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Draft Lottery

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By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Staff Writer | May 18, 1992
SECAUCAS, N.J. -- Scratch Shaquille O'Neal from Washington's winter sports scene. And also remove Alonzo Mourning, Christian Laettner and Jimmy Jackson from the Bullets' list of possibilities.The Bullets' great expectations for the 1992-93 season were diminished when they finished with the sixth selection in the eighth NBA draft lottery conducted yesterday.Now, general manager John Nash and coach Wes Unseld, hoping to procure a legitimate center (O'Neal) or power forward (Mourning) to reverse the team's fortunes, might have to go in a new direction or consider a trade.
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By From Sun staff and news services | May 20, 2009
NBA Bryant's 40 lift Lakers; Clippers win draft lottery Kobe Bryant scored 40 points, including six free throws in the final 30 seconds, to lift Los Angeles to a 105-103 victory over the Denver Nuggets on Tuesday night after the Lakers trailed most of the game. Pau Gasol added 13 points and 14 rebounds and Derek Fisher had 13 points for the Lakers, who faced a seven-point deficit in the fourth quarter. Gasol's two free throws tied the game for the last time at 99 before Bryant went to the line, offsetting a three-pointer by Chauncey Billups and a free throw by J.R. Smith.
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SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1995
The NBA draft lottery is mostly about luck -- both good and bad. The Orlando Magic has had it, getting back-to-back No. 1 picks that produced Shaquille O'Neal and, ultimately, Anfernee Hardaway.The Washington Bullets hadn't until last year, when the fifth pick yielded Juwan Howard of Michigan. The Bullets are hoping their luck improves Sunday, when the NBA holds its lottery for the 1995 draft, scheduled for June 28 in Toronto."Hopefully, Chris Webber and Juwan Howard will bring us all the luck we need," said Bullets general manager John Nash, whose team has an 18.3 percent chance of picking first and will, according to the rules, choose no lower than fifth.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT and MILTON KENT,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2007
The NBA has taken some public relations hits of late, what with the nearly unwatchable Finals, "Big Shot" Robert Horry shot-putting Steve Nash into the scorer's table and Kobe Bryant's YouTube moments, but say this for the league: At least it can finish its draft in the same calendar year that it started (hello, NFL). Here's a primer on tonight's draft: Draft certainties We've pretty much known since Ohio State freshman Greg Oden and Texas freshman Kevin Durant declared themselves eligible for the draft that they would go first and second overall.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | March 5, 1991
How do we know that spring is near? We know because there is baseball being played. We know because those party-animal tax doctors are showing up on the tube with their pitches. We know because "Alf" is going into reruns and there isn't a thing we can do about it.We also know because the Bullets, those lords of the ordinary, are back in their usual predicament. It is a genuine rite of spring, happens every year. The NBA season moves toward a conclusion, and the Bullets find themselves in a position in which losing is preferable.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Sun Staff Writer | April 27, 1995
The Washington Bullets and Minnesota Timberwolves split the two games they played during the just-completed regular season. The two teams met again yesterday in a special blind draw to establish positioning in the draft lottery, and the Bullets came out victorious -- assuring themselves of the second position in the lottery and no worse than the fifth choice in the draft.The Bullets and the Timberwolves ended the season with 21-61 records, tying them for second worst in the league behind the Los Angeles Clippers.
NEWS
By Barry C. Steel | June 6, 1994
I WAS one of many veterans who returned to college from military service in the late 1960s, and I eventually came to oppose continued American involvement in Vietnam.Whatever our personal reasons for demanding American disengagement, those of us opposed to the Vietnam effort agreed that too many Americans had been maimed or killed without purpose. As we saw it, further casualties were unacceptable; we felt our efforts might save American lives.We were appalled when non-veteran college boys, some of whom had been the most vocal critics of the war, disappeared in droves from the anti-war movement when they received high numbers in the draft lottery or later when President Nixon eliminated the draft altogether.
NEWS
By Roberto Loiederman | August 25, 2004
HERE'S A RIDDLE: What do health insurance and the Vietnam War have in common? If you answered that they are both featured prominently in Sen. John Kerry's campaign, you're right, of course. But that's not the answer I have in mind. Let me explain. My older son - a Generation X rock-'n'-roller - recently accepted a regular job with benefits, even though he would have preferred to continue his hit-and-miss musical career, buttressed by tutoring gigs. So he now has a 9-to-5 job, as do many of his contemporaries who have made radical changes in their plans in order to get work with nonprofit corporations or with large companies or with the government.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Sun Staff Writer | May 22, 1994
Shaquille O'Neal. Alonzo Mourning. Larry Johnson. Chris Webber. Anfernee Hardaway. They're players you can't go wrong with, players you build franchises around.And all are players who have been selected among the top three picks of recent NBA drafts.This afternoon the Washington Bullets are hoping they can get their hands on an impact player as they try their luck at the NBA draft lottery. The 11 non-playoff teams will attempt to land one of the top three picks of the draft.The Bullets, with little luck since the draft lottery began in 1985, will throw a different spin into this year's proceedings.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT and MILTON KENT,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2007
The NBA has taken some public relations hits of late, what with the nearly unwatchable Finals, "Big Shot" Robert Horry shot-putting Steve Nash into the scorer's table and Kobe Bryant's YouTube moments, but say this for the league: At least it can finish its draft in the same calendar year that it started (hello, NFL). Here's a primer on tonight's draft: Draft certainties We've pretty much known since Ohio State freshman Greg Oden and Texas freshman Kevin Durant declared themselves eligible for the draft that they would go first and second overall.
SPORTS
By Helene Elliott and Helene Elliott,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 23, 2005
NEW YORK - It was a foregone conclusion that the NHL would ratify the collective bargaining agreement players had grudgingly swallowed, and the 30 governors lined up yesterday to welcome more cost controls than they'd dreamed of when commissioner Gary Bettman locked out players last Sept. 15. But with uncharacteristic boldness, the governors also took steps to energize a game that had withered long before labor woes dragged it out of sight and mind. On the first day of the rest of the NHL's life, Bettman ended the 310-day lockout and reopened the league for business today.
NEWS
By Roberto Loiederman | August 25, 2004
HERE'S A RIDDLE: What do health insurance and the Vietnam War have in common? If you answered that they are both featured prominently in Sen. John Kerry's campaign, you're right, of course. But that's not the answer I have in mind. Let me explain. My older son - a Generation X rock-'n'-roller - recently accepted a regular job with benefits, even though he would have preferred to continue his hit-and-miss musical career, buttressed by tutoring gigs. So he now has a 9-to-5 job, as do many of his contemporaries who have made radical changes in their plans in order to get work with nonprofit corporations or with large companies or with the government.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
When commissioner David Stern strides to the podium inside Madison Square Garden around 7:30 tonight, the Washington Wizards will know, for the first time in the franchise's 39-year history, the meaning of panic that usually accompanies having the first pick in the NBA draft. The Wizards, who won the draft lottery last month, are in the less-than-enviable position of going first, given that there are no candidates who have made their selection imperative. There is talent available, but the top players have so many question marks attached to them, and the Wizards have so many needs to address, that it's likely to lead to the kind of organizational consternation that may not go away for years.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht and Gary Lambrecht,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1999
Since they are not exactly well-stocked at the position, the Ravens could use a wide receiver like Peter Warrick. But even if the Florida State junior makes himself eligible for the NFL's supplemental draft, the Ravens stand a slim chance of landing the Seminoles star.Rumors began circulating recently that Warrick, whom league sources say would have been a top 10 pick in the April 17 draft, was considering entering the supplemental draft in mid-July. Warrick has since reiterated to reporters in Tallahassee that he will remain at Florida State to play his senior season.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun Staff Writer | May 19, 1995
The NBA draft lottery is mostly about luck -- both good and bad. The Orlando Magic has had it, getting back-to-back No. 1 picks that produced Shaquille O'Neal and, ultimately, Anfernee Hardaway.The Washington Bullets hadn't until last year, when the fifth pick yielded Juwan Howard of Michigan. The Bullets are hoping their luck improves Sunday, when the NBA holds its lottery for the 1995 draft, scheduled for June 28 in Toronto."Hopefully, Chris Webber and Juwan Howard will bring us all the luck we need," said Bullets general manager John Nash, whose team has an 18.3 percent chance of picking first and will, according to the rules, choose no lower than fifth.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Sun Staff Writer | April 27, 1995
The Washington Bullets and Minnesota Timberwolves split the two games they played during the just-completed regular season. The two teams met again yesterday in a special blind draw to establish positioning in the draft lottery, and the Bullets came out victorious -- assuring themselves of the second position in the lottery and no worse than the fifth choice in the draft.The Bullets and the Timberwolves ended the season with 21-61 records, tying them for second worst in the league behind the Los Angeles Clippers.
SPORTS
By From Sun staff and news services | May 20, 2009
NBA Bryant's 40 lift Lakers; Clippers win draft lottery Kobe Bryant scored 40 points, including six free throws in the final 30 seconds, to lift Los Angeles to a 105-103 victory over the Denver Nuggets on Tuesday night after the Lakers trailed most of the game. Pau Gasol added 13 points and 14 rebounds and Derek Fisher had 13 points for the Lakers, who faced a seven-point deficit in the fourth quarter. Gasol's two free throws tied the game for the last time at 99 before Bryant went to the line, offsetting a three-pointer by Chauncey Billups and a free throw by J.R. Smith.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2001
When commissioner David Stern strides to the podium inside Madison Square Garden around 7:30 tonight, the Washington Wizards will know, for the first time in the franchise's 39-year history, the meaning of panic that usually accompanies having the first pick in the NBA draft. The Wizards, who won the draft lottery last month, are in the less-than-enviable position of going first, given that there are no candidates who have made their selection imperative. There is talent available, but the top players have so many question marks attached to them, and the Wizards have so many needs to address, that it's likely to lead to the kind of organizational consternation that may not go away for years.
NEWS
By Barry C. Steel | June 6, 1994
I WAS one of many veterans who returned to college from military service in the late 1960s, and I eventually came to oppose continued American involvement in Vietnam.Whatever our personal reasons for demanding American disengagement, those of us opposed to the Vietnam effort agreed that too many Americans had been maimed or killed without purpose. As we saw it, further casualties were unacceptable; we felt our efforts might save American lives.We were appalled when non-veteran college boys, some of whom had been the most vocal critics of the war, disappeared in droves from the anti-war movement when they received high numbers in the draft lottery or later when President Nixon eliminated the draft altogether.
SPORTS
By Jerry Bembry and Jerry Bembry,Sun Staff Writer | May 22, 1994
Shaquille O'Neal. Alonzo Mourning. Larry Johnson. Chris Webber. Anfernee Hardaway. They're players you can't go wrong with, players you build franchises around.And all are players who have been selected among the top three picks of recent NBA drafts.This afternoon the Washington Bullets are hoping they can get their hands on an impact player as they try their luck at the NBA draft lottery. The 11 non-playoff teams will attempt to land one of the top three picks of the draft.The Bullets, with little luck since the draft lottery began in 1985, will throw a different spin into this year's proceedings.
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