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Dragnet

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By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2010
On the eve of a candlelight vigil for a 72-year-old man killed during a robbery, City Councilwoman Belinda Conaway called Wednesday for a "dragnet" by city police and federal law enforcement officers to crack down on street violence. "We need to multiply the efforts to get the violent offenders off the street who seem determined to terrorize the innocent residents of Baltimore," Conaway, a Northwest Baltimore Democrat, said in a statement. "With the decline in municipal resources, we need to bring federal law enforcement into the effort in a greater way."
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NEWS
March 31, 2013
The results of the recent Maryland State Police dragnet indicate that there is an ongoing and potentially dangerous problem with many trucks driving in and through Maryland ("State police safety dragnet takes 114 trucks off road," March 28). Yet it has been six years since the police performed this type of dragnet in Baltimore. It seems obvious that the 114 safety defects discovered should cause the police to make a policy to perform these inspections much more often in Baltimore as well as the rest of the state.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
— Just after dawn Tuesday, law enforcement officers began yanking hundreds of trucks off the Capital Beltway and funneling them to an inspection lot a long touchdown pass from FedEx Field. The truck-safety dragnet pulled over 420 rigs and resulted in 12 drivers and 87 vehicles being taken off the road. Offenses ranged from falsified log books and drivers spending too many hours behind the wheel to bad tires and defective brakes. "Within an hour, drivers from Maine to Florida will know we're out here," said State Police Capt.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
One of every five commercial trucks pulled over in Baltimore by Maryland State Police inspectors during a two-day sweep this week was impounded for safety defects. In addition to the 114 defective trucks, 21 drivers were barred from driving for violations. The dragnet, the first in the city in six years, used 45 troopers from across the state to monitor highway ramps and prowl city streets. Trucks selected for inspection were either pulled over along Broening Highway and Fairfield Road, access roads to the port of Baltimore, or herded to a parking lot at M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
One of every five commercial trucks pulled over in Baltimore by Maryland State Police inspectors during a two-day sweep this week was impounded for safety defects. In addition to the 114 defective trucks, 21 drivers were barred from driving for violations. The dragnet, the first in the city in six years, used 45 troopers from across the state to monitor highway ramps and prowl city streets. Trucks selected for inspection were either pulled over along Broening Highway and Fairfield Road, access roads to the port of Baltimore, or herded to a parking lot at M&T Bank Stadium.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | August 21, 2001
STANFORD, Calif. - The U.S. Department of Education and the National Institutes of Health have launched a campaign to get a government program created to "identify" children with autism at age 2 and then subject them to "intensive" early intervention for 25 hours a week or more. It sounds good, but so have so many other government programs that created more problems than they solved. Just who is to "identify" these children and by what criteria? A legal case in Nebraska shows the dangers in creating a government-mandated dragnet that can subject all sorts of children to hours of disagreeable, ineffective or even counterproductive treatment for something they do not have.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1995
The previews you are about to read are true. The names have not been changed, since there are no innocent. On Dec. 29, "Dragnet" is pulled off the Nick-at-Nite schedule. In a few paragraphs, the results of that decision.* "Great Performances" (9:30 p.m.-11 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Hear the works of the man who is possibly America's greatest living Broadway lyricist, as Betty Buckley, Glenn Close, Bill Irwin, Madeline Kahn and others join together for "Sondheim: A Celebration at Carnegie Hall."
NEWS
February 15, 1998
IT IS NO SECRET that independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's fishing expedition into President Clinton's private life has ridiculed, humiliated and trivialized this nation before the eyes of the world and its own citizens. But that is hardly the end of it.All of it is new ground, everything a precedent. So look carefully. In this massive dragnet for sexual peccadilloes -- faintly disguised as a hunt for the crime of perjury in a civil lawsuit that involves a fishing expedition for sexual material -- Mr. Starr's prosecutors have transformed relationships in government.
NEWS
March 31, 2013
The results of the recent Maryland State Police dragnet indicate that there is an ongoing and potentially dangerous problem with many trucks driving in and through Maryland ("State police safety dragnet takes 114 trucks off road," March 28). Yet it has been six years since the police performed this type of dragnet in Baltimore. It seems obvious that the 114 safety defects discovered should cause the police to make a policy to perform these inspections much more often in Baltimore as well as the rest of the state.
NEWS
July 4, 2005
IMMIGRANTS who were wrongly ensnared in the post-9/11 law enforcement dragnet have learned a thing or two about the American justice system since the attacks. Unfortunately, much of what they learned was bad. Arrested and labeled "persons of special interest" by the U.S. government -- thus implying they had some connection to the investigation of the 2001 terrorist attacks and were security risks -- they were subjected to secret court hearings and held in detention without charge or bond.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
— Just after dawn Tuesday, law enforcement officers began yanking hundreds of trucks off the Capital Beltway and funneling them to an inspection lot a long touchdown pass from FedEx Field. The truck-safety dragnet pulled over 420 rigs and resulted in 12 drivers and 87 vehicles being taken off the road. Offenses ranged from falsified log books and drivers spending too many hours behind the wheel to bad tires and defective brakes. "Within an hour, drivers from Maine to Florida will know we're out here," said State Police Capt.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2010
On the eve of a candlelight vigil for a 72-year-old man killed during a robbery, City Councilwoman Belinda Conaway called Wednesday for a "dragnet" by city police and federal law enforcement officers to crack down on street violence. "We need to multiply the efforts to get the violent offenders off the street who seem determined to terrorize the innocent residents of Baltimore," Conaway, a Northwest Baltimore Democrat, said in a statement. "With the decline in municipal resources, we need to bring federal law enforcement into the effort in a greater way."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | May 20, 2007
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- Two of the three U.S. soldiers missing since a May 12 ambush south of Baghdad are believed to have been alive as recently as Friday morning, but the third might be dead, the military said yesterday. The fate of the men has been the focus of a huge dragnet by U.S. troops, who have detained more than 700 people for questioning in and around Yusifiya, a market town 10 miles south of the capital. Information obtained from the detainees and other sources has provided a clearer picture of the ambush, but the military does not know the men's fates definitively, the top U.S. commander in Iraq said in an interview with Army Times published yesterday and confirmed by a spokesman, Col. Steven A. Boylan.
NEWS
July 4, 2005
IMMIGRANTS who were wrongly ensnared in the post-9/11 law enforcement dragnet have learned a thing or two about the American justice system since the attacks. Unfortunately, much of what they learned was bad. Arrested and labeled "persons of special interest" by the U.S. government -- thus implying they had some connection to the investigation of the 2001 terrorist attacks and were security risks -- they were subjected to secret court hearings and held in detention without charge or bond.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and By David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | May 26, 2002
There is more than a little understatement at play when Steven Bochco, co-creator of such landmark police series as Hill Street Blues and NYPD Blue, says, "I always thought the television cop drama was a pretty good way to look at America." Bochco, the man behind some of the most successful cop dramas in TV history, knows it's a very good way to look at America. It has been, in fact, one of the most enduring and resonant formulas in which to see our collective fears and aspirations symbolically played out on the landscape of prime-time television.
NEWS
By Thomas Sowell | August 21, 2001
STANFORD, Calif. - The U.S. Department of Education and the National Institutes of Health have launched a campaign to get a government program created to "identify" children with autism at age 2 and then subject them to "intensive" early intervention for 25 hours a week or more. It sounds good, but so have so many other government programs that created more problems than they solved. Just who is to "identify" these children and by what criteria? A legal case in Nebraska shows the dangers in creating a government-mandated dragnet that can subject all sorts of children to hours of disagreeable, ineffective or even counterproductive treatment for something they do not have.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | July 8, 1994
T is for the "T.G.I.F." lineup. I is for the intermittent ads. R is for the reruns that are rampant. E is for the ennui that I have. D is for the dismal summer schedule. (And I, I know you know that I am right.) Put them all together, they spell T-I-R-E-D. Which sums up yet another Friday night.* "People vs. O.J. Simpson" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Brian Williams will anchor this analysis of the O. J. Simpson preliminary hearing to date with defense attorneys Gerry Spence and Charles Ogletree (attorney for Anita Hill)
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Sun Staff Writer | June 27, 1994
Democratic gubernatorial candidate American Joe Miedusiewski will begin airing his second radio "attack ad" today, a 60-second spot that accuses party front-runner Parris N. Glendening of "exaggerating his resume."Although unstated in the ad, Mr. Miedusiewski, a state senator from Baltimore, said the allegation refers to Mr. Glendening's claim that he was a police commissioner when he served on the city council of Hyattsville in 1973 and 1974. Mr. Miedusiewski contends Mr. Glendening was nothing more than a liaison with the police force on budget matters.
NEWS
February 15, 1998
IT IS NO SECRET that independent counsel Kenneth W. Starr's fishing expedition into President Clinton's private life has ridiculed, humiliated and trivialized this nation before the eyes of the world and its own citizens. But that is hardly the end of it.All of it is new ground, everything a precedent. So look carefully. In this massive dragnet for sexual peccadilloes -- faintly disguised as a hunt for the crime of perjury in a civil lawsuit that involves a fishing expedition for sexual material -- Mr. Starr's prosecutors have transformed relationships in government.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 29, 1995
The previews you are about to read are true. The names have not been changed, since there are no innocent. On Dec. 29, "Dragnet" is pulled off the Nick-at-Nite schedule. In a few paragraphs, the results of that decision.* "Great Performances" (9:30 p.m.-11 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- Hear the works of the man who is possibly America's greatest living Broadway lyricist, as Betty Buckley, Glenn Close, Bill Irwin, Madeline Kahn and others join together for "Sondheim: A Celebration at Carnegie Hall."
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