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NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,Staff Writer | July 29, 1992
Frank Guaragna comes to Annapolis not for crabs, but for cannelloni.His favorite place to eat at the harbor is Maria's Italian Ristorante, where he finds the home-cooked meals and friendly service worth the wait.The proprietor of Maria's, Maria Priola, greeted him and a dozen other regular customers with her usual smile Monday night. But in a different setting. The group was waiting in City Hall to testify on behalf of her expansion plans, not crowded around the bar waiting for a table.Ms.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2014
In two terms on the Baltimore City Council, William H. Cole IV has earned a reputation as an enthusiastic champion of downtown development. That history - and his close ties to the business community - make him a great choice to jump-start the Baltimore Development Corp., his many supporters say. "He understands the balance that's needed between business interests and community interests," says Aris Melissaratos, interim dean of the business school...
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NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Baltimore County is adding additional police officers and improving nighttime lighting as part of a public safety focus for new developments in Towson, including next month's opening of a 15-screen movie theater. With multiple projects sprouting in the county seat, County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said Friday that public safety is the priority. He sought to assure residents that the county can handle crowds expected to flock to downtown Towson for the new Cinemark theater and restaurants at Towson Square.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Baltimore County is adding additional police officers and improving nighttime lighting as part of a public safety focus for new developments in Towson, including next month's opening of a 15-screen movie theater. With multiple projects sprouting in the county seat, County Executive Kevin Kamenetz said Friday that public safety is the priority. He sought to assure residents that the county can handle crowds expected to flock to downtown Towson for the new Cinemark theater and restaurants at Towson Square.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2011
As their bus rumbled through housing projects and dilapidated schools and toward Harbor East — one of the crown jewels of Baltimore's revitalized waterfront — Zion Baptist Church Pastor Marshall Prentice asked his parishioners how they felt after hearing about the millions of tax breaks given to developers there. "I'm a teacher, and I'm really upset," said Linda Jones, 62, recalling the three-inch cockroaches that scurried through her school and the library that was shut down due to budget cuts.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
The master developer of Columbia's Town Center aims to begin construction by early next year on a $100 million apartment and retail complex, the area's first new housing in a decade. The Metropolitan Downtown Columbia will be a six-story, 380-unit development that the Howard Hughes Corp. plans to build in a joint venture with Kettler of McLean, Va., and Orchard Development of Ellicott City, on land next to The Mall in Columbia. Rents are expected to range from $1,600 a month for a one-bedroom apartment to $2,800 for a three-bedroom unit — making them among the highest in the region.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | September 10, 1990
A citizen's panel that is studying ways to guide downtown development over the next 20 years is likely to recommend that public officials seriously consider razing a mile-long stretch of the Jones Falls Expressway, and replacing it with a boulevard in order to create a large new development area.Members of the planning group also strongly favor the idea of reopening North Charles Street to two-way traffic, as it was before the 1950s, to increase activity along the street and make it more pleasant for pedestrians by slowing down traffic.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | February 21, 1991
If the 1960s and 1970s were decades when Baltimore grew as a business center, and the 1980s were years when it became a destination for tourists and conventioneers, then the 1990s will be "a decade in which we reinvent ourselves as a center of science and technology and higher education," the acting head of Baltimore's downtown development agency predicted yesterday.In one of his first public addresses since he was named acting head of Center City-Inner Harbor Development Inc., David M. Gillece said the effort to make downtown Baltimore a home for scientific and technological endeavors is a key part of a vision to guide downtown development over the coming decade.
BUSINESS
By Michael A. Fletcher and Michael A. Fletcher,Evening Sun Staff | November 8, 1990
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke today announced the appointment of David Gillece, president of Baltimore Economic Development Corp., as acting president of Center City-Inner Harbor Development Inc. and asked him to explore merging the two quasi-public development agencies.The move comes after the resignation of long-time Center City head Albert M. Copp, who left the agency in September after receiving harsh criticism from City Council members and others for the agency's allegedly secretive operating style and poor handling of several downtown development projects.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
An 18-hole miniature golf course on Rash Field, a 28-passenger "trackless train," a tethered balloon, a zip line and a variety of other outdoor-related activities are among nine proposals that aim to enliven Baltimore's Inner Harbor shoreline. The Baltimore Development Corp., which oversees downtown development for the city, received the bids after it issued a request for proposals from groups interested in adding family-oriented attractions to the Inner Harbor in time for the 2012 summer tourist season.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
This is one in a series of submitted candidate profiles for the Columbia Association Elections.  The Columbia Association will hold elections on Saturday, April 26. During the elections, Columbia residents who pay the Columbia Association assessed fee can vote in their respective village for their village's representative to the 10-member Columbia Council, which becomes the 10-member Board of Directors. Each village hosts its own election. This year, there are only three contested races for the 10-member board.
NEWS
April 25, 2013
Here we go again: City leaders want to invest more public dollars in the Inner Harbor ("Improving the city's 'playground,"' April 24). One would have thought had learned from the mistakes of the past. The Inner Harbor long has symbolized the wrong turn our city took in its economic development strategy. We have invested in high-profile projects that benefit a small segment of the population while neglecting ordinary residents and their neighborhoods. In 1970, before the Inner Harbor was redeveloped with enormous infusions of public money, 5.3 percent of Baltimore's housing units were vacant.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2012
John DeWolf III, the Howard Hughes Corp.'s senior vice president for development, is a tall man doing a big job from a large office in downtown Columbia. The floor-to-ceiling windows face Lake Kittamaqundi, and the conference table is covered with maps and plans for downtown development, a 30-year project to include new stores, homes, offices, hotels, transit lines, walking paths, renovations at Merriweather Post Pavilion — all in pursuit of James W. Rouse's original idea of a "real city.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
The master developer of Columbia's Town Center aims to begin construction by early next year on a $100 million apartment and retail complex, the area's first new housing in a decade. The Metropolitan Downtown Columbia will be a six-story, 380-unit development that the Howard Hughes Corp. plans to build in a joint venture with Kettler of McLean, Va., and Orchard Development of Ellicott City, on land next to The Mall in Columbia. Rents are expected to range from $1,600 a month for a one-bedroom apartment to $2,800 for a three-bedroom unit — making them among the highest in the region.
EXPLORE
January 23, 2012
As one who was told, by name, to "shut up and listen" by a fellow resident at the recent pre-submission meeting concerning GGP's plans for the mall, I feel compelled to comment on three portions of your article, "Mall plans draw tepid response" (Jan. 19). One: You claim that residents were "unconvinced at first that (GGP's) hands were tied" in terms of sharing more information about their plans. Actually, we continue to be unconvinced. Contrary to GGP's assertion, the county's development approval process clearly allows them to share whatever additional information they want to share about their plans.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2011
As their bus rumbled through housing projects and dilapidated schools and toward Harbor East — one of the crown jewels of Baltimore's revitalized waterfront — Zion Baptist Church Pastor Marshall Prentice asked his parishioners how they felt after hearing about the millions of tax breaks given to developers there. "I'm a teacher, and I'm really upset," said Linda Jones, 62, recalling the three-inch cockroaches that scurried through her school and the library that was shut down due to budget cuts.
NEWS
July 26, 1991
Mayor Schmoke apparently intends to move quickly on the recommendations a city task force on downtown development, whose report earlier this year contained literally hundreds of suggestions for revamping downtown Baltimore's economy. Though the suspicion inevitably arises that election-year politics may have played a part in Schmoke's sudden enthusiasm for getting Baltimore moving again, the task force in fact came up with some good ideas that deserve prompt action.The main problem will be how to coordinate the myriad suggestions of the task force with a comprehensive big picture scenario and how to set priorities for getting the job done.
NEWS
November 23, 2008
Put action on GGP plan for Columbia on hold As I read the newspapers about the General Growth Properties plan for downtown Columbia development and the reactions of Howard County government officials and Columbia Association officials to that plan, I feel like I must be living in a parallel universe. Hasn't anyone noticed that the entire world financial picture has changed? We are now in a recession that is worse than anything that has happened since the Great Depression. Stock markets and banks around the world are in a critical situation, and GGP's stock has fallen from $51 to less than $1 a share within the last year.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2011
An 18-hole miniature golf course on Rash Field, a 28-passenger "trackless train," a tethered balloon, a zip line and a variety of other outdoor-related activities are among nine proposals that aim to enliven Baltimore's Inner Harbor shoreline. The Baltimore Development Corp., which oversees downtown development for the city, received the bids after it issued a request for proposals from groups interested in adding family-oriented attractions to the Inner Harbor in time for the 2012 summer tourist season.
BUSINESS
By a Baltimore Sun reporter | July 21, 2010
Two office buildings in downtown Baltimore, both of which had been undergoing conversion to hotels, are scheduled to be sold at back-to-back foreclosure auctions next month. According to the website for Alex Cooper auctioneers, which is handling both sales, the first involves the former Keyser Building at 201-207 E. Redwood St., a 10-story structure that was being renovated to reopen as a 130-room Hotel Indigo. It will be offered for sale at an auction on the premises at 11:30 a.m. on Aug. 12. The Hotel Indigo was expected to open by early fall of 2009, but the work was never completed.
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