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By Kevin Sherrington and Kevin Sherrington,Dallas Morning News | October 28, 1990
DALLAS -- Drag racing, its proponents say, is no longer back alley. The sport has gone Main Street. And mainstream. Figures supplied by the National Hot Rod Association show attendance is up, especially among women, and no longer is it the sole province of latent teen-agers, either.What NHRA officials lack, however, is a proper impetus for the new image. They have narrowed it to two possibilities. But it still comes down to a question of which came first:Toilets or TV?Billy Meyer has no doubts.
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By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2012
Kyle Lear was a freshman soccer player trying out for the JV team at Arundel High when he had to make a choice between continuing in the sport or devoting his weekends to another of his longtime passions: racing cars. Soccer lost out. "They asked me to show up on a Saturday, and I told them I couldn't ," said Lear, who said he was racing. . "They thought I was joking. " For as long as Lear, who is now 25 years old, can remember, weekends have been devoted to racing. It began when he was 4 years old and Lear would race Big Wheels down the various tracks between his father's dirt car races in Southern Maryland, Virginia and Pennsylvania.
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NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
A man whose car killed two people in 2009 on a section of highway known for drag racing was found guilty Friday of two counts of manslaughter. Donneil Raeburn, 27, who was injured in the crash of his Chevrolet Impala in the early hours of June 21, 2009, when it rammed into the two pedestrians and another car as it raced west on Interstate 70, could receive a maximum of 20 years in prison at sentencing. Baltimore County Circuit Judge Patrick Cavanaugh, who presided over Raeburn's bench trial, did not schedule a sentencing date pending arrangements for a pre-sentence investigation of the defendant, who remains in custody with no bail set. The judge also found Raeburn guilty of several lesser charges, including reckless driving, failure to control his speed and driving under the influence of alcohol.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2011
Gary Nixon, an Andarko, Okla., native, was on his way to becoming a respectable baseball player when he was conked in the head by a teammate's swinging bat, and decided he better find a safer sport. He turned to drag racing and was a champion racer by age 15. He had gotten his license a year earlier. Nixon then abandoned that sport and began racing motorcycles professionally, and by 1958, was Oklahoma State Scrambles Champion. He was 18. Sharp-eyed readers like Jim Holechek, a retired Baltimore public relations executive and author who was a longtime friend of Nixon's and a motorcycle riding buddy, saw an item in last weekend's Baltimore Sun sports section reporting the Motorcycle Hall of Famer's death.
SPORTS
By J. A. Martin | March 31, 1991
What do Easter eggs and drag racing have in common? They both will be featured at Mason-Dixon today. The Washington County track hosts both, with the racers having a full program of racing in all classes.Next Sunday, NHRA Championship drag racing returns with a full program. Points earned now will establish who is favored for the season's title.On March 17 Roger Lewis of Bunker Hill, W.V., took the Super Pro title at Mason-Dixon with his '75 Vega. Dave Churchey of Boonsboro won in Heavy class while Terry Smith of New Oxford, Pa., took the Cycle title.
NEWS
By Stanley C. Dillion | July 12, 1992
Scott Lowman of Woodbine never had a serious desire to race.He spent time with his friends at the drag tracks and raced his car a couple of times down the quarter-mile when he turned 16. Occasionally he helped his friends, but he never had a real desire to join them.Instead, he raced three- and four-wheelers, but gave that up as it became more difficult to find places to ride. He turned his attention from motorsports altogether when he got married and started a family.But three years ago, Lowman decided to do a little drag racing.
NEWS
By Stanley C. Dillon | March 22, 1992
An integral part of drag racing has always been experimentation.To go faster, the racer is constantly working on his car to obtain the maximum performance.Willie Fair, a 23-year-old Westminster resident, uses drag racingto test the performance of his car.He does not race for points or trophies, he races because he loves it. He also races to get as much speed as possible out of his car, trying to go as fast as possible with a street-legal car.Fair's car is a 1968 Chevrolet Camaro Rally Sport, a so-called muscle car that was an outgrowth of America's fascination with drag racing's quarter-mile acceleration competitions.
SPORTS
By Stanley Dillon and Stanley Dillon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 12, 1995
Ron Little has been involved in motor sports for more than 20 years.He has been a builder, mechanic and driver in both oval track and drag racing. The versatile Westminster native has just finished building a new dragster that may revolutionize how future cars are built.Little used his past experience in dirt oval track racing to build his dragster. While the conventional long sleek dragster does not have any suspension, Little's prototype does.His new design has a four-link coil-over suspension system with shock absorbers.
SPORTS
By STAN DILLON | May 1, 1994
Jim Peddicord is a classic example of how a person can become hooked on drag racing. It wasn't until four years ago that he started attending 75-80 Dragway in Monrovia.Peddicord, 39, returned several times to the dragway after his initial visit to learn more about the sport. Now, he is a regular.After weeks of watching, he decided to try a couple of runs down the track in his pickup truck.A longtime friend, Larry Hoff of Westminster, warned Peddicord how contagious the sport is. Hoff should know, he has been a fixture at 75-80 for years and has helped a lot of his relatives and friends get started in drag racing.
SPORTS
By STAN DILLON | May 7, 1995
Whenever 75-80 Dragway is racing, you can count on Kenny Hill being there. The 24-year-old Gamber resident has been a regular competitor since he switched to drag racing two years ago after riding ATV four-wheel motorcycles in moto-cross competition for a few years."
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2011
A man whose car killed two people in 2009 on a section of highway known for drag racing was found guilty Friday of two counts of manslaughter. Donneil Raeburn, 27, who was injured in the crash of his Chevrolet Impala in the early hours of June 21, 2009, when it rammed into the two pedestrians and another car as it raced west on Interstate 70, could receive a maximum of 20 years in prison at sentencing. Baltimore County Circuit Judge Patrick Cavanaugh, who presided over Raeburn's bench trial, did not schedule a sentencing date pending arrangements for a pre-sentence investigation of the defendant, who remains in custody with no bail set. The judge also found Raeburn guilty of several lesser charges, including reckless driving, failure to control his speed and driving under the influence of alcohol.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2011
One of two spectators killed in a 2009 drag-racing accident on Interstate 70 was standing in a traffic lane, and not on the shoulder, an accident-reconstruction expert said Thursday in the driver's double-homicide trial. But under cross-examination from a prosecutor in Baltimore County Circuit Court, the defense's witness, Sal Fariello, conceded that the man could have been running from the car bearing down on him at about 84 mph. The victim was Jonathan Henderson, 20, who was struck and killed, as was his friend, Mary-Kathryn Abernathy, 21, who had been standing nearby as they watched an early-morning drag race near Security Boulevard in Woodlawn on June 21, 2009.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2011
In a halting voice, a 24-year-old Elkridge man recalled on Wednesday the sight of an approaching car as he watched a drag race almost two years ago, and how he had not realized until too late that the Chevrolet Impala was headed straight for him and his two friends. "Get out of the way!" Paul A. Duffy remembered screaming to his friends, an admonition that failed to save Mary-Kathryn Abernathy, 21, and Jonathan R. Henderson, 20, from the impact of the speeding Impala. Both died in the June 21, 2009, accident on Interstate 70 in Woodlawn, and Duffy suffered broken ribs and other injuries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
Baltimore Pride might be a celebration of gay rights and culture, but it's also an excuse to party. Hard. The event starts with a block party Saturday in Mount Vernon, the city's center for gay bars and clubs, and finishes with a festival in Druid Hill Park on Sunday. Whether you're strapping on some pumps for the High-Heel Race, walking in the parade or soaking in the live music, Pride has something for all stripes. It's a bold, brash and colorful way to spend a weekend. The intersection of Charles and Eager streets serves as the focal point for the festival, which is now in its 35th year.
NEWS
March 16, 2010
Anne Arundel County Police have identified the Pasadena man who was killed Sunday morning after he lost control of his car during a drag race and slammed into a tree. According to police, Stanley Johnson, 46, of the 4600 block of Mountain Road was traveling west on Route 100 near Catherine Avenue in his Chevy Camaro about 7:20 a.m. at the time of the accident. Police say he tried to start a race with another driver and swerved off the road just after accelerating. The victim was trapped inside the car, according to police.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | June 24, 2009
At Vince Sigismondi's Baltimore County apartment backing up to Interstate 70 near the city line, the early-morning hours on weekends frequently bring the sounds of drag racing. "I usually come out between 1 and 4, and smoke a couple cigarettes and exercise my leg a bit. I can sit out there and hear them doing the quarter-mile," the 51-year-old Army veteran said Monday. "I say, 'God help them if they hit something. ... They're finished.' " Early Sunday morning, as Sigismondi was dozing at his apartment off Ingleside Avenue, two lives came to an end on the lightly traveled stretch of I-70 inside the Beltway when an apparent drag race took a deadly turn.
SPORTS
By STAN DILLON | March 5, 1995
For more than 20 years, Bill Brown of Woodbine was a regular competitor on the oval track circuit until he retired in the mid-1980s.After sitting on the sidelines for 10 years, Brown, 53, has returned to racing. Instead of dirt track racing, he is doing a little drag racing in nostalgia events with cars he has restored."I raced Figure-8's at Dorsey Speedway and late models at Dorsey, Lincoln, Potomac, Hagerstown and Susquehanna speedways," Brown said. "I was beginning to slow down in the early '80s as racing became more expensive.
NEWS
By Mike Burns | June 14, 1998
Dead Man's Curve, it's no place to play.Dead Man's Curve, you best keep away.-- "Dead Man's Curve," 1964 LET ME ADMIT from the start that I've been in drag races. Never with much success, mind you, but familiar enough with the ways of this burn-and-peel auto competition. I once took part in an illegal drag on a side road that other kids had deliberately blocked off for these races.But mostly my drag-strip experience was limited to official raceways where they have the Christmas-tree staged lights, the pervasive smell of burning rubber, the straightaway measured quarter-mile, and the unforgiving electronic timer that often contradicts the barroom braggadocio of muscle-car owners.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,richard.irwin@baltsun.com | June 22, 2009
State police continue their investigation into the deaths of two people and the critical injuries to two others who had gathered for a drag race on Interstate 70 near the Baltimore County-Baltimore City line in Woodlawn early Sunday. Pronounced dead at the scene were Mary-Kathryn Michele Abernathy, 21, of the 8600 block of Hayshed Lane in Columbia, and Jonathan Robert Henderson, 20, of the 1400 block of Redwood Circle in La Plata, Charles County. Injured and reported in critical condition at Maryland Shock Trauma Center were Donneil Raeburn, 26, of the 4500 block of Dresden Road in Pikesville, and Paul Alan Duffy, 22, of the 8100 block of Sunrise Lane in Elkridge, Howard County.
NEWS
July 12, 2008
A national drag-racing league announced yesterday that it has donated $60,000 worth of tickets to the Kennedy Krieger Institute's spinal cord injury center to help the Baltimore facility raise money. The American Drag Racing League gave 2,000 tickets to the International Center for Spinal Cord Injury for the league's July 25-26 event at Maryland International Raceway in Mechanicsville. The tickets typically sell for $30, but the spinal cord center is selling them for $10. Dr. John W. McDonald, director of the center, said in a statement that such private donations are "critically important" to help the center develop therapies to help people recover from paralysis.
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