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BUSINESS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | June 27, 1992
The new Oriole Park baseball stadium is a hit with downtown hotels.Although precise figures are not available, hotel managers say the stadium has boosted business, which had been lagging because of the recession and flattening of the convention business."
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore | February 3, 2014
The owner of an aging downtown Baltimore hotel hopes to breathe new life into the property with a gritty, cool makeover that incorporates graffiti, sleek, white couches and a chain link fence. The multi-million dollar upgrade of the Brookshire Suites at Calvert and Lombard streets gives a new street twist to the 1958 building, which began as a parking garage but has been a hotel since the 1980s. Modus Hotels saw an opportunity to stand out in Baltimore, which has traditionally been dominated by big names with conventional reputations, such as Hilton, Marriott and Hyatt, said Aaron Katz, CEO of the Washington, D.C.-based owner of 11 hotels.
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NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Sun reporter | November 20, 2007
Bulky televisions - gone. Floral bedspreads - out of the picture. Desks where you plug in your laptop - so yesterday. Touches once found in the best hotels are going by the wayside in downtown Baltimore. The biggest hotels are spending millions of dollars to update and upgrade, to cater to tech-savvy guests and compete in a radically shifting hotel landscape. Hotels are going wireless in the guestrooms, smoothing "popcorn" ceilings, installing flat-screen computer monitors to double as TVs and making bedding more luxurious and lobbies more inviting.
NEWS
By Stephanie Rawlings-Blake | September 16, 2013
Three years ago, I declared that the Grand Prix of Baltimore would be a game changer for our city. Now that the race has ended for the foreseeable future, many have asked if I regret that statement. The answer is no. My goal in supporting the Grand Prix was to boost Baltimore's tourism industry over a traditionally slow Labor Day weekend and to present a positive image of our city to the world. For three years, the Grand Prix of Baltimore did exactly that. Race On, the race's organizers, positioned the Grand Prix for long-term success, and it is bittersweet to see this event come to an end. The Grand Prix attracted national and international exposure - shining a positive spotlight on Baltimore and broadcasting images of our beautiful harbor and downtown business district to households across the globe.
NEWS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Staff Writer | August 3, 1993
Representatives of BUILD abruptly walked out of a meeting with downtown Baltimore hotel managers yesterday, saying the officials were resisting the community group's efforts to gather information regarding the pay and career opportunities the hotels offer their employees.In a news conference held in the lobby of the Legg Mason tower, representatives of Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development (BUILD) said they were tired of being "slow-danced" by managers of the eight major downtown hotels and would go directly to workers for the information.
NEWS
By Howard P. Rawlings | August 7, 1995
WITH THE RECENT uproar over management of the city's convention bureau, an important related matter received little attention. It was a historic commitment by the major downtown hotels and restaurants to ensure that more Baltimore City residents share in the fruits of the tourism industry.Long after the battle of wills between Mayor Kurt Schmoke and the leaders of the Baltimore Area Convention and Visitors Association becomes a little-remembered footnote in the city's history, the tourism industry's agreement with state and city officials will be benefiting local residents.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | December 4, 1993
In an effort to break an impasse between the BUILD organization and downtown hotels, the chairman of the House Appropriations Committee is calling for a "summit" on the future of Baltimore's hospitality industry.Talks between Baltimoreans United in Leadership Development and downtown hoteliers over pay, benefits and career advancement in the industry broke down last summer."The time has come for all of us to move forward towards goals and solutions and away from accusations and threats," Del. Howard P. Rawlings, a Baltimore Democrat, said in a three-page proposal.
NEWS
May 1, 1998
THE APPROACHING summer tourism season is heaven, if you are a downtown hotel operator. Practically every room is booked between now and September. If you need a room, though, you could be in for a hellish experience.The situation promises to change. Not only has the City Council given final approval to a $40.9 million tax abatement and aid package to the 750-room Inner Harbor East Wyndham hotel, but it has also passed a bill that enables Baltimore to offer similar sweeteners to other hotel developers.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | March 4, 1998
For months, Baltimore leaders have been worrying whether there would be enough hotel rooms to handle the city's growing tourist industry. But now that another major downtown hotel project has unexpectedly surfaced, they are worrying that there might be too many rooms.Yesterday, after the disclosure that New York developer Harvey Schulweis plans to build a 600-room Westin Hotel across from the Inner Harbor without public subsidies, hotel industry analysts warned that a glut of hotel rooms could spell disaster for older, established hotels and the new hotels planned for downtown.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Staff Writer | November 22, 1993
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke told nearly 2,000 members of his political base yesterday exactly what they didn't want to hear: He said it was beyond his power to raise wages in the Inner Harbor area.The BUILD organization had heard much the same from Mr. Schmoke in an open forum more than five months ago, but its leaders did not press the grim-faced mayor, who has enjoyed the group's support in the past.It was only after Mr. Schmoke and City Council President Mary Pat Clarke, who also spoke briefly to the group at the Hyatt Regency, made quick exits yesterday that the Rev. Douglas I. Miles, a BUILD leader, unleashed an attack on the politicians.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 2, 2012
A 26-year-old Sacramento man was arrested by Baltimore police Saturday night as officers investigated the shooting of his girlfriend in a downtown hotel room near the Inner Harbor, records show. The circumstances of the shooting - which was reported at the Brookshire Hotel in the 100 block of E. Lombard St. - remained unclear Monday. Police said Saturday night that the shooting may have been self-inflicted or accidental, but have listed robbery as a possible motive.  Police said a sergeant was sitting in a marked patrol vehicle around 9:40 p.m. Saturday when the victim's boyfriend, Andrew Gasway, approached and said his girlfriend had been shot.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | May 31, 2012
A 51-year-old federal office worker was jumped and beaten by up to five juveniles Thursday morning in downtown Baltimore's Hopkins Plaza - an apparent random attack and the latest in a series of assaults in the heart of the city. Police are also investigating a fight that occurred at Charles and Lombard streets Wednesday morning and involved youths who may have been wearing school uniforms. Eight days ago, a group of youths stole candy and attacked the owner of a convenience store on Light Street.
NEWS
By Chris Jack Hill | May 9, 2012
Let's be honest and place Baltimore City's budgeting and spending problems into proper context. The lavish spending of public funds to fix up the offices of Jerome Oberlton, chief information officer for Baltimore City schools, is really nothing new. Neither is the recently announced closing of four Baltimore recreation centers. Frankly, the underprivileged children and families of Baltimore City are only too used to such things. Schools CEO Andrés Alonso called the spending by Mr. Oberlton a "bad judgment call," but the fact is, we have a governmental culture in this city that has a recurring history of similarly bad calls.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2012
Responding to growing demand for more apartments in downtown Baltimore, owners of the Tremont Plaza Hotel will start converting the all-suites property later this year into a mix of rental units and long-term guest suites, the hotel's developer said Monday. William C. Smith & Co. Inc. bought the St. Paul Place building in the early 1980s and transformed it from apartments and offices into a boutique hotel. But Smith has seen more demand for long-term stays and hopes to fill a niche for corporate assignments, said Carol Chatham, the company's vice president of marketing.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2011
Fireworks will light the sky over the Inner Harbor on New Year's Eve after a donation from The Baltimore Sun allowed organizers to meet their fundraising goal for putting on the annual display. The Sun will serve as presenting sponsor for the 34-year-old event, which seemed in peril after the previous sponsor, Ports America Chesapeake, declined to renew its contract this spring. "We're so excited to have this generous grant … since it allows the region to reap the economic advantages while preserving the tradition for local residents," Bill Gilmore, executive director of the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts, said in a statement.
SPORTS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
The inaugural Baltimore Grand Prix gave the local economy much of the boost officials hoped for — though organizers say they will seek to spread the benefits to more businesses next year. The street race helped pump up weekend revenues at a sampling of hotels by 44 percent compared with Labor Day weekend last year, according to preliminary counts. It also drove average room rates for those hotels up 55 percent and more than doubled the take at city-owned parking garages. The figures, compiled by the research firm Forward Analytics, were released Thursday by Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and Baltimore Racing Development, the private group that produced the three-day event.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2011
Fireworks will light the sky over the Inner Harbor on New Year's Eve after a donation from The Baltimore Sun allowed organizers to meet their fundraising goal for putting on the annual display. The Sun will serve as presenting sponsor for the 34-year-old event, which seemed in peril after the previous sponsor, Ports America Chesapeake, declined to renew its contract this spring. "We're so excited to have this generous grant … since it allows the region to reap the economic advantages while preserving the tradition for local residents," Bill Gilmore, executive director of the Baltimore Office of Promotion & the Arts, said in a statement.
NEWS
By Frank A. DeFilippo | February 18, 1993
PSSST! In case anyone bothers to ask, Baltimore's Convention Center is a silent industry that generates millions of dollars and thousands of jobs across the state.Though the center itself produces nearly $11 million a year in direct state taxes, the greatest benefits are the spin-offs to related businesses such as downtown hotels and restaurants and the vendors who supply them.Yet the xenophobes who oppose expansion of the 14-year-old center insist it's strictly a city project with no relationship to the rest of Maryland.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2010
Troy Timpel misses the tough old days, when tattoos were anything but respectable. "I liked getting the dirty looks from the old ladies back in the early '90s and late '80s," says Timpel, one of the organizers of this weekend's Tattoo Arts Convention at the Sheraton Baltimore City Center Hotel. "It's no longer the lowbrow biker, sailor, convict kind of thing that it was 20 years ago. Sadly, I think it's become socially reputable. " Still, one suspects Timpel isn't all that upset.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
The middle of August brings together a tourism trifecta: School won't start for another few weeks, baseball is still in full force and the football preseason is under way. Many people will find themselves staying in downtown hotels, visiting the Inner Harbor, catching a game and, yes, grabbing a drink at the hotel bar. Hotel bars are the odd uncles of the nightlife scene. They're often clean, streamlined and sterile, with pricy drinks. But the service tends to be better than your average corner bar, and when you're living a few floors up, the convenience can't be beat.
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