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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
Mari Luna Bistro, located on Cathedral Street across from Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, has closed. The restaurant closed officially on Jan. 21 after three years of operation. It was operated by the Luna family, which continues to run the two Pikesville-area restaurants -- Mari Luna Mexican Grill and Mari Luna Latin Grille.    The Cathedral Street restaurant was temporarily closed by the Baltimore City Health Department from Nov. 22 to Nov. 26 because of "rat infestation" and "unsanitary conditions," according to the department's website . An employee at Mari Luna Latin Grille confirmed the downtown closing but offered no explanation.
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NEWS
By Laurie Schwartz | September 14, 2009
In 1984, downtown Baltimore was a very different place than it is today. After reaching its pinnacle in the 1940s, Baltimore began to witness a decline in population, employment and investment that continued well into the next four decades. The downtown area was no exception. Despite successful efforts to redevelop Charles Center and the Inner Harbor, much of the area outside of these districts remained unchanged. Vacant storefronts along Charles Street were the norm. Graffiti and other signs of vagrancy were increasing.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington | November 4, 2006
Baltimore police are looking for whoever fatally stabbed a man downtown yesterday morning. The stabbing occurred at 11:40 a.m. at Jasper and Mulberry streets, according to police. The victim was taken to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he was pronounced dead. Police did not release his identity last night. Police said they are looking for a red midsize sport utility vehicle with damage on the passenger side in connection with the incident.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2010
The Annapolis City Council voted Monday night to allow more downtown bars and restaurants to stay open until 2 a.m., overturning a nearly 20-year-old policy that critics decried as unfair. The council approved the measure 6 to 3, with Mayor Joshua J. Cohen voting against it. The new law strikes down a 1994 policy that prohibits restaurants that serve alcohol from remaining open beyond midnight. Businesses that already had a 2 a.m. license at that time were grandfathered in, which critics argued gave those establishments an improper advantage.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 5, 2012
A 32-year-old man is in critical condition after being attacked in the middle of the day on a downtown Baltimore street, according to his family and police.  John Mason has been hospitalized since Friday in an induced coma with three skull fractures as a result of the attack, which police believe occurred at about 2 p.m. on Friday at Lombard and Howard streets, near the Bromo Seltzer tower. Mason's aunt, Christina Jasi, said he had shoe prints bruised into his head. Police said that witnesses said Mason was attacked by a group of four to five males.
NEWS
January 29, 1992
Ever since successful suburban shopping malls began strangling downtown retail districts, urban merchandising gurus have been itching for revenge. But although intriguing strategies have been developed, most have fallen flat on their face. Take pedestrian malls, for example. Two decades ago, they were touted as the prescription that would bring well-heeled customers back to downtown shopping areas throughout the nation. In most places, that never happened.The pedestrian mall concept was essentially an attempt to hide a larger problem with a Band Aid patch.
NEWS
December 17, 1991
In just a few months, downtown Baltimore will be spotlighted in a way it has not seen for years. The new stadium will be ready at Camden Yards, so will a new Veterans Administration hospital on Greene Street. And years of barricaded existence will end on Howard Street, when state-of-the-art light-rail trains begin moving along Howard Street.These changes are likely to bring visitors to areas of downtown they have not seen for quite a while. But this holiday season is a good time for early-birds to take a look at some of the happenings that have taken place from Cross Street Market to Mount Royal Avenue in recent months.
NEWS
By FRANKLIN MASON | December 21, 1991
He went Downtown the other way.He said it with the capital D because that was what it was to him, or once was. He went to the very heart, the center of Downtown, to Howard and Lexington Streets.He hadn't realized it until he was there, standing on the corner. He hadn't realized what it meant to him. It had to do with childhood, with youth.He remembered the day after Thanksgiving a half-century and more ago. It was the Downtown day for children, the day of no school, of Santa in stores, and the toys shining.
NEWS
October 29, 1994
The big day is almost here.In just a few more days, the gilded Maryland National tower -- now renamed after its new owner, NationsBank -- will be lit up. An Art Deco gem will be illuminated as never before.There is more to come:On New Year's Eve, the World Trade Center overlooking the Inner Harbor will become a giant, permanent candle, when its 28-story tower will be bathed in light. On a clear night, it ought to be visible for up to 10 miles, serving as a lighthouse to those approaching Baltimore.
NEWS
January 13, 1994
It is not an exaggeration to say that the Annapolis Historic District Commission has been holding the heart of the city in the palm of its hand. Had the commission refused to approve plans to expand the Anne Arundel County courthouse and thus keep it downtown, it would have drained the lifeblood from that heart.The commission delayed long enough to make us worry. In the end, though, it did the right thing, allowing the county to proceed with the $43 million expansion before County Executive Robert R. Neall leaves office and his successor gets a chance to move the courthouse elsewhere.
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