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By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
At the start of Bram Stoker's 1897 novel "Dracula," a London lawyer named Harker visits Transylvania to facilitate a real estate deal for a mysterious count who desires new digs in England. Not anything freshly built, or even modestly rehabbed, mind you. Something old and crumbling will do fine, along the lines of the count's longtime castle, with its "dark window openings" and "frowning walls" that form "a jagged line against the sky. " Harker has found just the thing, he tells the count, an "ancient structure, built of heavy stones," a property that "has not been repaired for a large number of years" and has many trees that "make it in places gloomy.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 28, 2013
At the start of Bram Stoker's 1897 novel "Dracula," a London lawyer named Harker visits Transylvania to facilitate a real estate deal for a mysterious count who desires new digs in England. Not anything freshly built, or even modestly rehabbed, mind you. Something old and crumbling will do fine, along the lines of the count's longtime castle, with its "dark window openings" and "frowning walls" that form "a jagged line against the sky. " Harker has found just the thing, he tells the count, an "ancient structure, built of heavy stones," a property that "has not been repaired for a large number of years" and has many trees that "make it in places gloomy.
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FEATURES
By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 20, 1997
The first thing you need for a story ballet is a compelling reason to tell the story in dance.This is not the only element missing from Ballet Theater of Annapolis' "Dracula," but it's the most important one.For much of the new ballet, created in observance of the 100th anniversary of Bram Stoker's Victorian thriller, choreographer Edward Stewart hasn't made enough dance steps to fill up the music. Nor has he paid very much attention to the novel, as you can tell from such gaffes as Dracula's death.
NEWS
June 8, 2012
'Moonlight and Magnolias' Comedy about the writing of the movie script for "Gone with the Wind" runs through June 30 at the Colonial Players, 108 East St. in Annapolis. Performances are at 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays, with a 7:30 p.m. performance Sunday, June 17. Tickets are $20 and $15 and can be purchased at thecolonialplayers.org or by calling 410-268-7373. Reunion notice A half-century has passed since Baltimore's City College graduated more than 600 young men in 1962, and a reunion is being planned for Oct. 13. Organizers are trying to contact every class member but haven't found everybody.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | October 11, 1990
"Dracula . . . the Musical?", currently being staged at the Spotlighters Theatre, is a cute cartoon of a show. A melodramatic parody of the old story about the bloodthirsty count from Transylvania seeking new prey in the English countryside, this version is purely cornfed with laughable lyrics and lightweight music.The work is also a burlesque of the mystery play form. Playwright Rick Abbot has added a couple of new characters and deleted others. A saucy maid named Nelly jokes with the audience in an overly long prologue.
FEATURES
By Los Angeles Times | January 27, 1992
HOLLYWOOD -- Director Francis Ford Coppola wants to make it quite clear that his Dracula movie is unlike any other Dracula movie. He's calling it "Bram Stoker's Dracula," and claims it is the only film version that offers the complete story from the 1897 Stoker novel of the vampire count, which has been made into scores of movies through the years.Coppola's film, which is finishing up shooting on the Columbia lot, stars Gary Oldman as Count Dracula, Winona Ryder as Mina and Anthony Hopkins as Van Helsing in a particularly erotic telling of the Dracula legend.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | December 22, 1995
Maybe this film should be called "Mel Brooks, Dead and Loving It."Written off by a generation of movie critics that thinks "Nixon" is a great movie, he's recovered enough of the form that made him so beloved in the '70s and '80s. No one in any semblance of a right mind would confuse "Dracula, Dead and Loving It" with "Young Frankenstein" or "The Producers," but it's easily his best movie since then.Brooks seems to have made up his mind who he is. He's not imitating his imitators any more, he's back to imitating himself, always a sound career move.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 23, 1998
For the second Halloween season in a row, the Ballet Theater of Annapolis is staging "Dracula" at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis.The ballet, a modernized interpretation of Bram Stoker's horror tale, will feature Chinese dancer Zhirui Zou this fall, making her debut as a principal dancer with the Annapolis company in a new role as the monster's jealous bride.Zou, a Beijing resident considered one of China's finest dancers, is spending a year in Annapolis.The ballet tracks Dracula -- danced by Dmitry Tuboltsev, a Bolshoi dancer who joined the company and tackled the role last year -- from his birth through his death.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | July 2, 1993
In Charles Nolte's adaptation of "Dracula" at Totem Pole Playhouse, ominous music accompanies the title character; tinkly romantic chords accompany Mina, his intended victim; a patently fake bat flies across the stage on a pulley and string; and there's an amusing smattering of corny lines. ( Asked whether a specialist can help Mina, her father replies: "I'd stake -- my life on it.")Nolte's script, which is receiving its East Coast premiere, is part comedy, part romance, part melodrama and, of course, part horror story.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 16, 2002
A Hollywood legend died on Aug. 16, and it wasn't Elvis. But it was somebody who remains almost as recognizable as Elvis, if not nearly as famous. Bela Lugosi, the Romanian-born actor who played Dracula in the 1931 film version and continues to embody the world's most famous bloodsucker even seven decades later, died on Aug. 16, 1956, at age 73. His best years long past, his health eaten away by a drug dependency he had only recently shaken, the impoverished...
NEWS
May 25, 2012
'Moonlight and Magnolias' Comedy about the writing of the movie script for "Gone with the Wind" runs June 8-30 at the Colonial Players, 108 East St. in Annapolis. Performances are at 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays, with a 7:30 p.m. performance on June 17. Tickets are $20 and $15 and can be purchased at thecolonialplayers.org or by calling 410-268-7373. Book sale Thousands of books, videotapes, and miscellaneous items will be on sale Saturday-Sunday, June 2-3, at 1718 Urby Drive in Crofton.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case | May 10, 2011
Odd Future Wolf Gang Kill Them All head honcho Tyler, the Creator has reason to celebrate: Today is May 10, better known to him and the increasingly rabid OF fanbase (e.g. Sonar had to move next Thursday's OF show to its main room) as the release date of Goblin , Tyler's XL Recordings follow-up to his first, self-released album, Bastard . On the Internet, Goblin's release is a big deal — expect thousands and thousands of words on "What It Means" in the coming weeks — and it remains to be seen if that will translate to mainstream success.
TRAVEL
By Dave Rosenthal and Dave Rosenthal,dave.rosenthal@baltsun.com | December 13, 2009
"Dracula is Dead," a new travel literature book by Sheilah Kast and James C. Rosapepe, provides an updated look at post-Communist Romania. It draws on their experience in the Eastern European country: From 1998 to 2001, Rosapepe served as the U.S. ambassador to Romania (he now is a Maryland state senator); Kast is the host of "Maryland Morning" on WYPR (88.1 FM). We asked the husband-wife duo about their travels: Question: : What was your first memorable impression of Romania, and did it match what you had heard and read about the country?
FEATURES
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | November 10, 2009
Ask the average American about Romania, and the response would probably involve orphans, Olympic gymnasts or Dracula. Dispelling these common yet one-dimensional views of the country was, in large part, the inspiration for "Dracula is Dead," a new travel literature book by Sheilah Kast and James C. Rosapepe. The book, which will be released Monday, is a thoroughly researched yet conversational tour through the often-overlooked Eastern European country. "We had the opportunity to live there for three years and travel all over the country," Rosapepe said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | October 30, 2008
Tomorrow night after the kiddies trot home with their bulging candy bags, it's playtime for us adults. Not only is it Halloween - it's Friday night. That means double the tricks and treats for the taking - from Halloween-themed concerts to costume contests with cash prizes. You just have to know where to look. Here are some of the best options for Halloween revelry in and around the city. 1 How could Halloween night in Fells Point not be No. 1 on our list?
TRAVEL
By Raven Smith | October 26, 2008
Halloween is creeping closer, and it won't be long before little ghosts and goblins hit the streets in search of sweet treats. But for a more historical All Hallow's Eve this year, skip the candy trail and head straight to the home of Dracula himself: Romania. Despite being the birthplace of the spooky figure, Romania is one of Europe's most beautiful countries, with charming villages and rich Carpathian mountain scenery. Here are five things to do: 1 Explore Bran Castle : Don't let the name fool you: This is indeed Dracula's castle.
NEWS
By Judith Green | October 16, 1997
In a photograph of Dmitry Tuboltsev in costume for the title role in Ballet Theater of Annapolis' "Dracula," his face is painted with shadows that look almost like bruises. Deborah Harris, BTA's general manager, jokes: "It just shows what dealing with the INS can do to you."The manager and the dancer have gotten to know more about the Immigration & Naturalization Service than either ever wanted.Tuboltsev's dance career zigged and zagged in the former Soviet Union because of internal work permits.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,Contributing Writer | February 24, 1995
If you could live forever, what would you do with your life?"You'd have time to do everything you want to and get good at it," suggested Shana Burdick, a 21-year-old Western Maryland College senior and theater and communications major.Eternal life is the basis for "Dr. Frankenstein's Dracula," an original workshop play that will be performed today, tomorrow and March 2-4 in Dorothy Elderdice Theatre in WMC's Alumni Hall.The play, produced by Ira Domser, the college's director of theater, combines elements of Bram Stoker's "Dracula" and Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein."
NEWS
November 7, 2007
ISSUE: In his first year living at Government House in downtown Annapolis, Gov. Martin O'Malley took the sedate route in Halloween decorating: two ghosts and a scarecrow, hay bales, cornstalks, a pair of leaf wreaths, mums. Under O'Malley's predecessor in the mansion, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., the capital became an inflatable nation. A giant blow-up pumpkin, an air-filled Dracula, tombstones, giant eyeballs and many other holiday trimmings blanketed the front lawn. YOUR VIEW: As the Christmas season decorating extravaganza nears, what kind of decorations do you prefer outside the governor's mansion?
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