making secured loans available to every major investment firm, were prudent steps to protect broader markets and instill confidence in the system. The actions were announced Sunday as the Fed directed a negotiated sale of Bear Stearns, an investment house that found itself unable to borrow needed cash last week because of rumored losses on its subprime mortgage bond holdings.
NEWS
March 11, 2007
The Colony By John Tayman From 1866 through 1969, the Hawaiian and American governments banished nearly 9,000 leprosy sufferers into exile on a peninsula on the Hawaiian island of Molokai. Former Outside editor Tayman crafts a tale of fear, endurance and hope in telling the story of these unfortunate victims of ignorance (leprosy is caused by a simple bacterium and isn't nearly as contagious as was long believed). After a smallpox epidemic wiped out a fifth of the Hawaiian population in the 1850s, leprosy was seen as the next cataclysmic threat, and drastic measures were taken.
NEWS
By GREG BARRETT and GREG BARRETT,SUN REPORTER | January 2, 2006
LANGLEY PARK -- A religiously and racially charged dispute on one of Maryland's most gang-ridden streets is triggering a turf war of David-and-Goliath proportions. Pitted against each other are the small and financially struggling Langley Park Boys and Girls Club and the Archdiocese of Washington. The Boys and Girls Club, which has a predominantly black membership, occupies 3 acres at the center of the dispute in a Hispanic neighborhood in Prince George's County that is notorious for Mara Salvatrucha, a violent Central American youth gang known as MS-13.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2005
Moving to turn around some of Baltimore's worst-performing schools, the state school board approved a plan yesterday to replace teachers and other staff at three schools with persistently low test scores. In a related action, city school officials said they are planning to replace part of the staff at several other schools. At Cherry Hill Elementary/Middle School, everyone from the principal down to the secretaries was required this spring to reapply for their jobs, said city schools Chief Academic Officer Linda Chinnia.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | February 14, 2002
If terrorists blew up a building or unleashed a biological attack in Maryland, the governor could suspend some laws and assume control over local police and health care professionals under a proposal in Gov. Parris N. Glendening's security package. The bill would allow the governor to delegate that sweeping authority to any person he or she chose. Residents who disobeyed orders from the governor or the designee could face up to three years in prison. "Even if we didn't have [the Sept.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2001
State legislators said yesterday they are "alarmed and embarrassed" by the Baltimore school system's projected shortfall of nearly $36 million and warned that it might undermine efforts to obtain more state funds. "People ought to be alarmed," said Del. Howard P. Rawlings, a Baltimore Democrat and chairman of the House Appropriations Committee. "I am alarmed, embarrassed and troubled. We invested substantial state funds - and we go back and ask for more - and we find out the school system can't manage the money it has."
NEWS
By WILEY A. HALL | March 28, 1995
Under current law in most places, a deadbeat dad can be sent to prison for failing to support his children. His name can be turned over to credit bureaus. A lien can be placed against his real estate property, and his wages can be attached.Even so, the U.S. Justice Department reported last year that, nationwide, noncustodial parents -- the overwhelming majority are fathers -- owe more than $34 billion in delinquent child-support payments.Cracking down on deadbeat dads has become a political rallying cry in both Washington and Annapolis and a key component of welfare reform.
NEWS
By Allison Klein and Allison Klein,SUN STAFF | January 6, 2001
State legislators said yesterday they are "alarmed and embarrassed" by the Baltimore school system's projected shortfall of nearly $36 million and warned that it might undermine efforts to obtain more state funds. "People ought to be alarmed," said Del. Howard P. Rawlings, a Baltimore Democrat and chairman of the House Appropriations Committee. "I am alarmed, embarrassed and troubled. We invested substantial state funds - and we go back and ask for more - and we find out the school system can't manage the money it has."
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