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NEWS
February 3, 2005
Julia Ellen Villanti, a retired department store drapery worker, died of cancer Jan. 27 at North Arundel Hospital. The Glen Burnie resident was 86. Born Julia Ellen Bullard in High Point, N.C., she moved to the Towson area in the early 1940s to work as an attendant at the Sheppard Pratt Hospital. She later worked in Hutzler's drapery fabrication division on West Lombard Street, preparing curtains for home delivery. She retired in 1983. Her husband of 33 years, Modesto Villanti, a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad traffic clerk, died in 1980.
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NEWS
February 3, 2005
Julia Ellen Villanti, a retired department store drapery worker, died of cancer Jan. 27 at North Arundel Hospital. The Glen Burnie resident was 86. Born Julia Ellen Bullard in High Point, N.C., she moved to the Towson area in the early 1940s to work as an attendant at the Sheppard Pratt Hospital. She later worked in Hutzler's drapery fabrication division on West Lombard Street, preparing curtains for home delivery. She retired in 1983. Her husband of 33 years, Modesto Villanti, a Baltimore & Ohio Railroad traffic clerk, died in 1980.
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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1998
Reuben Henry Grodnitzky officially retired more than 20 years ago from the business he founded in the 1930s, but he never really stopped working.Until his final illness, the 87-year-old, known as "Mr. Henry," was a presence at Henry's Drapery and Shade Co. at 415 E. Oliver St.Mr. Grodnitzky, an Arbutus resident, died Thursday of pneumonia at Northwest Hospital."His retirement was a family joke," said Kim Shifren, a granddaughter. "He owned the business for almost 70 years and could never stop working.
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | July 25, 2004
From simple sheers to lavish silk-embroidered panels, draperies are so much more than window dressing. They can shape a room's personality and ground its design style. Fashion colors, patterns and a range of styles to blend with interiors once were available only as custom options. Ready-to-hang curtains had a bland, generic look, usually off-white and pinch-pleated. In recent years, retailers and catalogs made shopping easier -- if you had standard-sized windows. But now, even if a 10-foot-tall window needs to be dressed, the search for appropriate attire is not impossible.
FEATURES
By YOLANDA GARFIELD | April 26, 1992
An interior designer and expert on gardens, a pair of architects, and the owners of one of the East Coast's best-known wholesale drapery houses have already proven they are experts at feathering the nests of their clients. Their own homes are treats for the eye, too, laden as they are with soul-satisfying, down-home comforts and trend-defying family treasures. Among the stories in this Home Design issue are three that will take you into the private, distinctive worlds of these design professionals.
NEWS
February 28, 2004
Carol Ann Denick, an interior designer and longtime Reisterstown resident, died of cancer Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 47. She was born in Baltimore and raised in Lutherville. She was a 1975 graduate of St. Timothy's School and earned a bachelor's degree in interior design from Ohio University in 1979. After spending a year in Israel volunteering and studying, she returned to Baltimore in the early 1980s and established Paper Hang Up, a wallpaper and interior design store.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1999
Alexander John "Zandy" Leaderman, an industrialist and philanthropist, died Friday at Sinai Hospital of injuries suffered in a fall Oct. 28 at his Pikesville home. He was 80.The day before, he had worked a full day at his company, East Baltimore-based Rockland Industries Inc., said his son Stephen Leaderman of Baltimore, the company's vice president and treasurer. Rockland Industries is the world's largest manufacturer of drapery liners. Its success is based in large part on the patented fabric Roc-Lon, which does not shrink when washed and resists oil and water.
FEATURES
By Dylan Landis and Dylan Landis,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | January 19, 1997
Beneath its two-story-high cathedral ceiling, Jack Lenor Larsen's living room in Long Island, N.Y., could have felt too vast TTC for comfort. Instead, it's almost intimate because Larsen upholstered the entire space, straight to the ceiling's peak, with straw-colored Egyptian damask.Interior designer Marjorie Shushan also grappled with visually cool surroundings: a Manhattan apartment with no distinguishing architecture. To give the place character, she assembled an orchestra of textures: silk taffeta on the sofas, antique tapestry on the ottomans, 18th-century embroidery on the pillows.
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | July 28, 1991
Back in the 1940s Rita Hayworth put on that black lace nightie and became World War II's No. 1 pinup. Lace was back in style, even if you only peeked at it. But the postwar world turned its back on lace for the living room. Much too frilly-fussy for all that "contemporary"-styled furniture.Now lace is back again big, really big, and not just in the dress world. Interior designers who only months ago were reveling in the "arts," both deco and nouveau style, have taken to the lacy trend. What Mrs. O'Leary hung on her front windows back in 1891 (and sometimes even made herself)
FEATURES
By Charlyne Varkonyi | November 24, 1990
Sometimes it really is the little things that count, even in home decorating.That's good news right now when we're digging deeper into our pockets for everything from holiday gifts to food and drink for entertaining.True, most of us don't have a lot of extra cash to throw around these days, but even so we want our homes to look fresh and inviting for the upcoming prime entertaining season. So, we asked four local design professionals to put together a baker's dozen ofeasy decorating pick-me-ups for under $100.
NEWS
February 28, 2004
Carol Ann Denick, an interior designer and longtime Reisterstown resident, died of cancer Monday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. She was 47. She was born in Baltimore and raised in Lutherville. She was a 1975 graduate of St. Timothy's School and earned a bachelor's degree in interior design from Ohio University in 1979. After spending a year in Israel volunteering and studying, she returned to Baltimore in the early 1980s and established Paper Hang Up, a wallpaper and interior design store.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | November 8, 1999
Alexander John "Zandy" Leaderman, an industrialist and philanthropist, died Friday at Sinai Hospital of injuries suffered in a fall Oct. 28 at his Pikesville home. He was 80.The day before, he had worked a full day at his company, East Baltimore-based Rockland Industries Inc., said his son Stephen Leaderman of Baltimore, the company's vice president and treasurer. Rockland Industries is the world's largest manufacturer of drapery liners. Its success is based in large part on the patented fabric Roc-Lon, which does not shrink when washed and resists oil and water.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | August 23, 1998
Reuben Henry Grodnitzky officially retired more than 20 years ago from the business he founded in the 1930s, but he never really stopped working.Until his final illness, the 87-year-old, known as "Mr. Henry," was a presence at Henry's Drapery and Shade Co. at 415 E. Oliver St.Mr. Grodnitzky, an Arbutus resident, died Thursday of pneumonia at Northwest Hospital."His retirement was a family joke," said Kim Shifren, a granddaughter. "He owned the business for almost 70 years and could never stop working.
FEATURES
By Dylan Landis and Dylan Landis,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | January 19, 1997
Beneath its two-story-high cathedral ceiling, Jack Lenor Larsen's living room in Long Island, N.Y., could have felt too vast TTC for comfort. Instead, it's almost intimate because Larsen upholstered the entire space, straight to the ceiling's peak, with straw-colored Egyptian damask.Interior designer Marjorie Shushan also grappled with visually cool surroundings: a Manhattan apartment with no distinguishing architecture. To give the place character, she assembled an orchestra of textures: silk taffeta on the sofas, antique tapestry on the ottomans, 18th-century embroidery on the pillows.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer | August 8, 1993
Q: Please give me some advice about top treatments for windows. I'm considering such an addition for a pair of windows along one wall in my small dining room, which is furnished with 18th-century-style mahogany pieces. Specifically, I need to know it's all right to use a top treatment with window coverings other than draperies.A: Yes, it's quite all right, though the effect will look best if the entire window treatment is kept simple. Its color and texture should also blend with the nearby wall, whether painted or papered.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | May 18, 1992
Alexander J. Leaderman looks you straight in the eye, and with a deadpan expression, says: "Now I'm going tell you something that will shock you." He pauses a second or two for effect. "I want to get into every bedroom in America. Actually, I want to get into every bedroom in the world."Mr. Leaderman, a bespectacled 74-year-old with thinning gray hair and sense of humor, is quick to laugh at his play on words, which sums up the goal he has set for his East Baltimore company, Rockland Industries Inc.He is chairman of Rockland, which makes Roc-Lon brand drapery liner fabrics, including a Lights Out line that blocks sunlight and keeps bedrooms dark.
FEATURES
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer | August 8, 1993
Q: Please give me some advice about top treatments for windows. I'm considering such an addition for a pair of windows along one wall in my small dining room, which is furnished with 18th-century-style mahogany pieces. Specifically, I need to know it's all right to use a top treatment with window coverings other than draperies.A: Yes, it's quite all right, though the effect will look best if the entire window treatment is kept simple. Its color and texture should also blend with the nearby wall, whether painted or papered.
NEWS
By Deidre Nerreau McCabe and Deidre Nerreau McCabe,Staff writer | December 27, 1991
For 34 years, Seymour Goldberg has decked the windows, walls and sometimes halls of thousands of county homes.He's adorned the windows and walls of a 17-room mansion for a cool $50,000. And he's taken jobs for less than $10. Last week, he rang up one for "$4 and change" for four shower curtain hooks.He's outfitted fashionable homes in exclusive Gibson Island and modest homes in Glen Burnie. He's taken on almost every kind of job, big and small, during three decades in the custom drapery business.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | May 18, 1992
Alexander J. Leaderman looks you straight in the eye, and with a deadpan expression, says: "Now I'm going tell you something that will shock you." He pauses a second or two for effect. "I want to get into every bedroom in America. Actually, I want to get into every bedroom in the world."Mr. Leaderman, a bespectacled 74-year-old with thinning gray hair and witty sense of humor, is quick to laugh at his play on words, which sums up the goal he has set for his East Baltimore company, Rockland Industries Inc.He is chairman of Rockland, which makes Roc-Lon brand drapery liner fabrics, including a Lights Out line that blocks sunlight and keeps bedrooms dark.
FEATURES
By YOLANDA GARFIELD | April 26, 1992
An interior designer and expert on gardens, a pair of architects, and the owners of one of the East Coast's best-known wholesale drapery houses have already proven they are experts at feathering the nests of their clients. Their own homes are treats for the eye, too, laden as they are with soul-satisfying, down-home comforts and trend-defying family treasures. Among the stories in this Home Design issue are three that will take you into the private, distinctive worlds of these design professionals.
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