Advertisement
HomeCollectionsDowntown Baltimore
IN THE NEWS

Downtown Baltimore

BUSINESS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,SUN STAFF | November 13, 1998
Boosted by a steady increase in investment and a rise in employment, optimism for downtown Baltimore is at an all-time high, according to an 18-month analysis of the area by the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore."
Advertisement
NEWS
By JILL ROSEN and JILL ROSEN,SUN REPORTER | October 19, 2005
Old Navy? Bed Bath & Beyond? Pottery Barn? By bypassing Baltimore, you national retail chains might be missing out. Downtown Baltimore has the population and the ready cash to make it one of the country's top 10 retail markets, according to a new study. A retail assessment commissioned by the city and area development organizations shows the wealthy, waterfront parts of town boast demographics that rival established urban markets such as Philadelphia, Boston and Washington. "I was surprised," Downtown Partnership President Kirby Fowler said of the results.
NEWS
By Matt Whittaker and Matt Whittaker,SUN STAFF | July 26, 2004
Just as drivers and pilots affectionately give female names to their sports cars or fighter jets, so has Josh Boyd christened the piece of machinery he operates daily. "Baby Girl" is the early-1920s vintage elevator he runs in the One East Lexington building. As long as the Atlantic Elevator Co. lift is maintained properly, he says, it runs better than modern ones. And it is more than just a conveyance. "It reminds people of yesterday," he says. "It reminds people of their youth." But these operator-run relics, like the telephone operators connecting calls with plugs at switchboards, are part of a bygone era. In 2002, at least nine remained in the metropolitan area.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | March 26, 1999
Older U.S. cities such as Baltimore might have little chance of re-emerging as primary hubs for big corporations, shopping districts and the middle class. But the future is far from dim.In the view of urban redevelopment expert Joel Kotkin, the comeback cities of the 21st century will succeed by distinguishing themselves from the suburbs -- not by trying to compete in areas such as manufacturing, technology and finance."Cities cannot go back to what they were in 1950," Kotkin said yesterday during a stop in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,Staff Writer | July 24, 1993
Travelers on Maryland Rail Commuter (MARC) trains should be prepared to reach deeper into their pockets starting Oct. 1, when the Mass Transit Administration proposes to raise base fares.The proposal, announced yesterday, calls for an increase of up to 19 percent. The fare for a one-way ticket would go up 25 cents, and a round-trip ticket would cost an additional 50 cents. For example, a one-way ticket for a trip from the MARC station in Aberdeen to Union Station in Washington would increase from $7.25 to $7.50, while a round-trip ticket would increase from $13.00 to $13.50.
NEWS
By Lane Harvey Brown and Lane Harvey Brown,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2003
As relatives of a Harford County girl killed in a hit-and-run accident held each other and cried quietly, a 23-year-old Mexican national pleaded innocent yesterday to charges arising from the March incident in downtown Baltimore. Guillermo Diaz of the 400 block of Bigley Ave. in Halethorpe entered his plea on charges of vehicular manslaughter in the death of Annie Cumpston and attempted first-degree murder through an interpreter before Baltimore Circuit Judge Wanda K. Heard. If convicted, Diaz could receive life in prison for the attempted-murder charge and 10 years for the vehicular manslaughter charge.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | September 16, 1999
THE WEST SIDE of downtown Baltimore appears likely to become Maryland's newest federally designated historic district.After listening to nearly three hours of testimony Tuesday night, Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation voted 4-1 to support the nomination of a 24-block section of downtown to the National Register of Historic Places.As a result of CHAP's action, the nomination will be sent to a state preservation panel, the Governor's Consulting Committee, for consideration.
BUSINESS
By Sean Somerville and Sean Somerville,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2000
If the Friday after Thanksgiving has a flip side for retailers, it was yesterday. Unlike that late November day, known as the busiest shopping day of the year, yesterday's snow kept most -- if not all -- customers away. Early yesterday afternoon, downtown Baltimore streets were mostly empty except for an occasional snow plow or city bus. The quiet seemed broken only by the classical music blaring from speakers outside The Gallery at Harborplace. Storefront after storefront -- florists, restaurants, banks -- had their doors locked.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Raymond Ernest Callegary, an attorney who practiced in downtown Baltimore for nearly 60 years, died of a brain hemorrhage Saturday at Stella Maris Hospice. He was 88 and lived in Timonium. Born in Baltimore, he was the son of Ernest Callegary, a barber born in Italy, and the former Alice DeBussieres, a homemaker. The family lived on West Lafayette Avenue, and Mr. Callegary attended St. Martin's School. During the Depression, he delivered newspapers, including the old Baltimore News-Post and a German-language paper, the Deutsche Correspondent.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun Staff | September 21, 1996
Next week the slogans "Look Who's Moving Downtown" and "What's Up Downtown" will begin appearing on banners, signs and papers promoting Baltimore as a great place for business.The advertisements are part of an attempt by the Downtown Partnership of Baltimore to capitalize on a glimmer of progress made in the past several months to stem the loss of jobs in the city and attract new businesses.The Downtown Partnership, a quasi-public body which markets the central city as a good place to work, live and shop, says 60 HTC businesses have relocated or expanded their operations in the city this year.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.