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NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,sun reporter | February 13, 2007
The Westminster City Council voted unanimously last night to ban tattoo parlors from the downtown business district - a move to further its vision of a revitalized Main Street. "I think we're taking a pretty reasonable position," Councilman Gregory Pecoraro said before the voting. Council members stressed that the ban does not prevent tattoo parlors from operating in 70 percent of the commercial areas within the city limits, most of which extend along Route 140. Two tattoo businesses that opened downtown before the ban will be allowed to remain.
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NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 10, 2012
The jazz quartet's last tune of the lunchtime set at the Columbia lakeside took an up-tempo bebop turn, the sort of sound one might associate with things urban and urbane: the Village Vanguard, maybe Birdland. The band played before a sparse crowd seated on a grassy terraced slope, folks who would get into their cars and drive off through a place that looks much like a suburban office and shopping area with its wide boulevards, tidy lawns, neat rows of trees, and parking lots. Not quite urban.
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NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2000
Westminster Common Council voted unanimously to rezone downtown businesses at its meeting Monday. The new downtown business zone, developed as part of Westminster's comprehensive plan, is meant to reflect the idea that downtown businesses need different zoning requirements from those in suburban or heavily commercial and industrial areas. The downtown business zone is more restrictive than the business and restricted industrial zones it replaces. Only those types of businesses listed in the ordinance are allowed.
NEWS
By Kurt Schmoke, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 10, 2012
During my time in office, members of the downtown business community and other citizens urged me to take action against the area known as The Block. Since the end of World War II, The Block has been a concentration of strip clubs and X-rated bookstores. However, by the 1990s, The Block acquired a reputation for attracting people engaged in drug dealing, prostitution and other unsavory activity. Pressure mounted to close the last remaining block of what once was three blocks of sex-based entertainment.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Tom Pelton,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1999
While critics of Baltimore mayoral candidate Martin O'Malley have predicted he would be the "downtown mayor," focused mostly on helping developers, he was one of only four city councilmen who voted against a proposed $350 million redevelopment of downtown's west side.And while City Council President Lawrence A. Bell III describes himself as the mayoral candidate fighting for disadvantaged people, he sponsored the legislation that will allow the eviction of dozens of minority shop owners so developers can rebuild the Howard Street retail corridor.
BUSINESS
By ANDREA K. WALKER and ANDREA K. WALKER,SUN REPORTER | October 25, 2005
Gage World Class Mens Wear has dressed some of Baltimore's most visible men over the years. Kweisi Mfume, U.S. Senate candidate and former president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and congressman, said he gets 95 percent of his wardrobe from the retailer. Delicatessen owner Marc Attman got his first suit there, a green one, at age 9. And Kurt L. Schmoke frequented the downtown location when he was mayor of Baltimore from 1987 to 1999 and later when he resumed the practice of law. "I love that place," said Schmoke, now dean of the Howard University School of Law in Washington.
NEWS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1996
After years of suffering from a business exodus, Baltimore's downtown appears poised to recapture lost white-collar jobs and the sense of economic momentum that has been absent throughout the 1990s.The groundswell of activity, although preliminary in some cases, would bring hundreds of professional jobs downtown in the wake of corporate downsizings, bank consolidations, concerns over safety and a lack of economic development initiatives.The influx of jobs, along with high-profile public projects such as the $150 million Convention Center expansion, entertainment-oriented ventures such as the $27 million conversion of the abandoned Fishmarket to a children's museum and Cordish Co.'s planned $18 million renovation of the derelict Power Plant, might even contribute to major new development.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | April 28, 1999
Our Daily Bread soup kitchen, long criticized for drawing aggressive panhandlers and loiterers to downtown, will move to East Baltimore under a $10 million expansion plan announced yesterday by the Archdiocese of Baltimore.The announcement comes after nine months of debate between downtown business leaders and advocates for the city poor who wrestled over where the swelling Cathedral Street kitchen, which feeds up to 900 people a day, should be located.Under the new plan, Our Daily Bread will move to a vacant building at 400 E. Preston St., along the Jones Falls Expressway and incorporate the Christopher Place Employment Academy, now at 709 E. Eager St.The old Our Daily Bread site will continue to provide services to the poor while being occupied by My Sister's Place, a women and children's daytime shelter at 123 W. Mulberry St. that handles about 65 people.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | May 13, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- In Shane White, downtown business owners have had a dedicated leader.Next month, White will step down after three years as president of the Westminster Business Association."
NEWS
September 8, 1993
The conflict between the advocates for the rights of Baltimore's homeless and those concerned by some homeless persons' wrongs did not have to end up in a law suit. But of course it did.Last month a Washington law firm filed suit in federal court here against the city and the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore on ** behalf of the American Civil Liberties Union. The suit charges that the city's police officers and the partnership's public safety guides threaten and harass homeless persons on downtown streets even when those persons are in no way breaking laws or intimidating other citizens.
SPORTS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 4, 2011
Managers at the Pratt Street Alehouse tend to keep their expectations low for Labor Day weekend, typically a sleepy affair in the city. But not this year. Because the pub's outdoor dining patio sits just a few feet from Pratt Street, where open-wheeled racecars will speed past on their way around a 2-mile circuit in the inaugural Baltimore Grand Prix, managers are preparing for a full house — the kind of numbers generated by Opening Day for the Orioles or a Ravens-Steelers football game.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2011
Weeks of cold and dreary weather seemed to melt away in the sunshine at Oriole Park on Sunday as groundskeepers and their mowers filled the air with the fragrance of fresh-cut grass and laid down a crisp diamond pattern on the emerald turf. It was the next-to-last cutting before the season's home opener at 3:05 p.m. Monday. And head groundskeeper Nicole Sherry was there to make sure the place looks its best by the time the players and fans arrive. "We'll put the finishing touches on the home opener logo [the painted insignia at home plate]
NEWS
By David E. Johnson | March 18, 2011
I'm a firm believer in the original vision of James Rouse, William Donald Schaefer and Walter Sondheim of a vibrant downtown Baltimore. Our downtown business district is an integral part of that vision, which began nearly 50 years ago with the Charles Center-Inner Harbor renewal projects. The success of these projects and others helped transform the attitude of Baltimore's citizens toward their city. What once was a collective inferiority complex became a spirit of pride and accomplishment as Baltimore became a national model for other cities.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2010
Redwood Tower, two blocks north of Harborplace in downtown Baltimore, boasts spacious corner offices, harbor views, a brick-and-glass exterior and a unique perch atop a historic building. It also offers parking and access to shopping, restaurants and mass transit. What is missing, its managers say, are workers to fill the half-empty, 15-story building, which lost a key tenant when the state Department of Business and Economic Development moved out more than a year ago. The tower is one of many buildings in downtown Baltimore struggling with a high vacancy rate - a problem at the heart of criticism over plans for a $1.5 billion development project on the western edge of the Mount Vernon neighborhood.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,sun reporter | February 13, 2007
The Westminster City Council voted unanimously last night to ban tattoo parlors from the downtown business district - a move to further its vision of a revitalized Main Street. "I think we're taking a pretty reasonable position," Councilman Gregory Pecoraro said before the voting. Council members stressed that the ban does not prevent tattoo parlors from operating in 70 percent of the commercial areas within the city limits, most of which extend along Route 140. Two tattoo businesses that opened downtown before the ban will be allowed to remain.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | February 12, 2007
Community leaders, looking to inject new life into downtown Westminster by attracting youthful consumers from nearby McDaniel College, have looked enviously toward Baltimore's funky and thriving Hampden and Fells Point neighborhoods. They've even reached out to some of the eclectic shops in those trendy spots and invited them to open satellites in the historic Carroll County seat. But that effort, some critics fear, could be derailed tonight if the city council passes a proposed downtown ban on any more tattoo parlors - businesses that have become nearly as ubiquitous in campus towns as pizza parlors.
NEWS
By Gerard Shields and Gerard Shields,SUN STAFF | September 4, 1998
Plans to move Our Daily Bread's soup kitchen from downtown Baltimore are moving closer to fruition as Baltimore officials and downtown business leaders discuss possible relocation sites, including a former city school across from Green Mount Cemetery.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke said yesterday that he will meet later this month with a committee of business and civic leaders established to explore moving Our Daily Bread from Cathedral and Franklin streets near the Basilica of the Assumption. The Downtown Partnership, a group of business owners, has said that a half-dozen sites are being considered.
NEWS
By Donna R. Engle and Donna R. Engle,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1998
Business in downtown Westminster in the last three months of this year has been: (a) down the tubes; (b) about the same as in the final quarter of 1997; or (c) considerably better.The answer depends on which merchant makes the assessment.The departure of the Westminster post office, which moved from its historic site at 83 E. Main St. in August to the northern edge of the city, has hurt downtown retail businesses that depended heavily on people strolling by and stopping to look at merchandise.
BUSINESS
By ANDREA K. WALKER and ANDREA K. WALKER,SUN REPORTER | October 25, 2005
Gage World Class Mens Wear has dressed some of Baltimore's most visible men over the years. Kweisi Mfume, U.S. Senate candidate and former president of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and congressman, said he gets 95 percent of his wardrobe from the retailer. Delicatessen owner Marc Attman got his first suit there, a green one, at age 9. And Kurt L. Schmoke frequented the downtown location when he was mayor of Baltimore from 1987 to 1999 and later when he resumed the practice of law. "I love that place," said Schmoke, now dean of the Howard University School of Law in Washington.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY and JACQUES KELLY,SUN REPORTER | September 30, 2005
Frances B. Booke, who sold jewelry at a downtown business she owned for nearly 50 years and was also a proprietor of the old Marconi's restaurant, died of stroke complications Tuesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Mount Vernon resident was 88. Born Frances Berman in Baltimore and raised in Reservoir Hill, she was the daughter of Isaac Berman, a pawnbroker. Her brother, Dr. Edgar Berman, was a surgeon who wrote the 1976 bestseller, The Solid Gold Stethoscope. She was a 1935 graduate of Western High School and regularly attended class reunions.
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