Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDowntown Dallas
IN THE NEWS

Downtown Dallas

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Michael Precker and Michael Precker,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 18, 1996
After years of long-distance friendship, the Colemans of England are visiting the Conaways of Texas for the first time, and the hosts are eager to show off Dallas, their hometown.First up on the tour is the big cattle sculpture at Pioneer Plaza."This is wonderful," says Ron Coleman, as he takes photographs of 40 oversized bronze longhorns moseying from a real, historic cemetery down a man-made hill under the watchful eyes of three oversize bronze cowboys."It's fantastic workmanship," says Coleman, a retired management consultant who lives in Hampshire.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Neal Peirce | June 10, 2001
CHICAGO - How did the downtown of this old Frostbelt city beat out its competitors to capture the headquarters of mighty Boeing, quintessential global mega-corporation of the 21st century? Simple, say insiders: Downtown Chicago has life. And not just its Miracle Mile, its stunning lakefront, its skyscrapers, 100,000-plus downtown residents and access to O'Hare International, one of the world's great airports. Chicago is also a 24-hour-a-day city with vital street life, an ethnically diverse population, great universities and a world-class assortment of professionals in virtually every field.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Neal Peirce | June 10, 2001
CHICAGO - How did the downtown of this old Frostbelt city beat out its competitors to capture the headquarters of mighty Boeing, quintessential global mega-corporation of the 21st century? Simple, say insiders: Downtown Chicago has life. And not just its Miracle Mile, its stunning lakefront, its skyscrapers, 100,000-plus downtown residents and access to O'Hare International, one of the world's great airports. Chicago is also a 24-hour-a-day city with vital street life, an ethnically diverse population, great universities and a world-class assortment of professionals in virtually every field.
FEATURES
By Michael Precker and Michael Precker,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | August 18, 1996
After years of long-distance friendship, the Colemans of England are visiting the Conaways of Texas for the first time, and the hosts are eager to show off Dallas, their hometown.First up on the tour is the big cattle sculpture at Pioneer Plaza."This is wonderful," says Ron Coleman, as he takes photographs of 40 oversized bronze longhorns moseying from a real, historic cemetery down a man-made hill under the watchful eyes of three oversize bronze cowboys."It's fantastic workmanship," says Coleman, a retired management consultant who lives in Hampshire.
NEWS
By Bob Moos and Bob Moos,Bob Moos is a columnist for the Dallas Morning News | September 10, 1991
Dallas -- I DUG INTO my pocket and gave a buck to a street person the other day. Does that make me a good Samaritan -- or a sucker?The disheveled fellow said he was hungry and needed some money for food -- a point that hit home with me since I was walking into a restaurant for lunch when he approached me. From what I could tell, the man seemed to be speaking the truth. He was hollow-eyed and haggard.Still, my momentary compassion came not without some skepticism. Only a week before, in virtually the same spot, a desperate-looking woman had asked me for a dollar or two. Her car, she explained, had just run out of gas and she needed to get home.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 23, 2006
HOUSTON -- Southern Methodist University has all but won the competition to host a $200 million George W. Bush presidential library. Officials announced this week that the school will be the "sole focus" of talks next month. That means the two other finalists - Baylor University and the University of Dallas - will wait on the sidelines as the selection committee enters what chairman Don Evans in a statement called the "next phase of deliberations." A final decision could come in late January or early February.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
Over the years, The Oranges Band frontman Roman Kuebler has amassed some hilarious, obscene and hilariously obscene stories. Several years ago, the band was on tour in Dallas when an argument broke out between then-bassist Tim Johnston and the rest of the group. Johnston stormed off, and when the rest of band woke up the next morning, he was nowhere to be found. Here is how the story played out, according to Kuebler: "We finally did get a call from him. He was in Little Rock, Ark., which was where our next show happened to be. We found out that in his altered and angered state he decided that he did not need anyone telling him what he could and could not do and, therefore, decided to go home to Baltimore.
NEWS
October 20, 2003
Preston E. Smith, 91, a former Texas governor known for his assortment of polka-dot ties and his old-fashioned electioneering, died Saturday in Lubbock. A Democrat elected to the first of two terms as governor in 1968, he relied on personal contacts, face-to-face campaigning and direct mail. Mr. Smith focused on education and criminal justice, pushing for the first comprehensive drug abuse program in Texas. He was also instrumental in passing the state's first minimum-wage law. When he ran for lieutenant governor the first time, then-Lt.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 1, 2002
DALLAS - It's 10 a.m. - time for coffee and maybe a smoke for dozens of office workers in downtown Dallas. But, wait, what's that dangling from the top of the 56-story Renaissance Tower? The blue speck swinging back and forth from a mountaineer's rope is just your friendly neighborhood Spider-Man performing a stunt to promote today's release of last summer's movie Spider-Man on video and DVD. The crowd of dozens quickly swelled to hundreds yesterday. Some of them, dressed in Halloween costumes they wore to work, added to the spectacle.
NEWS
February 23, 2003
GOV. ROBERT L. Ehrlich Jr. and his advisers, weighing whether to seek federal funds for an expanded Baltimore rail system, ought to get out of town - and visit some of the growing number of cities across the country using rail to leverage economic development. An extensive system - conveniently linking downtown Baltimore, city institutions and surrounding suburbs - would take commuters off congested roads and reduce pollution, of course. Just as critically, it would provide a wealth of new development opportunities across the region and add significant value to such city redevelopment efforts as the west-side renaissance and plans for an east-side biotechnology park.
NEWS
By Bob Moos and Bob Moos,Bob Moos is a columnist for the Dallas Morning News | September 10, 1991
Dallas -- I DUG INTO my pocket and gave a buck to a street person the other day. Does that make me a good Samaritan -- or a sucker?The disheveled fellow said he was hungry and needed some money for food -- a point that hit home with me since I was walking into a restaurant for lunch when he approached me. From what I could tell, the man seemed to be speaking the truth. He was hollow-eyed and haggard.Still, my momentary compassion came not without some skepticism. Only a week before, in virtually the same spot, a desperate-looking woman had asked me for a dollar or two. Her car, she explained, had just run out of gas and she needed to get home.
FEATURES
By Rick Sylvain and Rick Sylvain,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 14, 1993
In a Dallas museum called the Sixth Floor, visitors fight back tears.Eyes glazed, they move silently among photographs and TV monitors, reliving one of America's darkest days, then scrawling their emotions into the pages of a guest book.The Sixth Floor turns you inside out and reopens the raw, emotional wounds of that Friday in Dallas.Thirty years? Can it be nearly 30 years ago that the bulletin from Dallas jolted a disbelieving country?America had never known such youthful exuberance as John F. Kennedy's White House.
SPORTS
By Kevin B. Blackistone and Kevin B. Blackistone,Dallas Morning News | June 23, 1991
DALLAS -- Terry Murphy can't jam, but he was in one two Junes ago.His company, Streetball Partners Inc., was more than $250,000 in debt. Bankruptcy was a real threat.A lot of chief executives in such a situation might try to entice prospective investors over lunch. Or, better yet, during a round of golf or a doubles tennis match at some exclusive country club. Or maybe after a few games of racquetball at some fancy health club.Not Murphy. He headed to Roger Staubach's backyard basketball court, where he knew he could catch a few fat cats playing hoops.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.