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By Baltimore Sun reporter | January 19, 2010
The Maryland Stadium Authority voted Tuesday to approve a $350,000 project to improve the dugout and tunnel drainage in Oriole Park. In August 2009, during a game between the Orioles and Cleveland Indians, a lengthy rain delay resulted in nearly a foot of water pooling in the Orioles' and Indians' dugouts. Over an inch of rain fell in 20 minutes, according to Orioles officials, and that resulted in both dugouts flooding to the top step. Umpires considered suspending the game until workers were eventually able to unclog the circular drains.
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The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2014
An Anne Arundel County man was arrested Friday after police said he threatened violence against a county councilman and the presiding officers of the General Assembly - an incident allegedly touched off by his outrage over the construction of a drainage pond. Paul David Grimm, 58, of 100 block of Tarks Lane in Severna Park, was charged with three counts of threatening a public official. Police said the threats came after Councilman Dick Ladd visited Grimm's neighborhood to discuss his concerns about the project in his community.
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | May 10, 1998
A toddler was being treated at Johns Hopkins Hospital last night after being found trapped in a drainage area in the basement of her Joppa home yesterday, fire officials in Harford County said.The child, who is about 15 months old and whose name was not released, was found by her father about 8 p.m. in a sump pump drain, according to Chief James B. Lyons III of the Joppa-Magnolia Volunteer Fire Company.The home is in the 1500 block of Clayton Road.Fire officials did not know last night how the child ended up in the water.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The promise of warm weather and the threat of more rain through the rest of this week have pushed the State Highway Administration to craft a two-pronged plan for its continuing winter clean-up operations. The focus: potholes and drainage. Recent cold snaps and snowfalls have left many roadways crumbling in spots, the result of freezing water cracking surfaces and plows and layers of salt compounding the damage. Warmer weather is preferable to cold in fixing pot holes. High temperatures from Wednesday through the weekend are expected to hover between 40 and 60 degrees, according to the National Weather Service.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writer | December 16, 1994
Michael and Denise Warshauer keep a dozen sandbags in front of their garage, knowing that thunderstorms can wash away their yard and flood their North Laurel home."
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 1, 1999
TO WHOM IT MAY CONCERN:FUTURE EDITORS, REPORTERS:If mention is ever made again of Dolan's Bar, please know that the Dolan family .. Joe Dolan's son, Brian and his daughter, Margaret Sherwood ... say an anecdote that appeared in my column on Dec. 1, 1999 was false. Specifically, the story about Joe Dolan attending his wife's funeral disguised as a woman. That, they say is pure myth. The Dolans ask that we not repeat this in the future. They did not want me to publish a correction or apology in my column.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,Staff Writer | September 14, 1993
About 50 North Laurel Park residents voiced their concerns last night to a developer who plans to build more than 60 new homes in a community they say is already too crowded.The problems, residents say, are too many children and not enough space in area schools, heavy traffic, and inadequate storm water drainage."The traffic pattern is going to be awful," said Chris Maynard, who lives on Baltimore Avenue with a proposed construction site behind his house.Speed bumps have been added to Baltimore Avenue to slow cars passing through the residential neighborhood, but the people expressed fears that more homes will add to the traffic volume on the two-lane through street and increase the danger to their children.
SPORTS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2000
"Perfect greenness," a phrase coined by one writer in recalling her first look at a major-league baseball stadium, would normally describe the playing field at Oriole Park at Camden Yards. So why does the place now look like a construction zone? Because it is. Heavy equipment rumbled around the stadium yesterday, stripping grass from the outfield and excavating mounds of clay from the infield. Forced to action by a malady that was drowning large sections of turf, the Orioles and the Maryland Stadium Authority are replacing the field for the first time in the stadium's nine-season history.
NEWS
November 23, 1998
IT MAY BE a cliche, but "pay now or pay later" describes Howard County's options for repairing and replacing aging storm water pipes and drains.The work has to be done before a system failure causes even more expense. Yet the county's elected officials in the past have succumbed to public pressure instead to invest extra money in schools and public safety.County Executive Charles I. Ecker, whose eight-year tenure ends Dec. 7, says one of his few regrets is not having established a long-range plan to pay for improvements in the storm water drainage system.
NEWS
By Craig Timberg and Craig Timberg,SUN STAFF | January 24, 1997
Since it was sliced into a thousand tiny lots in 1898, North Laurel Park has been a case study in unplanned growth -- a dense patchwork of homes connected by narrow streets without sidewalks, proper drainage or apparent forethought.Almost a century later, Howard County officials have developed a plan that may finally upgrade the infrastructure in this southernmost corner of the county to modern standards -- and perhaps ease the flooding that regularly sweeps through the community.Under the plan, developers building the newest sections of North Laurel Park could opt to ask the county to build their developments' infrastructure according to current standards.
NEWS
June 14, 2013
The answer to the new stormwater fees and requirements is porous asphalt ("Churches seek break on city stormwater fee," June 12). When such asphalt is used, rainwater drains through the top layer and eventually runs back into the soil underneath the asphalt. This eliminates the need for drainage structures and drainage areas and stops runoff into ecologically sensitive or protected waterways. Moreover, it costs less overall than traditional paving options, is better for the environment and should be exempt from the high fees imposed by local governments.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 23, 2013
It was an opportunity no kid could pass up: a rare permission to spray-paint school property - with grown-ups watching, no less. Students at Bryant Woods Elementary weren't creating graffiti. Instead, they stenciled "DON'T DUMP, CHESAPEAKE BAY DRAINAGE" in green lettering on a white background atop a storm drain - part of the school's efforts to educate Howard County residents about ways to protect the Chesapeake Bay, the nation's largest estuary. Bryant Woods' entire student body, as well as teachers, administrators and guests, gathered at one of the schools concrete-and-metal drains last week and cheered as a group of fifth-graders kicked off the Columbia school's Storm Drain Stenciling Project.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2012
For the third time since July, city public works crews have found a hole in a 120-year-old drainage culvert beneath East Monument Street near Johns Hopkins Hospital - another setback in a months-long effort to fix and reopen the road. The small hole opened early Thursday morning about 125 feet from where a much larger hole in the culvert caused a sinkhole to open July 25, officials said. Heavy rains caused that sinkhole to reopen and expand Aug. 26. The 10-foot-wide tunnel receives storm water from smaller drainage pipes from a large part of the city and carries it to the Baltimore Harbor.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | July 25, 2012
In the latest example of Baltimore's aging infrastructure's causing damage to city streets, a large sinkhole opened on East Monument Street near Johns Hopkins Hospital on Wednesday afternoon - causing a stretch of the road to be closed and nearby businesses to be evacuated. The hole, estimated to be about 2 feet wide, 6 feet long and 20 feet deep, closed East Monument about 1 p.m. between North Patterson Park Avenue and North Montford Avenue, while a strong smell of gas forced businesses to close and brought Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. repair crews to the scene.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler | March 27, 2010
State officials announced Friday that they had fined an Eastern Shore farm couple $4,000 for improperly piling sewage sludge near a drainage ditch. But the Department of the Environment declared it had closed its investigation of the Hudson farm in Berlin with no further action because its inspectors could not say the farm was responsible for pollution found in the ditches draining its land. State inspectors had detected high levels of bacteria and nutrients in the ditches, which ultimately drain into the Pocomoke River.
SPORTS
By Baltimore Sun reporter | January 19, 2010
The Maryland Stadium Authority voted Tuesday to approve a $350,000 project to improve the dugout and tunnel drainage in Oriole Park. In August 2009, during a game between the Orioles and Cleveland Indians, a lengthy rain delay resulted in nearly a foot of water pooling in the Orioles' and Indians' dugouts. Over an inch of rain fell in 20 minutes, according to Orioles officials, and that resulted in both dugouts flooding to the top step. Umpires considered suspending the game until workers were eventually able to unclog the circular drains.
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | February 18, 2014
The promise of warm weather and the threat of more rain through the rest of this week have pushed the State Highway Administration to craft a two-pronged plan for its continuing winter clean-up operations. The focus: potholes and drainage. Recent cold snaps and snowfalls have left many roadways crumbling in spots, the result of freezing water cracking surfaces and plows and layers of salt compounding the damage. Warmer weather is preferable to cold in fixing pot holes. High temperatures from Wednesday through the weekend are expected to hover between 40 and 60 degrees, according to the National Weather Service.
NEWS
By DAVID NITKIN and DAVID NITKIN,SUN REPORTER | February 7, 2006
Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. tries to keep his passion for golf private, but there are times when his activities on the links spill into public view. Those glimpses show that the governor's hobby can lead to financial benefits - for him and his partners on the course. Recently released campaign finance documents show fresh details about Ehrlich's June 2005 fundraiser at the Elkridge Club, an exclusive country club that straddles the city-county line in northern Baltimore and which at the time had never admitted a black member.
FEATURES
By Holly Selby | July 31, 2008
Glaucoma, a disease of the optic nerve that, left untreated, can cause blindness, occurs in approximately 1 percent to 2 percent of the population over the age of 40, says Dr. Donald Abrams, chief of Sinai Hospital's Department of Ophthalmology based at the Krieger Eye Institute. However, in some populations, such as among African-Americans, the disease occurs more frequently; and in some age groups, it can occur in 6 percent to 10 percent of the population. But the disease often goes undiscovered - and untreated.
FEATURES
By Mary G. Pepitone and Mary G. Pepitone,Universal Press Syndicate | April 5, 2008
This spring, get your head into the gutter and think about your home's drainage system. April's showers can bring May's foundation problems if your home's gutters and downspouts aren't working properly to redirect water away from your house. "Gutters and downspouts serve as a home's rainwater management system," says architect Craig Newick, owner of Newick Architects in New Haven, Conn. "The goal is to get the rain off the roof and onto the ground without splashing onto the building's walls or into the basement."
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